Ahmed Muhammad Daku

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Ahmed Muhammad Daku
Military Governor of Kano State
In office
27 August 1985 – 1987
Preceded by Hamza Abdullahi
Succeeded by Mohammed Umaru
Military Governor of Sokoto State
In office
December 1987 – August 1990
Preceded by Garba Mohammed
Succeeded by Bashir Salihi Magashi
Personal details
Born 1944

Colonel (later Brigadier General) Ahmed Muhammad Daku was appointed Governor of Kano State in Nigeria on 27 August 1985 at the start of the military regime of General Ibrahim Babangida, and was transferred to become Governor of Sokoto State from December 1987 to August 1990.[1]

Ahmed Muhammad Daku was born in Katsina.[2] After joining the army, he rose through the ranks, becoming commanding officer, Medium Regiment, Nigerian Army, Jos in 1982, and being appointed directing staff (senior division) Command and Staff College, Jaji (1982–85). He was promoted to brigade commander, 31 Field Artillery Brigade, Abeokuta in 1985.[3]

Lt. Colonel Ahmed Daku played a supportive role in the coup of August 27, 1985 when Major General Ibrahim Babangida took control from Major General Muhammadu Buhari.[4] Ahmed Muhammad Daku was appointed Governor of Kano State in Nigeria on 27 August 1985, and was transferred to become Governor of Sokoto State from December 1987 to August 1990.[1] He later became commander of 3rd Armoured Division, being replaced in September 1993 during the intrigues that brought General Sani Abacha to power.[5]

In 2002 he headed the Directorate of Pilgrims Affairs. He was said to be an upright and forthright man.[6] He was a contender for the Governorship of Katsina State in 2003.[7] In August 2009, Brigadier General Ahmed Daku said there was a lack of discipline in the country, and described education as the only solution to restore Nigeria's lost glory.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Nigerian States". WorldStatesmen. Archived from the original on 23 December 2009. Retrieved 2010-01-06. 
  2. ^ MAURICE ARCHIBONG (October 4, 2007). "Katsina: Splendid at Sallah and always". Daily Sun. Retrieved 2010-01-06. 
  3. ^ "In the news". Newswatch. 2003-10-03. Retrieved 2010-01-06. 
  4. ^ Nowa Omoigui. "THE PALACE COUP OF AUGUST 27, 1985 (PART 1)". Dawodu. Archived from the original on 2 January 2010. Retrieved 2010-01-06. 
  5. ^ Nowa Omoigui. "Nigeria: The Palace Coup of November 17, 1993". Dawodu. Archived from the original on 2 January 2010. Retrieved 2010-01-07. 
  6. ^ Ali M. Ali (2002-06-08). "SCORE-CARD!!!". ThisDay. Retrieved 2010-01-06. 
  7. ^ Constance Ikokwu (2002-08-18). "Battle for the North-west". ThisDay. Retrieved 2010-01-06. 
  8. ^ LAWAL IBRAHIM (19 August 2009). "Ex-milad blames Nigeria's problems on indiscipline". Daily Trust. Retrieved 2010-01-06.