African Democratic Congress

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The African Democratic Congress (ADC) is a political party in Nigeria.[1] The party was originally named "Alliance for Democratic Change" when it was formed in 2005, but changed to the African Democratic Congress by the time the party was registered with the Nigerian Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC).[2] The goal of this name change was for the party to be able "to effectively encompass and reflect the aspirations of our people."[3] The ADC headquarters is located in Abuja, Nigeria, but there are plans for the office to relocate in 2019.[1][4] The party constitution states that the goal of the party is to create a grass root organization, of and for Nigerians.[5] For the selection of their candidates for the 2019 Nigerian general election, the ADC used the method of party members directly electing candidates during the primaries.[6] On 24 September 2018, the African Democratic Congress selected senator Abdulaziz Nyako as the candidate for the 2019 Nigerian general elections.[7]

On 10 May 2018, the party was adopted by former Nigerian President, Olusegun Obasanjo's political movement called the "Coalition for Nigeria Movement" (CNM).[8] Obasanjo now serves as the chairman for the party. As per his speech titled "My Treatise For Future Of Democracy And Development In Nigeria", the goal of the CNM adopting the ADC party was "to work with others for bringing about desirable change in the Nigeria polity and governance". There are ADC representatives for every state in Nigeria.[9]

As of 2015, there are 5 ADC party members in the Nigerian National Assembly.[10] They are all members of the House of Representatives and represent constituencies in the Oyo State.[10] There are no ADC party members currently in the Nigerian Senate.[11]

ADC Constitution[edit]

The African Democratic Congress outlines the details of the party and its workings.[12] The constitution contains a preamble, 27 articles, and 3 schedules.[5] According to the constitution, the goal of the ADC is to be a "grass root" party, composed primarily of working-class and disadvantaged Nigerians.[5] The constitution also outlines that membership to the ADC party is open to "every citizen of Nigeria irrespective religion, ethnic group, place of birth, sex, social or economic status", once they are over 18 years old, not an active public officer, and do not belong to any other political party in Nigeria (membership is extended to those who renounce other party affiliations).[5] Monthly dues for membership in the ADC is 200.00 NGN.[13]

Elections[edit]

Presidential[edit]

In the 2007 Nigerian Presidential Election, the ADC put forth candidate Patrick Utomi.[14] He obtained 50,849 votes, and placed 4th in the election.[14]

In the 2011 Nigerian Presidential Election, the ADC put forth candidate Rev. Peter Uchenna Nwangwu.[15] He obtained 51,682 votes and placed 8th out of the 20 candidates in the election.[16]

In the 2015 Nigerian Presidential Election, the ADC put forth Dr. Mani Ibrahim Ahamad as their candidate. He obtained 29,665 votes which was 0.10% of the votes cast.[17] He placed 7th out of 14 candidates.[16]

Gubernatorial[edit]

Here are the results obtained by ADC candidates in general Gubernatorial Elections in Nigeria:

2011[16]
Candidate State Number of Votes Obtained Place Total Number of Candidates
Dr. Zainab Baba Mbila Kwonchi Adamawa 2,846 5th 5
Tare-Otu Actor Lugard Bayelsa 96 18th 35
Alhaji Abba Mohammed Borno 1,223 10th 12
Chief Frederick Uzodinma Enugu 42 16th 16
Osagide Lugard Lagos 8,365 4th 15
Mallam Shehu Abdullahi Sokoto 318 21st 30
2013[16]
Candidate State Number of Votes Obtained Place Total Number of Candidates
Chief Anayo A. Arinze Anambra 699 9th 23


2014[16]
Candidate State Number of Voted Obtained Place Total Number of Candidates
Oroko Bola Ekiti 542 10th 18
Comrde Gabriel G. Ojo Osun 1,783 9th 20

Senatorial[edit]

Here are the results obtained by ADC candidates in general Senatorial Elections in Nigeria:

2011[16]
Candidate State District Number of Votes Obtained Place Total Number of Candidates
Chief Kenneth C. Modekwe Anambra Anambra Central 1,870 5th 11
Chief O.C. Ebeze Anambra Anambra North 4,005 5th 12
Chukwunwike Nweke Anambra Anambra South 902 9th 12
Alh Abdulkadir Suleiman Borno Borno Central 1,256 7th 7
Barde Auwal Abba Gombe Gombe South 357 5th 5
Ibrahim Suleiman Kaduna Kaduna Central 1,366 7th 7
Ibrahim Suleiman Kaduna Kaduna North 564 6th 6
Abdullahi M. Bamalli Kaduna Kaduna South 827 7th 8
Isa Muhd Chiomawa Kano Kano Central 2,430 7th 12
Lawan Mai'unguwwa Kano Kano North 3,133 7th 8
Amini Shittu Kano Kano South 3,210 5th 8
Ibrahim Shehu Idris Katsina Katsina Central 770 9th 9
Abdullahi Shehu Katsina Katsina South 2,891 7th 7
Ibrahim Shehu Idris Kebbi Kebbi South 846 6th 6
Abdullahi Tank Kogi Kogi Central 148 9th 12
Uwani Ibrahim Kogi Kogi East 1,314 5th 8
Ameen O. Wahab Kwara Kwara Central 1 12th 12
Alh. Musa Hassan Niger Niger East 1,486 5th 5
Mohammed Abdullahi Niger Niger North 918 6th 6
Abdullahh Abubakar Niger Niger South 11,991 4th 7
Soba Moh'd Zakabiya Plateau Plateau North 2,423 7th 10

