Affogato

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Affogato
Affogato.JPG
Type Beverage
Main ingredients Gelato or ice cream (vanilla), espresso
Cookbook: Affogato  Media: Affogato

An affogato (Italian, "drowned") is a coffee-based dessert. It usually takes the form of a scoop of vanilla gelato or ice cream topped or "drowned" with a shot of hot espresso. Some variations also include a shot of amaretto, Bicerin or other liqueur. It is considered one drink, not a combination of coffee and ice cream.[1] [2]

Though restaurants and cafes in Italy categorize the affogato as a dessert, many western restaurants and cafes seem to struggle with deciding whether the affogato is a beverage or a dessert.[3] This has led some to add such extravagances as coconut, berries, honeycomb and multiple flavours of ice cream in order to justify a much higher price tag.[4]

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, "affogato" entered the English language in 1992.[5]

While the recipe of the affogato is more or less standard in Italy, consisting of a scoop of vanilla gelato topped with a shot of espresso, variations exist in European and American restaurants.[6] The chef Jamie Oliver suggests using scoops of vanilla ice cream sprinkled with roasted almonds, amaretti or biscotti biscuits, drenched in pecan and roast Arabica coffee.[7] He also suggests placing leftovers of Christmas desserts such as chocolate mousse, tart, pie or pudding below the scoop of ice cream.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gray, Joe (2008-07-03). "Gelato + espresso = affogato". Chicago Tribune. p. 7. Retrieved 2013-09-22. 
  2. ^ Leech-Black, Sarah (2007-08-15). "An affogato to remember". Boston Globe. Retrieved 2013-09-22. 
  3. ^ "Recipe of the day - Affogato". The Huffington Post. 17 May 2013. Retrieved 7 February 2017. 
  4. ^ Tripadvisor https://www.tripadvisor.com.au/ShowUserReviews-g2360181-d2491992-r206721355-Exeter_Studio_Restaurant-Exeter_Southern_Highlands_New_South_Wales.html.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  5. ^ "Does English still borrow words from other languages?". BBC News Online. 3 February 2014. Retrieved 2014-02-05. 
  6. ^ Davies, Emiko. "Italian Table Talk: Gelato, affogato & some history". http://www.emikodavies.com/. Emiko Davies. Retrieved 7 February 2017.  External link in |website= (help)
  7. ^ Quilter, John. "Recipe of Affogato". www.jamieoliver.com. Jamie Oliver. Retrieved 7 February 2017. 
  8. ^ Quilter, John. "Leftovers Affogato". www.jamieoliver.com. Jamie Oliver. Retrieved 7 February 2017.