This is a good article. Click here for more information.

Agent Carter (TV series)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Agent Carter
Agent Carter TV series intertitle and logo.
Genre
Created by Christopher Markus
Stephen McFeely
Based on Peggy Carter
by Stan Lee
Jack Kirby
Starring
Composer(s) Christopher Lennertz
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 2
No. of episodes 18 (list of episodes)
Production
Executive producer(s)
Producer(s) Sara E. White
Location(s) Los Angeles, California
Cinematography
  • Gabriel Beristain (S1)
  • Edward J. Pei (S2)
Editor(s)
  • Mark Hartzell
  • Chris Peppe
  • Christopher Cooke
  • Troy Takaki
  • David Siegel
  • Andrew Doerfer
Running time 41–43 minutes
Production company(s)
Distributor Disney–ABC Domestic Television
Release
Original network ABC
Picture format 720p (HDTV)
Audio format 5.1 surround sound
Original release January 6, 2015 (2015-01-06) – March 1, 2016 (2016-03-01)
Chronology
Preceded by Marvel One-Shot: Agent Carter
Related shows
External links
Official website abc.go.com/shows/marvels-agent-carter

Marvel's Agent Carter, or simply Agent Carter, is an American television series created for ABC by Christopher Markus & Stephen McFeely, inspired by the 2011 film Captain America: The First Avenger, and the 2013 Marvel One-Shot short film of the same name.[1] It is set in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU), sharing continuity with the films and other television series of the franchise. The series was produced by ABC Studios, Marvel Television, and F&B Fazekas & Butters, with Tara Butters, Michele Fazekas, and Chris Dingess serving as showrunners.

The series features the Marvel Comics character Peggy Carter, with Hayley Atwell reprising her role from the film series and One-Shot, as she must balance life as a secret agent with that of a single woman in 1940s America. Development on a series inspired by the Agent Carter short film had begun by September 2013, with Atwell's involvement confirmed in January 2014. That May, ABC bypassed a pilot, ordering the show straight to series, with James D'Arcy, Chad Michael Murray, and Enver Gjokaj starring alongside Atwell; they are joined by Shea Whigham for the first season. The series introduces the origins of several characters and storylines from MCU films, while other characters from the films also appear.

The first season, consisting of eight episodes, originally aired from January 6 to February 24, 2015, while the second season, consisting of 10 episodes, originally aired from January 19 to March 1, 2016. Both seasons aired during mid-season breaks of Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. Despite a positive critical response, the series saw steadily decreasing-to-low viewership, and on May 12, 2016, ABC canceled Agent Carter.

Premise[edit]

The first season takes place in 1946, with Peggy Carter having to balance the routine office work she does for the Strategic Scientific Reserve (SSR) in New York City with secretly assisting Howard Stark, who finds himself framed for supplying deadly weapons to enemies of the United States. Carter is assisted by Stark's butler, Edwin Jarvis, to find those responsible and dispose of the weapons.[1][2] In the second season, Carter moves from New York City to Los Angeles to deal with the threats of the new Atomic Age by the Secret Empire in the aftermath of World War II, gaining new friends, a new home, and a potential new love interest.[3][4]

Cast and characters[edit]

  • Hayley Atwell as Peggy Carter:
    An SSR agent initially stuck doing administrative work.[1] Butters said Carter's "superpower is the fact that other people underestimate her. And she often uses that to her advantage".[5] On the influence that the apparent death of Steve Rogers has on Carter, Atwell explained that "he was the greatest person she ever knew—even before he took the serum and became Captain America. She knew his character and she saw a kindred spirit in him. So I think she's grieving the loss of him but she's also determined to make sure that his work wasn't in vain. That gives her a tremendous amount of determination to carry on despite the obstacles that she comes across."[6] Gabriella Graves portrays a young Carter.[7]
  • James D'Arcy as Edwin Jarvis:
    Howard Stark's butler and ally to Carter,[8] who will eventually be a tutor to Tony Stark and inspire his J.A.R.V.I.S. artificial intelligence.[9] Atwell referred to Carter's relationship with Jarvis as the series' "comic relief", and said "she needs someone who is in contact with Howard to help kind of run this mission[, and] they have this very witty banter back and forth".[6] Fazekas explained that Some of the character's persona "has come from the comics and some of it we've developed ourselves. Some of it is influenced by James D'Arcy himself and his strengths."[10] D'Arcy was initially nervous about portraying Jarvis's comedic side, given his history of "predominantly play[ing] psychopaths".[11] He did not study Paul Bettany's performance as J.A.R.V.I.S. when approaching the character.[12]
  • Chad Michael Murray as Jack Thompson:
    A war veteran and agent with the SSR,[13] described as chauvinistic and "chest-puffing".[5][14] Murray compared the character to Indiana Jones, and stated that "he's working his way up to become the head of the SSR. His goal in life is to just be great at his job. So he has a large chip on his shoulder, which gives him an attitude."[13] Murray also noted that, unlike his character on One Tree Hill, Thompson does not serve as the "moral compass", which meant that he would not be "confined to a box" and would instead be allowed to "really play things up and do what's unexpected".[15] For the second season, Thompson is made chief of the East Coast SSR office.[4]
  • Enver Gjokaj as Daniel Sousa:
    A war veteran who is an agent with the SSR and experiences prejudice due to his crippled leg.[14][16] "He accepts his injury, he accepts his compromised status in society ... Peggy says, 'Forget this. I'm Peggy Carter. I'm going to do something else.' I think that's the difference between the two of them."[17] Considering a potentially romantic relationship between Sousa and Carter, Gjokaj said, "I think there's definitely a situation where...if she hadn't dated Captain America, he might ask her out for a drink. It's like if your new girlfriend dated Ryan Gosling. It's going to make you sweat a bit."[18] For the second season, Sousa is made chief of the West Coast SSR office.[4]
  • Shea Whigham as Roger Dooley:
    The SSR chief who oversees agents Carter, Thompson, and Sousa,[19] until he dies to save his fellow SSR agents at the end of season one.[20] Unlike many of the other agents, Whigham believes that Dooley does respect Carter, saying "I think he likes her. I think he cares deeply. I'm not sure that he can always show that, but I think you'll see that he cares deeply about Carter. And these are things that keep him up at night, as well as the other boys, when I send them out on missions."[21] The character was always intended to die during the first season's penultimate episode, to help build stakes for the series given that "everyone knows Peggy lives", so from the beginning Whigham was only hired for the seven required episodes.[22]

