Affogato

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Affogato
Affogato.JPG
TypeBeverage
Main ingredientsGelato or ice cream (vanilla), espresso

An affogato /ˌɑːfəˈɡɑːtəʊ/, /ˌæfəˈɡɑːtəʊ/ or more traditionally known as "affogato al caffe"[1] (Italian for "drowned in coffee") is an Italian coffee-based dessert. It usually takes the form of a scoop of semisoft cheese-flavored (fior di latte) or vanilla gelato or ice cream topped or "drowned" with a shot of hot espresso. Some variations also include a shot of amaretto, Bicerin, Kahlua, or other liqueur.[2][3][4][5][6]

Variety of Affogato[edit]

Though restaurants and cafes in Italy categorize the affogato as a dessert, some restaurants and cafes outside of Italy categorize it as a beverage.[7] Whether a dessert or beverage, restaurants and cafes usually serve the affogato in a tall narrowing glass, allowing the fior di latte, vanilla gelato, or ice cream melt and combine with espresso into the hollowed space in the bottom of the glass.[6] Occasionally, coconut, berries, honeycomb and multiple flavors of ice cream are added.[8] A biscotto or cookie can also be served and enjoyed alongside this beverage.[9] Affogati are often enjoyed as a post-meal coffee dessert combo eaten and or drunk with a spoon or straw. [10][1]

While the recipe of the affogato is more or less standard in Italy, consisting of a scoop of vanilla gelato topped with a shot of espresso, variations exist in European and American restaurants.[11]

In Italy, it is known as "gelato al fior di latte" with the translation to English "flower of milk".[12] Typically the ingredients in the ice cream includes dairy, starch, and sugar. It is popular in countries where they dress it with chocolate syrup, cantuccini, or biscotti to provide extra flavors.[citation needed]

History[edit]

The origins of the affogato in Italian history are widely unknown.[12] However in America, the word affogato was added to the English Dictionary in 1992.[13]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Nolan, Greg (2018-04-26). "An Introduction to Affogato (Recipes and Tips)". I Need Coffee. Retrieved 2020-10-16.
  2. ^ Vettel, Phil (2002-07-07). "Unfussy Fortunato; Wicker Park eatery is simply impressive". Chicago Tribune. p. 25.
  3. ^ Gray, Joe (2008-07-03). "Gelato + espresso = affogato". Chicago Tribune. p. 7. Retrieved 2019-06-07.
  4. ^ Leech-Black, Sarah (2008-08-15). "An affogato to remember". Boston Globe.
  5. ^ Parks, Stella. "Fior di Latte Gelato Recipe". www.seriouseats.com. Retrieved 2020-09-08.
  6. ^ a b Powers, Deb. "Drink Guide: Affogato al Caffe". Blackout Coffee Co. Retrieved 2020-10-16.
  7. ^ "Recipe Of The Day: Affogato". The Huffington Post. 2013-05-17. Retrieved 2019-06-07.
  8. ^ "Expensive affogato and arrogant attitude". Tripadvisor. 2014-05-23. Retrieved 2019-06-07.
  9. ^ "Affogato Recipe". The Travel Bite. 2020-08-05. Retrieved 2020-10-15.
  10. ^ Schiessl, words: Courtney (2017-07-28). "What the Heck Is an Affogato". VinePair. Retrieved 2020-09-08.
  11. ^ Davies, Emiko (2013-08-26). "Italian Table Talk: Gelato, affogato & some history". Retrieved 2019-06-07.
  12. ^ a b Petrich, Ivan Laranjeira (2020-07-13). "What Is An Affogato?". Perfect Daily Grind. Retrieved 2020-10-19.
  13. ^ "Affogato". Merriam Webster Dictionary. Retrieved 2020-09-08.