Aeromarine 50

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Aeromarine 50
Aeromarine 50 B-2 250320 p339.png
Role Seaplane
National origin United States
Manufacturer Aeromarine
First flight 1919
Introduction Chicago Air Show

The Aeromarine 50, also called the Limousine Flying Boat, was a luxury seaplane.[1]

Design and development[edit]

After the First World War, Aeromarine had completed over 300 aircraft. Production was centered on seaplanes for sport and commercial use. President Inglis M. Uppercu, marketed the seaplane based in its luxury interior.[1]

The aircraft was a biplane seaplane with a two-pilot open cockpit and enclosed seating for three passengers. The engine was mounted in a pusher configuration.[2]

Operational history[edit]

One Aeromarine 50 was purchased by Aero Limited for New York-Atlantic City flights. Aeromarine Airways also operated Model 50 flying boats.[3]

Variants[edit]

Aeromarine 50B
Fully enclosed variant[4]
Aeromarine 50C
150 hp (112 kW) Hispano Suiza powered version[5]
Aeromarine 50 "S"
a commercial passenger variant.[6]

Specifications (Aeromarine 50)[edit]

Data from Mississippi Valley Magazine

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2
  • Capacity: 3
  • Upper wingspan: 48 ft 6 in (14.78 m)
  • Lower wingspan: 37 ft 8 in (11.48 m)
  • Height: 12 ft 7 in (3.84 m)
  • Empty weight: 2,280 lb (1,034 kg)
  • Gross weight: 3,000 lb (1,361 kg)
  • Fuel capacity: 40 U.S. gallons (150 L; 33 imp gal)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Aeromarine V-8 , 130 hp (97 kW)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 65 kn; 121 km/h (75 mph)
  • Stall speed: 38 kn; 71 km/h (44 mph)
  • Endurance: 3.5 hr
  • Rate of climb: 220 ft/min (1.1 m/s)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "none". Mississippi Valley Magazine: 26. March 1920. 
  2. ^ "The Aeromarine Website". Retrieved 13 January 2012. 
  3. ^ "none". Aviation: 485. 24 April 1922. 
  4. ^ E. R. Johnson. American Flying Boats and Amphibious Aircraft: An Illustrated History. p. 11. 
  5. ^ The Rotarian Mar 1920. p. 109. 
  6. ^ Manufacturers Aircraft Association. Aircraft year book By Aerospace Industries Association of America. p. 155.