Episodes[edit]

Season 1 (2015)[edit]

No.
overall
No. in
season
Title Directed by Written by Original air date U.S. viewers
(millions)
1 1 "Now is Not the End" Louis D'Esposito Christopher Markus & Stephen McFeely January 6, 2015 (2015-01-06) 6.91[23]
2 2 "Bridge and Tunnel" Joseph V. Russo Eric Pearson January 6, 2015 (2015-01-06) 6.91[23]
3 3 "Time and Tide" Scott Winant Andi Bushell January 13, 2015 (2015-01-13) 5.10[24]
4 4 "The Blitzkrieg Button" Stephen Cragg Brant Englestein January 27, 2015 (2015-01-27) 4.63[25]
5 5 "The Iron Ceiling" Peter Leto Jose Molina February 3, 2015 (2015-02-03) 4.20[26]
6 6 "A Sin to Err" Stephen Williams Lindsey Allen February 10, 2015 (2015-02-10) 4.25[27]
7 7 "Snafu" Vincent Misiano Chris Dingess February 17, 2015 (2015-02-17) 4.15[28]
8 8 "Valediction" Christopher Misiano Michele Fazekas & Tara Butters February 24, 2015 (2015-02-24) 4.02[29]

Season 2 (2016)[edit]

No.
overall
No. in
season
Title Directed by Written by Original air date U.S. viewers
(millions)
9 1 "The Lady in the Lake" Lawrence Trilling Brant Englestein January 19, 2016 (2016-01-19) 3.18[30]
10 2 "A View in the Dark" Lawrence Trilling Eric Pearson & Lindsey Allen January 19, 2016 (2016-01-19) 3.18[30]
11 3 "Better Angels" David Platt Jose Molina January 26, 2016 (2016-01-26) 2.90[31]
12 4 "Smoke & Mirrors" David Platt Sue Chung February 2, 2016 (2016-02-02) 2.77[32]
13 5 "The Atomic Job" Craig Zisk Lindsey Allen February 9, 2016 (2016-02-09) 2.66[33]
14 6 "Life of the Party" Craig Zisk Eric Pearson February 16, 2016 (2016-02-16) 2.39[34]
15 7 "Monsters" Metin Hüseyin Brandon Easton February 16, 2016 (2016-02-16) 2.39[34]
16 8 "The Edge of Mystery" Metin Hüseyin Brant Englestein February 23, 2016 (2016-02-23) 2.50[35]
17 9 "A Little Song and Dance" Jennifer Getzinger Story by : Michele Fazekas & Tara Butters
Teleplay by : Chris Dingess
February 23, 2016 (2016-02-23) 2.50[35]
18 10 "Hollywood Ending" Jennifer Getzinger Story by : Chris Dingess
Teleplay by : Michele Fazekas & Tara Butters
March 1, 2016 (2016-03-01) 2.35[36]

Production[edit]

Development[edit]

A potential Agent Carter series was initially brought up in July 2013 by Louis D'Esposito, after a screening of his Agent Carter One-Shot at San Diego Comic-Con.[5] By September, Marvel Television was developing a series inspired by the short film, featuring Peggy Carter, and was in search of a writer for the series.[37] In January 2014, ABC Entertainment Group president Paul Lee confirmed that the show was in development, and revealed that Tara Butters and Michele Fazekas would act as the series' showrunners.[38] Chris Dingess also serves as a showrunner.[18] In March 2014, Christopher Markus & Stephen McFeely, writers of the Captain America films, stated that they envisioned the series, which had not yet been greenlit, as a limited series of approximately 13 episodes.[39] By April 2014, there were indications that the series would be ordered straight to series, bypassing a pilot order, and would air between the late 2014 and early 2015 portions of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., if that series got a second season renewal.[40]

On May 8, 2014, ABC officially ordered the series for eight episodes,[41][42] with executive producers Butters, Fazekas, Markus, McFeely, Dingess, Kevin Feige, Louis D'Esposito, Alan Fine, Joe Quesada, Stan Lee, and Jeph Loeb.[2] The series was renewed for a second season on May 7, 2015, of 10 episodes.[43][44] In March 2016, Fazekas noted that the producers felt "bad" about the chances for a third season due to the series' low viewership, adding she "would love to see it live on, even if it's in some other form, digital or whatever. I doubt that there's a Netflix play for it." She also added that ABC wanted some sort of conclusion to the series, and so the writers and producers would find a way to conclude the lingering plot threads in some form if the series was not renewed.[45] On May 12, 2016, ABC canceled the series.[46] Loeb said he did not understand the decision, as "there were no conversations" regarding the series, with Marvel only receiving a call from ABC saying Agent Carter was canceled.[47] He added that since the networks decide what content they would like from Marvel Television, "if someone wants to call and say, 'We want a two-hour Agent Carter [film special] for May 2017,' boom. We'll put together the greatest Agent Carter movie we can.”[48] After speculation regarding a revival for the series by Netflix, chief content officer Ted Sarandos stated the streaming service passed on reviving Agent Carter because it is "looking for truly original brands to own and in that Marvel space we already have" original Marvel series. He also added that due to existing international broadcasting "deal complexities" for the series, Netflix would not have been able to air Agent Carter globally, as "Some of those output partners still had it on the air, so they would argue its covered by their output [deals]. Unfortunately, it was a business decision more than a creative one."[49]

Atwell had stated on potential further seasons, "We think that there could be more to come....the [second season] finale doesn't suggest that that's it and they live happily ever after; that's the end. We know that's not the case. They've done it in a very clever way which wraps up and that gives the audience a very satisfying conclusion but they're not quite finishing it and leaving it there."[50] On the location for a third season, Fazekas stated that moving the series to London had been a possibility, an idea that creators Markus and McFeely had early on. Fazekas added, "you can put the show anywhere, because it's spies. [The location is] all going to be determined by what story we want to tell. I loved [Los Angeles]. I loved how it looked, I loved how it looked on Peggy. We would be very happy to do another L.A. season, but we're not married to it."[45] Fazekas also said that seeds for a third season had been planted all throughout the second, and that the end of the second season, with someone shooting Thompson and taking the M. Carter file, was "very much tied to a third season arc", with the shooter and their reason for taking the file already determined.[51] Atwell added that the third season would have gone "further back into [Carter's] past” while having "a possible kind of twist... into something to do with [her] family." She also added that more insight would have been provided on Carter's brother, Michael.[52]

Writing[edit]

It's a really rich period in history, where this giant opposition we had going for 10 years with the Nazis is gone, and we're not completely positive what the rules are anymore. Who gets the scientists? Who gets the secrets? It's all on the table. Everyone developed these skills in World War II. People became spies, people became murderers. And suddenly the war was over, and they came back, and it's like, 'Wow, I know how to do some shit. Now, what do I do with this?' It's nice to play with that assortment of characters. An office, basically full of people who just came back from the war. There's no telling what any of them experienced last year.

