Ah Pah Dam

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Ah Pah Dam
Ah Pah Dam project, Klamath river, 1951.svg
Approximate extent of the planned reservoir
Country United States
Location Humboldt County, Northern California
Status Unbuilt
Owner(s) U.S. Bureau of Reclamation
Dam and spillways
Type of dam Concrete thick arch
Impounds Klamath River
Height 813 ft (248 m)
Length 3,500 ft (1,100 m)
Reservoir
Total capacity 15,000,000 acre·ft (19 km3)
Catchment area 14,700 sq mi (38,000 km2)
Power station
Installed capacity 900–1,700 MW

Ah Pah Dam was a proposed dam on the Klamath River in the U.S. state of California proposed by the United States Bureau of Reclamation as part of its United Western Investigation study in 1951. It was to have been 813 feet (248 m) high and was to be located 12 miles (19 km) upstream of the river's mouth. It would stand almost as tall as the Transamerica Pyramid building in San Francisco, but would be much more massive. It would flood 40 miles (64 km) of the Trinity River, including the Yurok, Karuk and Hupa Indian Reservations, the lower Salmon River, and 70 miles (110 km) of the Klamath River, creating a reservoir with a volume of 15,000,000 acre feet (19 km3) – two-thirds of the size of Lake Mead, and becoming the largest reservoir in California. The water would flow by gravity through a tunnel 60 miles (97 km) long to the Sacramento River just above Redding and onward to Southern California, in an extreme diversion plan known as the Klamath Diversion. The tunnel would have been located near the southernmost extent of the reservoir. It was named in the language of the Yurok people.

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Coordinates: 41°25′19″N 123°56′09″W / 41.422038°N 123.935909°W / 41.422038; -123.935909