Affogato

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Affogato
Affogato.JPG
TypeBeverage
Main ingredientsGelato or ice cream (vanilla), espresso

An affogato (Italian for "drowned") is an Italian coffee-based dessert. It usually takes the form of a scoop of fior di latte or vanilla gelato or ice cream topped or "drowned" with a shot of hot espresso. Some variations also include a shot of amaretto, Bicerin, or other liqueur.[1][2][3][4]

Though restaurants and cafes in Italy categorize the affogato as a dessert, some restaurants and cafes outside of Italy categorize it as a beverage.[5] Occasionally, coconut, berries, honeycomb and multiple flavors of ice cream are added.[6] Affogatos are often enjoyed as a post-meal coffee dessert combo. [7]

While the recipe of the affogato is more or less standard in Italy, consisting of a scoop of vanilla gelato topped with a shot of espresso, variations exist in European and American restaurants.[8]

History[edit]

The word affogato was added to the English Dictionary in 1992. [9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Vettel, Phil (2002-07-07). "Unfussy Fortunato; Wicker Park eatery is simply impressive". Chicago Tribune. p. 25.
  2. ^ Gray, Joe (2008-07-03). "Gelato + espresso = affogato". Chicago Tribune. p. 7. Retrieved 2019-06-07.
  3. ^ Leech-Black, Sarah (2008-08-15). "An affogato to remember". Boston Globe.
  4. ^ "Fior di Latte Gelato Recipe". www.seriouseats.com. Retrieved 2020-09-08.
  5. ^ "Recipe Of The Day: Affogato". The Huffington Post. 2013-05-17. Retrieved 2019-06-07.
  6. ^ "Expensive affogato and arrogant attitude". Tripadvisor. 2014-05-23. Retrieved 2019-06-07.
  7. ^ Schiessl, words: Courtney (2017-07-28). "What the Heck Is an Affogato". VinePair. Retrieved 2020-09-08.
  8. ^ Davies, Emiko (2013-08-26). "Italian Table Talk: Gelato, affogato & some history". Retrieved 2019-06-07.
  9. ^ "Definition of AFFOGATO". www.merriam-webster.com. Retrieved 2020-09-08.