—Co-creator Christopher Markus on exploring the dynamic of 1940s characters.[53]

Markus and McFeely stated in March 2014 that the series would be set in 1946 initially, occurring in the middle of the timeline established in the One-Shot, and would focus on one case for Carter. Additional seasons would then advance a year and examine a new case.[39] Despite working on Captain America: Civil War at the same time, Markus and McFeely remained involved with the series after writing the first script.[54] When the showrunners joined the series, they went on a "mini-camp" with Markus and McFeely to develop the series from a pilot script written by the pair.[55] They looked to several different influences outside of Marvel in developing the series, including Raiders of the Lost Ark, L.A. Confidential, and the works of author James Ellroy.[18] Elaborating on deviating from the comics, Fazekas said, for example, "if we're using a minor character or a bad guy from an old comic book, we don't have to adhere to what that character was in that comic book from 1945. Because there are so many different iterations of a specific character, you can't be true to every single one."[56] ABC asked the producers to not have the series follow a "Gadget of the Week or Bad Guy of the Week" model, and instead focus on telling the story of Carter balancing her personal and professional lives. Fazekas called this "such a nice change" from previous television experience, with the group feeling free to drop whole story ideas in favor of focusing on the series' central storyline.[55]

On the time periods the series could potentially explore following the first season given Carter's role in Captain America: The Winter Soldier, Atwell said, "I think the great thing about the fact that I've already played her at the end of her life means that we know ... [Now] we have an opportunity, if the show does go into second and third and fourth and fifth [seasons], we know that we can explore all of these aspects of her character because we know she lives such a long life and she's had a fulfilled life. I think what's going to start happening in Season 1 is seeds are going to be planted as to what happens in her personal life—and yet it's still open to the possibility of new men coming into her life, deepening relationships with the men that we discover in Season 1. Obviously, the era is 1946 but in the second, third, fourth, fifth season—if it goes onto that—we can explore different time periods. We can explore the late forties, the early fifties, the sixties, the seventies, the eighties, up until present day, so it's very exciting because of that."[6] However, Butters clarified that future seasons would likely stay in the same time period, possibly changing location to a place like Hollywood or Europe, to remain in a pre-S.H.I.E.L.D. setting and avoid competing with Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.[57] This was the case with the second season, which moved the series to 1947 Los Angeles.[58]

Casting[edit]

Atwell, who portrayed Carter in Captain America: The First Avenger, Captain America: The Winter Soldier, and the Agent Carter short film, expressed interest in returning as the character in October 2013,[59] before Lee confirmed her involvement in January 2014.[38] That August, Chad Michael Murray and Enver Gjokaj were cast as SSR agents Jack Thompson and Daniel Sousa, respectively,[16] while James D'Arcy was cast the next month as Edwin Jarvis,[8] the character who would eventually inspire the artificial intelligence J.A.R.V.I.S. from the MCU films.[9] Shea Whigham was also cast, as SSR chief Roger Dooley.[19] Atwell, D'Arcy, Gjokaj, and Murray returned for the second season.[4]

Design[edit]

Costumes[edit]

The costume designer for the series is Giovanna Ottobre-Melton, who felt comfortable with the series' period setting after spending months researching American styles in the 1940s for the 2013 television series Mob City.[60] She noted that "many comic books were all blended by the color, style, and fabrics" from 1940s New York.[61] Due to the large amount of action in the series, fabrics "with the feel and texture of the 1940s" had to be sourced in large quantities, to allow for the creation of four, five, or more of each costume.[60] Ottobre-Melton's process "for each episode, [is to] read the script first, and then search for historic photos that relate to what the episode is about. Afterwards I chose the fabrics, and then begin to design the outfits."[61]

Props[edit]

When creating the gadgets for the series, the writers noted the need to combine the period setting with the influence of Howard Stark, who opens the door to "things that are fantastic for the time period". They worked closely with the props department to develop technology that appears "both retro and futuristic at the same time", with Fazekas explaining that the goal was to avoid a science fiction look, so the fantastical aspects were reserved solely for function while the aesthetic was kept within the realms of that time period.[62]

Filming[edit]

Filming for the series took place in Los Angeles, with the story's location shifting from New York City to Los Angeles with the second season to capitalize on this.[63][64] Gabriel Beristain, cinematographer for the One-Shot and the first season of the series, used a combination of modern digital technology and traditional analog techniques to replicate the feel of classic films that are set in the 1940s, but to also have the convenience and consistency of modern technology, such as using the Arri Alexa digital camera, along with Leica Lenses and silk-stocking diffusion nets.[65][66] Edward J. Pei took over as cinematographer for the second season.[67] Stunt coordinator Casey O'Neill, who also worked on the One-Shot and Captain America: The Winter Soldier, incorporated the specific fighting styles of the characters, such as the more "CIA-trained" fighting of Carter or the more acrobatic, "Black Widow"-inspired style of antagonist Dottie Underwood.[68][69]

Visual effects[edit]

Sheena Duggal serves as visual effect supervisor, returning in the same capacity from the Agent Carter One-Shot,[70] with the visual effects for the series created by Industrial Light & Magic (ILM), Base FX,[71] and later DNeg TV.[72][73] Duggal worked closest with ILM, who coordinated with Base and DNeg to ensure a "seamless workflow". The majority of the series' visual effects work focuses on set extensions to depict the period setting, as well as the more fantastical aspects such as Howard Stark's inventions,[72] or Zero Matter and Jason Wilkes' intangibility in the second season.[73]

Music[edit]

In June 2014, Christopher Lennertz, who composed the music for the Agent Carter One-Shot, talked about potentially working on the series, saying, D'Esposito "told me last summer at Comic-Con that there was a possibility this was going to become a series. And he said that if he was going to be involved, he wanted me to be involved, too."[74] In September 2014, Lennertz officially signed on to compose for the series.[75] Lennertz combined all the different style elements of the show in the music, such as mixing jazz and period elements, with orchestra and electronic elements. Lennertz said, the music is "always done from a sense of being sort of in control and savvy and clever, rather than just being strong or just having a superpower or sort of being so much further along than anybody else physically. Part of it was just trying to make it that she's just smarter than everybody else. She's got such command over so many of these situations, and that was the most important thing was to give her that personality."[76] A soundtrack album for the first season was released on iTunes on December 11, 2015,[77] and the single "Whatcha Gonna Do (It's Up to You)" from the second season was released on March 18, 2016.[78]

Marvel Cinematic Universe tie-ins[edit]

We work really closely with Eric Carroll in Marvel Studios. He's sort of the guy who tells us, "Well, you can't really do this to that thing, because that's going to step on this project. But what if you do this?" They're really generous with that world.

