Aggregate (geology)

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Lapis lazuli from Afghanistan
Gravel pit in Germany
Soil aggregate in Spain

In the Earth sciences, aggregrate has three possible meanings.

In mineralogy and petrology, an aggregate is a mass of mineral crystals, mineraloid particles or rock particles.[1][2] Examples are dolomite rock, which is an aggregate of crystals of the mineral dolomite,[3] and rock gypsum, an aggregate of crystals of the mineral gypsum.[4] Lapis lazuli is a type of rock composed of an aggregate of crystals of many minerals including lazurite, pyrite, phlogopite, calcite, potassium feldspar, wollastonite and some sodalite group minerals.[5]

In the construction industry, an aggregate (often referred to as a construction aggregate) is sand, gravel or crushed rock that has been mined or quarried for use as a building material.

In pedology, an aggregate is a mass of soil particles. If the aggregate has formed naturally, it can be called a ped; if formed artificially, it can be called a clod.[6]

Construction aggregate examples[edit]

Use in industry[edit]

Aggregates are used extensively in the construction industry[9][10] Often in making concrete, a construction aggregate is used,[4] with about 6 billion tons of concrete produced per year.[11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Neuendorf, K.K.E.; Mehl, Jr., J.P.; Jackson, J.A. (editors) (2005). Glossary of Geology (5th edition). Alexandria, Virginia: American Geological Institute. p. 11.
  2. ^ Abel, Mara; Lorenzatti, Alexandre; Rama Fiorini, Sandro; Carbonera, Joel (2015). Ontological analysis of the lithology data in PPDM well core model (PDF). PNEC Conferences. Houston. p. 3. Retrieved 27 March 2017.
  3. ^ Teichert, Curt (1965). Devonian Rocks and Paleogeography of Arizona (US Geological Survey Professional Paper 464) (PDF). Washington DC: USGS. p. 150.
  4. ^ a b Jessica Elzea Kogel (2006). Industrial Minerals & Rocks: Commodities, Markets, and Uses (7th edition). SME. p. 522. ISBN 978-0-87335-233-8.
  5. ^ T. Calligaro, Y. Coquinot, L. Pichon and B. Moignard (2011). "Advances in elemental imaging of rocks using the AGLAE external microbeam". Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B. 269 (20): 2364–2372. doi:10.1016/j.nimb.2011.02.074.
  6. ^ Allaby, Ailsa; Allaby, Michael (1999). A Dictionary of Earth Sciences (2nd edition). Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-280079-5.
  7. ^ Same Day Aggregates: Types of Aggregates - Same Day Aggregates, accessdate: March 25, 2017
  8. ^ Indiana Mineral Aggregates Association | Carmel, IN: What are aggregates? - Indiana Mineral Aggregates Association | Carmel, IN, accessdate: March 25, 2017
  9. ^ Introduction (1): What are Aggregates? « Herefordshire & Worcestershire Earth Heritage Trust: Introduction (1): What are Aggregates? « Herefordshire & Worcestershire Earth Heritage Trust, accessdate: March 23, 2017
  10. ^ Define Aggregate at Dictionary.com: aggregate, accessdate: March 23, 2017
  11. ^ Qasrawi, Hisham; Marie, Iqbal (2013). "Towards Better Understanding of Concrete Containing Recycled Concrete Aggregate". Advances in Materials Science and Engineering. 2013. doi:10.1155/2013/636034.

External links[edit]