Aerometer

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An aerometer is an instrument designed to measure the density (among other parameters) of the air and some gases.[1][2]

The word aerometer (or Ärometer, from Ancient Greek ἀήρ -aer "air" and μέτρον -métron "measure, scale") refers to various types of devices for measuring or handling of gases. The instruments designated with this name can be used to find: the density, the flow, the amount or some other parameter of the air or a determined gas.[1]

Another instrument called areometer (from Ancient Greek ἀραιός -araiós "lightness" and μέτρον -métron "measure, scale"), also known as hydrometer, used for measuring liquids density, is often confused with the term aerometer here defined.

Types of aerometers[edit]

  • Hall aerometer.[1]
  • Hutchinson aerometer.[3]
  • Struve aerometer.[4][5]
  • Scheurer aerometer.[6]
  • Smith aerometer.[7][8]
  • Frøkjær-Jensen aerometer.[9][10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Marshall Hall: Description of an Aerometer for making the necessary Corrections in Pneumatic Experiments, for reducing the Volumes of the Gases to a given Standard. The Journal of science and the arts, Band 5, J. Eastburn & Co., 1818, Seite 52 Online bei Google Books
  2. ^ «aerometer».
  3. ^ Mechanics' Magazine, No. 655, 27. February 1836. Online bei Google Books
  4. ^ Gresley, William Stukeley: A glossary of terms used in coal mining, E. & F.N. Spon London, New York 1883, Seite 273, Volltext auf archive.org
  5. ^ Thomas John Taylor, On the progressive application of machinery to mining purposes. In: Proceedings, Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Birmingham 1859, Seite 32 Online at Google Books and in The Civil engineer and architect's journal, Band 22, 1859, Seite 279 Google Books
  6. ^ A. Scheurer: Aerometer zur Bestimmung der in Dampfbottichen vorhandenen Luftmenge. Zeitschrift der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Mechanik und Optik, Deutsche Gesellschaft für Mechanik und Optik, J. Springer., 1900, Seite 86
  7. ^ Ronald J. Baken, Robert F. Orlikoff: Clinical measurement of speech and voice Speech Science. Cengage Learning, 2000, Seite 351. ISBN 1565938690 Online bei Google Books
  8. ^ S. Smith: The electro aerometer. In: Speech, Pathology and Therapy, 1960, Band 3, Seite 27–33. ISSN 0584-8687
  9. ^ Phonation types. In Phonetics, Working Papers. (1987). WPP, No. 67: Studies of Phonation Types. UC Los Angeles: Department of Linguistics, UCLA, Seite 31. Online
  10. ^ Børge Frøkjær-Jensen, Medizinunternehmen: Online