—Fazekas on working in with Marvel Cinematic Universe canon.[79]

Because Carter originates from the films, Marvel Studios co-presidents Feige and D'Esposito "are very invested in this and they've been really collaborative and very generous with their world".[56] Markus, talking about the series' place in the greater architecture of the MCU, later said "you really only need to drop the tiniest bit of hint and its connected. You don't have to go, "Howard Stark's wearing the same pants that Tony wears!"...Everything is enhanced just by the knowledge that its all connected."[54] Butters said, "We always want to feel like you see us as a piece of [the MCU]. But because of our time period, we kind of are on our own a little bit."[80]

In July 2014, Fazekas talked about how the series would relate to the One-Shot, saying, "The short really is the basis for the series. [Carter]'s working at SSR, post-war...If you think of the short as sort of the end of the series, the series would be leading up to that moment where she gets assigned to S.H.I.E.L.D."[81] Markus reiterated this in January 2015, but added that "we all agree and understand that [keeping continuity with the short is] going to get tougher if we continue" making the series.[54] The first season introduces the origins of the Black Widow and Winter Soldier programs, which both appear in several MCU films,[82][83][84] while the second season shows the discovery of the Darkforce (known as Zero Matter in the series), which previously appeared in Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. and has ties to Doctor Strange.[85]

Release[edit]

Season Episodes Originally aired DVD and Blu-ray release dates
First aired Last aired Region 1 Region 2 Region 4
1 8 January 6, 2015 February 24, 2015 September 18, 2015[86] November 30, 2015[87] December 7, 2016[88]
2 10 January 19, 2016 March 1, 2016 TBA December 5, 2016[89] TBA

Broadcast[edit]

Agent Carter aired on ABC in the United States,[90] in 720p high definition and 5.1 surround sound.[91] It also aired on CTV in Canada, and TV2 in New Zealand.[92][93] In October 2014, Channel 4, the channel that airs Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. in the United Kingdom, stated that they did not "have any current plans [to air] Agent Carter".[94] In June 2015, FOX UK purchased the broadcast rights for the United Kingdom,[95] with the series premiering on July 12, 2015.[96] In February 2016, the series was announced to air on 7flix in Australia.[97]

Home media[edit]

The complete first season became available on Blu-ray and DVD on September 18, 2015, as an Amazon.com exclusive.[86]

Reception[edit]

Season Nielsen ratings Critical response
Premiere total viewers
(in millions)
Finale total viewers
(in millions)
Season average total viewers,
inc. DVR (in millions)
Rank 18–49 rating (rank) Rotten Tomatoes Metacritic
1 6.91[23] 4.02[29] 7.61 29 2.4 (29)[98] 95% (42 reviews)[99] 73 (26 reviews)[100]
2 3.18[30] 2.35[36] 4.37 109 1.4 (88)[101] 81% (16 reviews)[102] N/A

Ratings[edit]

Maureen Ryan of Variety blamed both seasons' low viewership on "the questionable scheduling decisions" made by then ABC president Paul Lee, saying that the series "has received lackluster promotion, especially [for its second season]. The botched rollout of season two included a changed premiere date and episodes that were difficult to access in advance on Marvel's dreadful media site. Capping the mishandling is the fact that the full first season was only made available on ABC.com days before season two began, which frustrated viewers who might have wanted to jump on board in advance."[103]

Critical response[edit]

The review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes reported a 95% approval rating with an average rating of 7.9/10 based on 34 reviews for the first season. The website's consensus reads, "Focusing on Peggy Carter as a person first and an action hero second makes Marvel's Agent Carter a winning, stylish drama with bursts of excitement and an undercurrent of cheeky fun".[99] Metacritic, which uses a weighted average, assigned a score of 73 out of 100 based on 27 reviews, indicating "generally favorable reviews".[100] The second season scored an 81% approval rating with an average score of 7.9/10 based on 16 reviews. The website's consensus reads, "A move from New York to Hollywood gives Agent Carter new territory to explore, as the series continues to search for a storyline as dynamic as its heroine".[102]

Analysis[edit]

Arguing for the renewal of the series for a third season following its low viewership, Ryan said that "letting the show die would be a serious mistake, for the network and for the bigger Disney-ABC conglomerate...These days, entertainment properties have to be viewed not just through the lens of their ratings (admittedly weak for Agent Carter). They have to be evaluated within the context of the overall value they bring to any entertainment colossus, and what Agent Carter adds to Disney-ABC is simply too valuable to give up...[bringing] something different to the company's superhero portfolio." She suggested if ABC did not renew the series for broadcast, that it should explore other opportunities, such as debuting on its online Watch ABC app, or being sold to Netflix, where "fans of super-heroic storytelling already flock to" and Agent Carter's "status as a period piece—which may have harmed it on broadcast—could be a real draw for Netflix viewers". Ryan also felt Marvel "could copy what CBS is doing with Star Trek" by creating a subscription service for a monthly fee, where consumers could access Marvel's films and televisions shows "as well as premium exclusives like a third season of Agent Carter". Ryan concluded, "A third Agent Carter season could help solidify Marvel's standing not just with female fans, but with everyone who appreciates excellent and adventurous storytelling."[103]

