Ahrida Synagogue of Istanbul

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Ahrida Synagogue of Istanbul
Basic information
Geographic coordinates 41°01′58″N 28°56′44″E / 41.03278°N 28.94556°E / 41.03278; 28.94556Coordinates: 41°01′58″N 28°56′44″E / 41.03278°N 28.94556°E / 41.03278; 28.94556
Affiliation Judaism
Rite Sephardi
Cercle Balat
District Fatih
State Turkey
Province Istanbul
Status active

Ahrida (Ohrid) Synagogue (Hebrew: בית הכנסת אכרידה‎) is one of the oldest[citation needed] synagogues in Istanbul, Turkey. It is located in Balat, once a thriving Jewish quarter in the city.

History[edit]

It was built by Romaniotes (Greek Jews), from the city of Ohrid (called 'Ahrid' in Greek) in what was then the Ottoman Empire and is now the Republic of Macedonia. Neve Shalom is said to have moved to Constantinople more than 550 years ago[clarification needed]. Sephardi Jews arrived in the Ottoman Empire from the Iberian peninsula beginning in 1492, and soon were a larger group of Jews in population than the Romaniotes. The Romaniotes of Istanbul, as in many communities, including Thessaloniki became assimilated into the Sephardic culture and adopted the Sephardic liturgy as well as the language of the Sephardim, Judesmo. The synagogue building, one of the two ancient synagogues in Istanbul's Golden Horn, was renovated in 1992 by the Quincentennial Foundation, in celebration of the 500th anniversary of Sephardic Jews' arrival in the Ottoman Empire. Ahrida Synagogue is known for its boat-shaped tevah (the reading platform, known in Ashkenazi communities as a bimah).[1] Ahrida Synagogue is also the only synagogue in Istanbul at which Sabbatai Zevi, founder of the Jewish Sabbatean movement, prayed.[2]

See also[edit]

References and notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Chief Rabbinate of Turkey (Türkiye Hahambaşılığı)". Archived from the original on 15 March 2007. Retrieved 22 April 2007. 
  2. ^ "Istanbul-Sacred Places-Ahrida Synagogue (Turkish)". Archived from the original on 27 September 2007. Retrieved 22 April 2007. 

External links[edit]