Agrimonia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Agrimony)
Jump to: navigation, search
Agrimonia
Agrimonia-eupatoria.JPG
Agrimonia eupatoria
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Rosales
Family: Rosaceae
Subfamily: Rosoideae
Tribe: Sanguisorbeae
Subtribe: Agrimoniinae
Genus: Agrimonia
Tourn. ex L.
Species

About 15 species; see text

Agrimonia (from the Greek ἀργεμώνη),[1] commonly known as agrimony, is a genus of 12–15 species of perennial herbaceous flowering plants in the family Rosaceae,[1] native to the temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere, with one species also in Africa. The species grow to between .5–2 m (1.6–6.6 ft) tall, with interrupted pinnate leaves, and tiny yellow flowers borne on a single (usually unbranched) spike.

Agrimonia species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including grizzled skipper (recorded on A. eupatoria) and large grizzled skipper.

Species[edit]

Uses[edit]

In the ancient times, it was used for foot baths and tired feet.[2] Agrimony[specify] has a long history of medicinal use. The English poet Michael Drayton once hailed it as an "all-heal" and through the ages it was considered a panacea.[citation needed] The ancient Greeks used agrimony to treat eye ailments, and it was made into brews for diarrhea and disorders of the gallbladder, liver, and kidneys.[citation needed] Anglo-Saxons made a solution from the leaves and seeds for healing wounds; this use continued through the Middle Ages and afterward, in a preparation called eau d'arquebusade, or "musket-shot water".[citation needed] It can has been added to tea as a spring tonic.[2]

Folklore[edit]

Traditional British folklore states that if a sprig of Agrimonia eupatoria was placed under a person's head, they would sleep until it was removed.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Wikisource Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Agrimony". Encyclopædia Britannica. 1 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 424. 
  2. ^ a b C. F. Leyel. Compassionate Herbs. Faber and Faber Limited. 
  3. ^ Encyclopedia of Folk Medicine: Old World and New World Traditions By Gabrielle Hatfield, p.310

External links[edit]

Media related to Agrimonia at Wikimedia Commons

Agrimonia at Wikibooks