When the series was canceled shortly after the release of Captain America: Civil War, in which Carter dies, Meagan Damore of Comic Book Resources felt that "for all intents and purposes" Carter had "effectively been phased out of the Marvel Cinematic Universe", and the universe had subsequently lost "a wonderful role model and...inspiration" to fans of the character and series. Damore lamented the fact that the second season's cliffhanger ending had been left unresolved, and that viewers would never get the chance to see Carter's "happy ending", despite knowing she gets one, leaving the character's "fate unfulfilled, languishing in the obscurity of 'what could have beens'". She also noted that Marvel had now lost "the opportunity to show several prominent MCU events, not the least of which is the founding of S.H.I.E.L.D.", and added that despite making "leaps and bounds for women in the MCU, the same [could not] be said for people of color," wishing the series had addressed Asian American women like Hazel Ying Lee, one of 38 Women Airforce Service Pilots who died in the line of duty, or Black women like Harriet Ida Pikens and Frances Wills, the first two Black members of the United States Naval Reserve.[104]

Accolades[edit]

Year Award Category Recipient Result Ref.
2015 Saturn Awards Best Superhero Adaptation Television Series Agent Carter Nominated [105]
Best Actress in a Television Series Hayley Atwell Nominated
Best Guest Performance in a Television Series Dominic Cooper Nominated
Online Film & Television Association Awards Best Guest Actor in a Drama Series Dominic Cooper Nominated [106]
Best Production Design in a Series Agent Carter Nominated
Best Costume Design in a Series Agent Carter Nominated
2016 Visual Effects Society Awards Outstanding Supporting Visual Effects in a Photoreal Episode "Now is Not the End" Nominated [107]
Make-Up Artists and Hair Stylists Guild Awards Television and New Media Series – Best Period and/or Character Hair Styling Agent Carter Nominated [108]
Saturn Awards Best Superhero Adaptation Series Agent Carter Nominated [109]

Potential spin-off podcast[edit]