House of Representatives[edit]

As of 2015, there are 5 ADC party members in the House of Representatives and represent constituencies in the Oyo State.[10] Hon. Abiodun Olasupo represents the Iseyin/Itesiwaju/Kajola/Iwajowa constituency.[18] Hon. Adeyemi Sunday Adepoju represents the Ibarapa East/Ido constituency.[19] Hon. Olusunbo Samson represents the Oluyole Local Govt. constituency [20] Hon. Lam Adedapo represents the Ibadan North-East/ Ibadan South-East constituency.[21] Hon. Akintola Taiwo represents the Ona-Ara/Egbeda constituency.[22]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "List of all Registered Political Parties, their Headquarters addresses and Principal Officers". Vanguard News. 2018-01-20. Retrieved 2018-10-05.
  2. ^ "SELECTED SPEECHES COMMUNIQUE, AND PRESS RELEASE WHILE ON ZONALTOURAMO LAND MARK EVENTS" (PDF). INEC Nigeria. 30 March 2006. Archived from the original (PDF) on 31 October 2018. Retrieved 5 October 2018.
  3. ^ "ADC-Manifesto" (PDF). INEC Nigeria. Archived from the original (PDF) on 31 October 2018. Retrieved 5 October 2018.
  4. ^ "ANALYSIS: What we know about Obasanjo's new political party, ADC". Premium Times Nigeria. 2018-05-11. Retrieved 2018-12-10.
  5. ^ a b c d "ADC - Constitution" (PDF). INEC Nigeria. Archived from the original (PDF) on 26 October 2018. Retrieved 5 October 2018.
  6. ^ "ADC picks presidential candidate October 6". Premium Times Nigeria. 2018-09-13. Retrieved 2018-10-12.
  7. ^ "Adamawa 2019: ADC picks Nyako as gubernatorial candidate". Premium Times Nigeria. 2018-09-24. Retrieved 2018-10-05.
  8. ^ "Obasanjo's coalition adopts ADC as political party". Punch Newspapers. Retrieved 2018-11-28.
  9. ^ "Get Connected". African Democratic Congress (ADC). Retrieved 2018-11-28.
  10. ^ a b c "National Assembly | Federal Republic of Nigeria". nass.gov.ng. Retrieved 2018-12-10.
  11. ^ "National Assembly | Federal Republic of Nigeria". nass.gov.ng. Retrieved 2018-12-10.
  12. ^ "Constitutions & Manifestos « INEC Nigeria". www.inecnigeria.org. Archived from the original on 2018-10-18. Retrieved 2018-10-12.
  13. ^ "Subscribe to plan: ADC Monthly dues - Paystack". paystack.com. Retrieved 2018-11-28.
  14. ^ a b Tar, Usman A.; Zack-Williams, Alfred B. (2007). "Nigeria: Contested Elections & an Unstable Democracy". Review of African Political Economy. 34 (113): 540–548. JSTOR 20406428.
  15. ^ "2011: Nigeria needs fine statesman, not politician - Nwangwu". Vanguard News. Nigeria. 2011-03-11. Retrieved 2018-12-09.
  16. ^ a b c d e f "Elections Result « INEC Nigeria". www.inecnigeria.org. Archived from the original on 2016-02-01. Retrieved 2018-12-09.
  17. ^ Adeolu Durotoye (July 2015). "NIGERIA'S 2015 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION: BETWEEN DEMOCRATIC CONSOLIDATION AND CHANGE". European Scientific Journal. Retrieved 2018-12-09.
  18. ^ "National Assembly | Federal Republic of Nigeria". nass.gov.ng. Retrieved 2018-12-10.
  19. ^ "National Assembly | Federal Republic of Nigeria". nass.gov.ng. Retrieved 2018-12-10.
  20. ^ "National Assembly | Federal Republic of Nigeria". nass.gov.ng. Retrieved 2018-12-10.
  21. ^ "National Assembly | Federal Republic of Nigeria". nass.gov.ng. Retrieved 2018-12-10.
  22. ^ "National Assembly | Federal Republic of Nigeria". nass.gov.ng. Retrieved 2018-12-10.