Ahn Junghyo

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This is a Korean name; the family name is Ahn.
Ahn Junghyo
Born 1941 (age 74–75)
Language Korean
Nationality South Korean
Ethnicity Korean
Citizenship South Korean
Korean name
Hangul 안정효
Hanja 安定孝
Revised Romanization An Jeong-hyo
McCune–Reischauer An Chŏnghyo

Ahn Junghyo (This is the author's preferred Romanization per LTI Korea[1]) is a South Korean novelist and literary translator.[2]

Life[edit]

Ahn was born December 2, 1941 in Seoul, where he graduated from Sogang University with a BA in English literature in 1965. He worked as an English-language writer for the Korea Herald in 1964, and later served as a director for the Korea Times in 1975-1976. He was Editorial Director for the Korean Division of Encyclopædia Britannica from 1971 to 1974.[3]

Ahn made his debut as a translator in 1975, when he published a Korean translation of One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez which was serialized in the monthly Literature & Thought.[4] From that time until the late 1980s, he translated approximately 150 foreign works into Korean.

Work[edit]

Ahn's first novel was Of War and the Metropolis, now known as White War (하얀전쟁), which was published in 1983 to a chilly critical reception. It discussed his experiences as a Republic of Korea Army soldier in the Vietnam War. Ahn translated it into English and had it published in the United States, where it was released by Soho Publishing in 1989 under the title The White Badge. In 1992 it was also made into a film, White Badge, shot on location in Vietnam.[5] The book was then reissued in Korea as White War in 1993, and was received much more favorably than before.

In addition to his writing, Ahn is known as a translator.[4]

Works in Korean[edit]

  • White War (1983/1989)
  • Autumn Sea People (가을바다 사람들) (1993)
  • Silver Stallion (1990)
  • Kalssam (갈쌈) (1986)
  • The Life of the Hollywood Kid (헐리우드키드의 생애) (1992)

Awards[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Author Database". LTI Korea. Retrieved 25 December 2013. 
  2. ^ "안정효" biographical PDF available at LTI Korea Library or online at: http://klti.or.kr/ke_04_03_011.do#
  3. ^ Lee, Kyung-ho (1996). "Ahn, Jung-Hyo". Who's Who in Korean Literature. Seoul: Hollym. pp. 13–15. ISBN 1-56591-066-4. 
  4. ^ a b Korean Writers The Novelists. Minumsa Press. 2005. p. 9. 
  5. ^ Kagan, Richard C. (October 2000), "Disarming Memories: Japanese, Korean, and American Literature on the Vietnam War", Critical Asian Studies 32 (4), archived from the original on 2008-12-01, retrieved 2008-12-02 

External links[edit]