In March 2015, Butters stated that there had been discussions about creating a podcast with Thrilling Adventure Hour co-creator and writer Ben Blacker, centered around the fictional Captain America Adventure Program radio show that is depicted during the series' first season. Butters said that well-received segments had not been part of the original pitch to Marvel, and noted that a second season renewal for the series would help the real world podcast's chances. She stated that the potential episodes would be "little fifteen-minute storylines".[57]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Strom, Marc (May 10, 2014). "First Details on Marvel's Agent Carter". Marvel.com. Archived from the original on May 10, 2014. Retrieved May 10, 2014. 
  2. ^ a b Cavanaugh, Patrick (October 27, 2014). "See What's in Store for Marvel's Agent Carter in the Official Series Synopsis". Marvel.com. Archived from the original on October 28, 2014. Retrieved October 27, 2014. 
  3. ^ Abrams, Natalie; Hibberd, James (May 12, 2015). "Agent Carter moving to a new city in season 2". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved May 12, 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c d Hamilton, Jason (December 31, 2015). "Agent Carter Season 2 Full Synopsis Offers New Story Details". Screen Rant. Archived from the original on January 1, 2016. Retrieved January 5, 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c Abrams, Natalie (January 2, 2015). "Agent Carter crashes the boys' club". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on January 3, 2015. Retrieved January 3, 2015. 
  6. ^ a b c Goldman, Eric (January 2, 2015). "Hayley Atwell Talks Marvel's Agent Carter And Peggy Carrying On Captain America's Work". IGN. Archived from the original on January 3, 2015. Retrieved January 3, 2015. 
  7. ^ "Scoop: MARVEL'S AGENT CARTER on ABC – Tuesday, February 2, 2016". BroadwayWorld. January 19, 2016. Archived from the original on January 20, 2016. Retrieved January 20, 2016. 
  8. ^ a b Kroll, Justin (September 16, 2014). "James D'Arcy to Co-Star With Hayley Atwell in Marvel's 'Agent Carter' (EXCLUSIVE)". Variety. Archived from the original on September 16, 2014. Retrieved September 16, 2014. 
  9. ^ a b Trumbore, Dave (July 25, 2014). "Agent Carter to Feature Edwin Jarvis, aka Howard Stark's Butler and Inspiration for Tony Stark's AI". Collider. Archived from the original on July 26, 2014. Retrieved July 25, 2014. 
  10. ^ Couch, Aaron (January 27, 2015). "'Agent Carter' Bosses on 'Captain America' Bombshell, Howling Commandos Plot". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on January 31, 2015. Retrieved January 31, 2015. 
  11. ^ "AGENT CARTER TCA Panel Recap: Cast and Producers Talk How Jarvis Became a Part of the Story, the Show's Feminism, Easter Eggs, and More". Collider. January 16, 2015. Archived from the original on January 17, 2015. Retrieved January 17, 2015. 
  12. ^ Huver, Scott (January 26, 2015). ""Agent Carter's" James D'Arcy Talks the Many Facets of Edwin Jarvis". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on February 5, 2015. Retrieved February 6, 2015. 
  13. ^ a b Cavanaugh, Patrick (January 6, 2015). "Chad Michael Murray Drops Some Intel on Marvel's Agent Carter". Marvel.com. Archived from the original on January 9, 2015. Retrieved January 9, 2015. 
  14. ^ a b Mitovich, Matt Webb (January 2, 2015). "Hayley Atwell Teases Agent Carter's Surprising Dark Direction, Details Peggy's Grieving of Captain America". TVLine. Archived from the original on January 3, 2015. Retrieved January 3, 2015. 
  15. ^ Schwartz, Terri (January 20, 2015). "Chad Michael Murray is happy he's not 'Agent Carter's' moral compass". Zap2it. Archived from the original on February 5, 2015. Retrieved February 5, 2015. 
  16. ^ a b Andreeva, Nellie (August 29, 2014). "Enver Gjokaj Cast In ABC Series 'Marvel's Agent Carter'". Deadline.com. Archived from the original on August 29, 2014. Retrieved August 29, 2014. 
  17. ^ Cavanaugh, Patrick (January 13, 2015). "Enver Gjokaj Reports For Duty on Marvel's Agent Carter". Marvel.com. Archived from the original on January 17, 2015. Retrieved January 17, 2015. 
  18. ^ a b c McIntrye, Gina (January 2, 2015). "'Agent Carter': Hayley Atwell reprises capable 1940s spy for Marvel TV show". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on January 3, 2015. Retrieved January 3, 2015. 
  19. ^ a b Andreeva, Nellie (September 22, 2014). "Shea Whigham To Co-Star On 'Marvel's Agent Carter'". Deadline.com. Archived from the original on September 23, 2014. Retrieved September 22, 2014. 
  20. ^ Schwartz, Terri (February 17, 2015). "'Agent Carter' kills its first main character in a spectacular way". Zap2it. Archived from the original on May 2, 2016. Retrieved May 3, 2016. 
  21. ^ Cavanaugh, Patrick (January 9, 2015). "Shea Whigham Divulges Details on Marvel's Agent Carter". Marvel.com. Archived from the original on January 14, 2015. Retrieved January 14, 2015. 
  22. ^ Goldman, Eric (February 23, 2015). "Agent Carter Showrunners Discuss That Big Death and Preview the Finale". IGN. Archived from the original on February 24, 2015. Retrieved May 3, 2016. 
  23. ^ a b c Bibel, Sara (January 8, 2015). "Tuesday Final Ratings: No Adjustments to 'Agent Carter', 'Person of Interest' or 'Forever'". TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on July 18, 2015. Retrieved January 8, 2015. 
  24. ^ Kondolojy, Amanda (January 15, 2015). "Tuesday Final Ratings: 'Person of Interest' & 'NCIS: New Orleans' Adjusted Up". TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on July 18, 2015. Retrieved January 15, 2015. 
  25. ^ Kondolojy, Amanda (January 28, 2015). "Tuesday Final Ratings: 'MasterChef Jr.' & 'Marry Me' Adjusted Up; 'Supernatural' Adjusted Down". TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on July 18, 2015. Retrieved January 28, 2015. 
  26. ^ Bibel, Sara (February 4, 2015). "Tuesday Final Ratings: 'Supernatural', 'Marry Me', 'The Mindy Project' & 'About A Boy' Adjusted Down". TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on July 18, 2015. Retrieved February 4, 2015. 
  27. ^ Kondolojy, Amanda (February 11, 2015). "Tuesday Final Ratings: 'NCIS', 'The Flash', 'Parks and Recreation', 'NCIS: New Orleans', 'Person of Interest' & 'About a Boy' Adjusted Up". TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on July 18, 2015. Retrieved February 11, 2015. 
  28. ^ Bibel, Sara (February 19, 2015). "Tuesday Final Ratings: 'The Flash' & 'NCIS' Adjusted Up; 'Supernatural' Adjusted Down". TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on July 18, 2015. Retrieved February 19, 2015. 
  29. ^ a b Kondolojy, Amanda (February 25, 2015). "Tuesday Final Ratings: 'The Voice' Adjusted Up; 'NCIS', 'NCIS: New Orleans', 'Fresh Off the Boat', 'New Girl' & 'TV's Hottest Commercials' Adjusted Down". TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on July 18, 2015. Retrieved February 26, 2015. 
  30. ^ a b c Porter, Rick (January 21, 2016). "Tuesday final ratings: 'Chicago Fire' and 'Hollywood Game Night' adjust up". TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on January 21, 2016. Retrieved January 21, 2016. 
  31. ^ Porter, Rick (January 27, 2016). "Tuesday final ratings: 'Chicago Med' adjusts up". TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on January 28, 2016. Retrieved January 27, 2016. 
