After the War (Gary Moore album)

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After the War
AfterTheWar.jpg
Cover photo by John Claridge
Studio album by Gary Moore
Released 25 January 1989
Recorded 1988
Genre Hard rock, heavy metal
Length 53:01
Label Virgin
Producer Peter Collins
Gary Moore chronology
Wild Frontier
(1987)
After the War
(1989)
Still Got the Blues
(1990)
Singles from After the War
  1. "After the War"
    Released: December 1988
  2. "Ready for Love"
    Released: March 1989
  3. "Led Clones"
    Released: July 1989
  4. "Livin' on Dreams"
    Released: October 1989
Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic3/5 stars[1]
Collector's Guide to Heavy Metal6/10[2]
Kerrang!2/5 stars[3]
Rock Hard8.0/10[4]

After the War is the seventh solo studio album by Irish guitarist Gary Moore, released in 1989.

Like its predecessor Wild Frontier, After the War contains elements of Celtic music. The instrumental "Dunluce" is named after Dunluce Castle in Northern Ireland.

On "Led Clones", Ozzy Osbourne – with whom Moore had worked before the singer united with Randy Rhoads – shares lead vocals. The song pokes fun at bands such as Kingdom Come, who were popular at the time and based on a Led Zeppelin-type sound and image. "That song was great fun," Ozzy recalled, "and it was an honour to record with Gary."[5] The Sisters of Mercy frontman Andrew Eldritch provides backing vocals on the songs Backing vocals on "After the War", "Speak for Yourself" and "Blood of Emeralds". Moore again pays tribute to the memory of his long-time friend and colleague Phil Lynott with the song "Blood of Emeralds".

"After the War" would be Moore's last foray into conventional hard rock, and his last rock album of any kind until 1997's Dark Days in Paradise. Starting with his next album, Still Got the Blues, he would primarily switch to playing blues.

Although Cozy Powell played drums on the album, he was replaced by Chris Slade for the tour, as he was set to tour with Black Sabbath, in support of their album, Headless Cross, which he also played drums on the album.

Track listing[edit]

All tracks written by Gary Moore, except where indicated.

Side one
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
1."After the War" 4:17
2."Speak for Yourself"Moore, Neil Carter3:42
3."Livin' on Dreams" 4:14
4."Led Clones (feat. Ozzy Osbourne)"Moore, Carter6:07
Side two
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
1."Running from the Storm" 4:45
2."This Thing Called Love" 3:32
3."Ready for Love" 5:39
4."Blood of Emeralds"Moore, Carter8:19
CD release
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
1."Dunluce (Part 1)" (instrumental) 1:17
2."After the War" 4:17
3."Speak for Yourself"Moore, Carter3:42
4."Livin' on Dreams" 4:14
5."Led Clones (feat. Ozzy Osbourne)"Moore, Carter6:07
6."The Messiah Will Come Again" (instrumental)Roy Buchanan7:29
7."Running from the Storm" 4:45
8."This Thing Called Love" 3:22
9."Ready for Love" 5:39
10."Blood of Emeralds"Moore, Carter8:19
11."Dunluce (Part 2)" (instrumental) 3:50

Personnel[edit]

Musicians
Production
  • Peter Collins – producer
  • Ian Taylor – engineer, mixing
  • Duane Baron – mixing

Charts[edit]

Certifications[edit]

Country Organization Year Sales
Germany BVMI 1989 Gold (+ 250,000)[22]
UK BPI 1989 Silver (+ 60,000)[23]
Sweden IFPI Sweden 1989 Gold (+ 15,000)[24]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rivadavia, Eduardo. "Gary Moore - After the War review". AllMusic. Retrieved 22 May 2014. 
  2. ^ Popoff, Martin (1 November 2005). The Collector's Guide to Heavy Metal: Volume 2: The Eighties. Burlington, Ontario, Canada: Collector's Guide Publishing. pp. 230–231. ISBN 978-1-894959-31-5. 
  3. ^ Hotten, Jon (28 January 1989). "Don't Mention the War". Kerrang!. No. 223. p. 15. ISSN 0262-6624. 
  4. ^ Trojan, Frank (1989). "Review Album: Gary Moore - After the War". Rock Hard (in German). No. 32. Retrieved June 25, 2018. 
  5. ^ Wall, Mick (October 2014). "Jumping at shadows". Classic Rock. No. 202. p. 59. 
  6. ^ "Album – Gary Moore, After the War". Charts.de (in German). Media Control Charts. Retrieved 9 June 2018. 
  7. ^ a b c "Sisältää hitin: Levyt ja esittäjät Suomen musiikkilistoilla vuodesta 1961: MOK - MOY > Garu Moore". Sisältää hitin / Timo Pennanen. Retrieved 9 June 2018. 
  8. ^ "Gary Moore – After the War (Album)". Norwegiancharts.com. Media Control Charts. Retrieved 9 June 2018. 
  9. ^ "Gary Moore – After the War (Album)". Swedishcharts.com. Media Control Charts. Retrieved 9 June 2018. 
  10. ^ "Gary Moore – After the War". Hitparade.ch (in German). Media Control Charts. Retrieved 9 June 2018. 
  11. ^ "Gary Moore – After the War (Album)". Charts.org.nz. Media Control Charts. Retrieved 9 June 2018. 
  12. ^ AA.VV. (25 April 2006). Album Chart-Book Complete Edition 1970~2005. Tokyo, Japan: Oricon. ISBN 978-487-1-31077-2. 
  13. ^ "Gary Moore – After the War". Dutch Charts.nl (in Dutch). Media Control Charts. Retrieved 9 June 2018. 
  14. ^ a b c "Gary Moore Official Charts". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 9 June 2018. 
  15. ^ "Gary Moore Chart History – Billboard 200". Billboard.com. Billboard. Retrieved 9 June 2018. 
  16. ^ "Gary Moore – After the War (Song)". Norwegiancharts.com. Media Control Charts. Retrieved 9 June 2018. 
  17. ^ "Gary Moore – After the War (Song)". Swedishcharts.com. Media Control Charts. Retrieved 9 June 2018. 
  18. ^ "The Irish Cahrts: search for Gary Moore". Irish Recorded Music Association. Retrieved 9 June 2018. 
  19. ^ "Gary Moore – After the War". Hitparade.ch (in German). Media Control Charts. Retrieved 9 June 2018. 
  20. ^ "Gary Moore – After the War (Song)". Charts.org.nz. Media Control Charts. Retrieved 9 June 2018. 
  21. ^ "Gary Moore Chart History: Mainstream Rock". Billboard.com. Billboard. Retrieved 9 June 2018. 
  22. ^ "Gold-/Platin-Datenbank (Gary Moore)" (in German). Bundesverband Musikindustrie. Retrieved 9 June 2018. 
  23. ^ "BPI Awards Database: Search for Gary Moore". British Phonographic Industry. Retrieved 9 June 2018. 
  24. ^ IFPI Sweden – Gold & Platinum 1987–1998 (pdf) Archived 21 May 2012 at the Wayback Machine.