  32. ^ Porter, Rick (February 3, 2016). "Tuesday final ratings: 'The Muppets' adjusts up, 'iZombie' adjusts down". TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on February 4, 2016. Retrieved February 3, 2016. 
  33. ^ Porter, Rick (February 10, 2016). "Tuesday final ratings: 'Muppets', 'iZombie', 'NCIS: New Orleans' and 'Grinder' all adjust down". TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on February 10, 2016. Retrieved February 11, 2016. 
  34. ^ a b Porter, Rick (February 18, 2016). "Tuesday final ratings: 'Hollywood Game Night' and 'iZombie' adjust down". TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on February 19, 2016. Retrieved February 18, 2016. 
  35. ^ a b Porter, Rick (February 24, 2016). "Tuesday final ratings: 'Agent Carter' adjusts up". TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on February 25, 2016. Retrieved February 24, 2016. 
  36. ^ a b Porter, Rick (March 2, 2016). "Tuesday Final Ratings: 'New Girl' adjusts up". TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on March 2, 2016. Retrieved March 2, 2016. 
  37. ^ Andreeva, Nellie (September 18, 2013). "Marvel Developing 'Agent Carter' TV Series". Deadline.com. Archived from the original on September 19, 2013. Retrieved September 19, 2013. 
  38. ^ a b Goldberg, Lesley (January 17, 2014). "Marvel's 'Agent Carter': Hayley Atwell, Writers, Showrunners Confirmed for ABC Drama". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on May 10, 2014. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  39. ^ a b Weintraub, Steve (March 13, 2014). "Screenwriters Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely Talk Agent Carter TV Series; Reveal Timeline, Plot and Planned Episode Count". Collider. Archived from the original on March 13, 2014. Retrieved March 13, 2014. 
  40. ^ Andreeva, Natalie (April 12, 2014). "Pilots 2014: Early Buzz Edition". Deadline.com. Archived from the original on April 14, 2014. Retrieved April 14, 2014. 
  41. ^ Hibberd, James (May 8, 2014). "ABC renews 'SHIELD' plus orders 'Captain America' spin-off". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on May 9, 2014. Retrieved May 8, 2014. 
  42. ^ Hughes, Jason (May 16, 2014). "Hayley Atwell Reveals 'Marvel's Agent Carter' Will Have 8-Episode Run on ABC (Video)". The Wrap. Archived from the original on May 17, 2014. Retrieved May 17, 2014. 
  43. ^ Goldberg, Lesley (May 7, 2015). "ABC Renews 'Agents of SHIELD,' 'Agent Carter'". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on May 8, 2015. Retrieved May 7, 2015. 
  44. ^ Finbow, Kelly (May 23, 2015). "Hayley Atwell reveals Agent Carter season 2 will consist of 10 episodes". Digital Spy. Archived from the original on May 23, 2015. Retrieved May 23, 2015. 
  45. ^ a b Abrams, Natalie (March 2, 2016). "Agent Carter postmortem: Who (may have) paid the ultimate price?". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved March 3, 2016. 
  46. ^ Goldberg, Lesley (May 12, 2016). "'Agent Carter' Canceled at ABC". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on May 13, 2016. Retrieved May 12, 2016. 
  47. ^ Nededog, Jethro (August 8, 2016). "Marvel TV boss: I 'don't understand' why 'Agent Carter' was canceled". Business Insider. Archived from the original on August 10, 2016. Retrieved August 10, 2016. 
  48. ^ Mitovitch, Matt Webb (August 9, 2016). "Agent Carter: Marvel TV Boss Wants Revival". TV Line. Archived from the original on August 10, 2016. Retrieved August 10, 2016. 
  49. ^ Hibberd, James (July 27, 2016). "Netflix: Why we didn't rescue Agent Carter". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on July 28, 2016. Retrieved July 27, 2016. 
  50. ^ Goldman, Eric (March 1, 2016). "Hayley Atwell Previews Agent Carter's Big Season 2 Finale". IGN. Archived from the original on March 2, 2016. Retrieved March 2, 2016. 
  51. ^ Goldman, Eric (March 1, 2016). "Agent Carter Co-Showrunner On Season 2's Cliffhanger And What Could Come Next". IGN. Archived from the original on March 2, 2016. Retrieved March 3, 2016. 
  52. ^ Maslow, Nick (June 2, 2016). "Hayley Atwell is '100 percent' up for bringing Agent Carter back". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on June 3, 2016. Retrieved June 3, 2016. 
  53. ^ Ching, Albert (August 29, 2014). "Atwell And Producers Release Intel On "Agent Carter"". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on August 31, 2014. Retrieved August 30, 2014. 
  54. ^ a b c Foutch, Haleigh (January 28, 2015). "Stephen McFeely and Christopher Markus Talk Captain America: Civil War and Agent Carter". Collider. Archived from the original on January 31, 2015. Retrieved January 31, 2015. 
  55. ^ a b Mitovitch, Matt Webb (January 27, 2015). "Agent Carter Bosses Discuss Peggy's Triple Life (and New Love?), Stark's Secret Agenda and a 'Hopeful' Finale". TV Line. Archived from the original on April 25, 2017. Retrieved April 25, 2017. 
  56. ^ a b Goldberg, Lesley (January 5, 2015). "'Agent Carter' Showrunners Grilled By 'Arrow' Producer in Honest, Wide-Ranging Interview". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on January 7, 2015. Retrieved January 7, 2015. 
  57. ^ a b Brooks, Tamara (March 6, 2015). "GUGGENHEIM, BUTTERS ON "AGENT CARTER'S" FUTURE, "ARROW'S" ROGUES & MORE". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on March 7, 2015. Retrieved March 7, 2015. 
  58. ^ Ratcliffe, Amy (July 10, 2015). "Comic-Con: Agent Carter Is Headed To Hollywood". IGN. Archived from the original on July 16, 2015. Retrieved July 16, 2015. 
  59. ^ Nissim, Mayer (October 2, 2013). "Exclusive: Hayley Atwell: 'I'd definitely do Agent Carter TV show'". Digital Spy. Archived from the original on May 10, 2014. Retrieved October 2, 2013. 
  60. ^ a b Weseman, Lisa (January 7, 2015). "Meet the Costume Designer Behind Agent Carter". ABC.com. Archived from the original on January 11, 2015. Retrieved January 11, 2015. 
  61. ^ a b Kucharski, Joe (January 5, 2015). "Sneak Peek at The Costumes of Marvel's Agent Carter!". Tyranny of Style. Archived from the original on January 11, 2015. Retrieved January 11, 2015. 
  62. ^ Viscardi, James (February 3, 2015). "Agent Carter EPs On Leviathan, Stark Forming S.H.I.E.L.D. & Easter Eggs". ComicBook.com. Archived from the original on February 6, 2015. Retrieved February 6, 2015. 
  63. ^ Boone, John (July 15, 2015). "We Asked Marvel's Head of Television About Everything From 'Agent Carter' to 'Iron Fist' — And He Answered". Entertainment Tonight. Archived from the original on July 16, 2015. Retrieved July 16, 2015. 
  64. ^ Topel, Fred (August 6, 2015). "Exclusive: 'Marvel's Agent Carter' Producers on Season Two Villain, Hollywood Setting, and Action". /Film. Archived from the original on August 7, 2015. Retrieved August 7, 2015. 
  65. ^ "Beristain Brings 1940s Hollywood into the Digital Era for Agent Carter". American Society of Cinematographers. January 14, 2015. Archived from the original on January 17, 2015. Retrieved January 17, 2015. 
  66. ^ Anderson, Kyle (September 24, 2014). "Marvel's Louis D'Esposito Talks Agent Carter". Nerdist. Archived from the original on November 27, 2014. Retrieved November 27, 2014. 
  67. ^ "Edward J. Pei, ASC" (PDF). Gersh Productions. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 21, 2016. Retrieved January 21, 2016. 
  68. ^ O'Neill, Casey. "Resume". CaseyO'Neill.com. Archived from the original on January 21, 2016. Retrieved January 21, 2016. 
  69. ^ Marvel Entertainment (January 20, 2016). Planning a Bank Heist – Marvel's Agent Carter. YouTube. Retrieved January 21, 2016. 
  70. ^ "Agent Carter Case Study". Perception. Archived from the original on November 27, 2014. Retrieved November 27, 2014. 
  71. ^ Frei, Vincent (January 6, 2015). "Agent Carter". Art of VFX. Archived from the original on January 11, 2015. Retrieved January 11, 2015. 
  72. ^ a b Romanello, Linda (April 1, 2015). "VFX For TV: 'Agent Carter'". Post Magazine. Archived from the original on January 21, 2016. Retrieved January 21, 2016. 
  73. ^ a b Hill, Libby (February 29, 2016). "Forget CGI effects, 'Marvel's Agent Carter' makeup artists use vintage techniques". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on March 2, 2016. Retrieved March 3, 2016. 
  74. ^ Burlingame, Russ (June 21, 2014). "Agent Carter One-Shot Composer Likely Headed to the TV Series". Comicbook.com. Archived from the original on September 27, 2014. Retrieved September 27, 2014. 
  75. ^ "Christopher Lennertz to Score Marvel's 'Agent Carter' TV Series". Film Music Reporter. September 4, 2014. Archived from the original on September 27, 2014. Retrieved September 27, 2014. 
  76. ^ Huver, Scott (February 23, 2015). "'Agent Carter' Composer Christopher Lennertz on Big Music & Peggy's 'Bravado'". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on February 24, 2015. Retrieved February 23, 2015. 
  77. ^ "Marvel's Agent Carter: Season 1 (Original Television Soundtrack)". iTunes. December 11, 2015. Archived from the original on January 20, 2016. Retrieved January 21, 2016. 
  78. ^ "Whatcha Gonna Do (It's Up to You) [From "Agent Carter" Season 2] – Single". iTunes. March 18, 2016. Archived from the original on March 23, 2016. Retrieved March 24, 2016. 
  79. ^ "Agent Carter's Showrunner Spills What's Next For Our New Favorite Spy". io9. January 12, 2015. Archived from the original on January 17, 2015. Retrieved January 17, 2015. 
  80. ^ Goldman, Eric (January 18, 2016). "Agent Carter Producers Talk Season 2 Going Noir And Touching Upon Doctor Strange's World". IGN. Archived from the original on January 19, 2016. Retrieved January 19, 2016. 
  81. ^ Goldman, Eric (July 16, 2014). "Marvel's Agent Carter Will Show Peggy's Road To SHIELD". IGN. Archived from the original on July 17, 2014. Retrieved July 1, 2014. 
  82. ^ Strom, Marc (February 3, 2015). "Marvel's Agent Carter Explores the Origins of the Black Widow Program". Marvel.com. Archived from the original on February 5, 2015. Retrieved February 5, 2015. 
  83. ^ Abrams, Natalie (February 25, 2015). "Captain America writers on surprise Agent Carter cameo". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on February 28, 2015. Retrieved February 28, 2015. 
  84. ^ Abrams, Natalie (February 25, 2015). "Agent Carter bosses on Peggy's closure, Captain America ties, and the future". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on February 28, 2015. Retrieved February 28, 2015. 
  85. ^ Ratcliffe, Amy (January 12, 2016). ""Agent Carter" Showrunners Explain Peggy's Friendship With Jarvis, Madame Masque's Role". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on January 12, 2016. Retrieved January 12, 2016. 
  86. ^ a b Lambert, David (September 16, 2015). "Agent Carter – 'The Complete 1st Season' Bonus Material is Uncovered". TVShowsOnDVD.com. Archived from the original on September 17, 2015. Retrieved September 17, 2015. 
  87. ^ "Marvel's Agent Carter – Season 1 [DVD] [2015]". Amazon.co.uk. Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  88. ^ Agent Carter: The Complete First Season Blu-ray, retrieved September 21, 2016 
  89. ^ Markus, Christopher (December 5, 2016), Marvel's Agent Carter - Season 2, Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment, retrieved September 21, 2016 
  90. ^ Strom, Marc (December 11, 2014). "Marvel's Agent Carter Debriefs Her First 2 Missions". Marvel.com. Archived from the original on December 11, 2014. Retrieved December 11, 2014. 
  91. ^ "(#103) "Time and Tide"". The Futon Critic. Retrieved January 3, 2015. 
  92. ^ "CTV Powers Up With Acquisition of 11 New Series for 2014/15 Primetime Lineup". CTV Television Network. May 23, 2014. Archived from the original on October 6, 2014. Retrieved October 6, 2014. 
  93. ^ Walker, David (February 3, 2015). "Hayley Atwell dishes on new series Agent Carter". Stuff.co.nz. Fairfax Digital. Archived from the original on February 5, 2015. Retrieved February 5, 2015. 
  94. ^ Mellor, Louisa (October 29, 2014). "Channel 4 has "no plans for Agent Carter" in the UK". Den of Geek. Archived from the original on December 30, 2014. Retrieved December 31, 2014. 
  95. ^ Jeffery, Morgan (June 3, 2015). "Marvel's Agent Carter is finally coming to the UK this July". Digital Spy. Retrieved June 5, 2015. 
  96. ^ Jeffery, Morgan (June 4, 2015). "Find out when Marvel's Agent Carter will air in the UK". Digital Spy. Archived from the original on July 19, 2015. Retrieved July 19, 2015. 
  97. ^ Knox, David (February 22, 2016). "Returning: Once Upon a Time, The Amazing Race, The Muppets, Mindy Project". TV Tonight. Archived from the original on February 22, 2016. Retrieved February 22, 2016. 
  98. ^ Bibel, Sara (June 8, 2015). "Live+7 Ratings: Complete 2014–15 Season 'The Big Bang Theory' Leads Adults 18-49 Ratings Increase; 'The Messengers' Earns Biggest Percentage Increase, 'The Blacklist' Tops Viewership Gains". TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on June 27, 2015. Retrieved June 15, 2015. 
  99. ^ a b "MARVEL'S AGENT CARTER: SEASON 1". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved January 7, 2015. 
  100. ^ a b "Agent Carter : Season 1". metacritic.com. Metacritic. Retrieved January 17, 2015. 
  101. ^ de Moraes, Lisa (May 26, 2016). "Full 2015–16 TV Season Series Rankings: 'Blindspot', 'Life In Pieces' & 'Quantico' Lead Newcomers". Deadline.com. Archived from the original on May 27, 2016. Retrieved May 27, 2016. 
  102. ^ a b "Marvel's Agent Carter: Season 2 (2016)". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved February 4, 2016. 
  103. ^ a b Ryan, Maureen (March 1, 2016). "Why 'Marvel's Agent Carter' Should Battle On". Variety. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved March 3, 2016. 
  104. ^ Damore, Meagan (May 14, 2016). "Saying Goodbye to Marvel's "Agent Carter"". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on May 15, 2016. Retrieved May 15, 2016. 
  105. ^ "The 41st Annual Saturn Awards Winners 2015". Saturn Awards. Archived from the original on June 27, 2015. Retrieved June 27, 2015. 
  106. ^ "2014-15: The Season of Olive Kitteridge". OFTA. Archived from the original on August 13, 2016. Retrieved August 13, 2016. 
  107. ^ Hipes, Patrick (January 12, 2016). "VES Awards: 'Star Wars', 'The Martian' & 'The Walk' Among Nominees". Deadline.com. Archived from the original on January 12, 2016. Retrieved January 13, 2016. 
  108. ^ Carolyn, Giardina (January 13, 2016). "'Mad Max' Leads Makeup Artists and Hair Stylists Guild Award Nominees". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on January 21, 2016. Retrieved January 21, 2016. 
  109. ^ Mueller, Matthew (February 24, 2016). "Saturn Awards 2016 Nominees Announced". Comicbook.com. Archived from the original on February 24, 2016. Retrieved February 24, 2016. 

External links[edit]