Ai Ore!

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Ai Ore!
Ai Ore vol1.jpg
Cover of the first Japanese volume
Manga
Ai o Utau Yori Ore ni Oborero!
Written by Mayu Shinjo
Published by Shogakukan
English publisher
Demographic Shōjo
Magazine Shōjo Comic
Original run 20062009
Volumes 3
Manga
Ai-Ore! Danshikō no Hime to Joshikō no Ōji
Written by Mayu Shinjo
Published by Kadokawa Shoten
English publisher
Madman Entertainment
Viz Media
Demographic Shōjo
Magazine Monthly Asuka
Original run May 26, 2008December 24, 2010
Volumes 5
Live-action film
Directed by Sakurako Fukuyama
Written by Kamura Junko, Fujihira Hisako, Fukuyama Sakurako
Released August 25, 2012 (2012-08-25)
Runtime 91 minutes
Wikipe-tan face.svg Anime and Manga portal

Ai Ore! (Japanese: 愛を歌うより俺に溺れろ!, Hepburn: Ai o Utau Yori Ore ni Oborero!?) is a Japanese manga series by Mayu Shinjo. It was adapted into a live action film in 2012.

Plot[edit]

Ai o Utau Yori Ore Ni Oborero![edit]

Akira Shiraishi, a young high school boy with feminine features, joins Blaue Rosen, the all-girl band that Mizuki Sakurazaka, an androgynous girl of the same age, performs lead electric guitar in.

Their high school life is anything but typical: Mizuki is the "prince" of her all-girl school while Akira is the "princess" of the neighboring all-boy school. A series of comical events brings them closer together, even as the prejudice of the people around them tries to pull them apart.

Ai-Ore! Danshikō no Hime to Joshikō no Ōji[edit]

After announcing that he is a boy during a concert for blue rosen in the first book Akira and Mizuki begin to date but so does the feud between the two's schools.

Publication[edit]

Written and illustrated by Mayu Shinjo, Ai o Utau Yori Ore ni Oborero! was serialized in Shogakukan's Shōjo Comic magazine. Its chapters were compilled into five tankōbon volumes published from June 26, 2006 to July 26, 2007.[1][2] A second series titled Ai Ore! –Love Me (愛俺! ~男子校の姫と女子校の王子~, Ai-Ore! Danshikō no Hime to Joshikō no Ōji?) was serialized in Monthly Asuka by Kadokawa Shoten and was published into tankobon format between May 22, 2008 to February 22, 2011.[3][4] As it published Ai Ore!, Kadokawa Shoten also republished the first series into three volumes from February 23 to April 22, 2010.[5][6]

When translating into English Viz Media combined the two series, with the first series collected into the three first volumes and the second series compilled in the remaining five books.[7] Its first volume was published on May 3, 2011 while the last one was released on February 5, 2013.[8][9] Viz also published a digital edition from June 17, 2011 to March 8, 2013.[8][9] The two series were also published in Australia by Madman Entertainment,[10][11] France by Pika Édition[12][13] and in Germany by Egmont Manga & Anime.[14][15]

Shogakukan version[edit]

No. Japanese release date Japanese ISBN
1 June 26, 2006[1] ISBN 4091304702
2 November 26, 2006[16] ISBN 4091305792
3 December 21, 2006[17] ISBN 4091307388
4 April 26, 2007[18] ISBN 9784091310248
5 July 26, 2007[2] ISBN 9784091311368

Kadokawa Shoten and Viz Media version[edit]

No. Original release date Original ISBN English release date English ISBN
1 February 23, 2010[5] ISBN 978-4-04-854437-5 May 3, 2011[8] ISBN 978-1421538389
2 March 19, 2010[19] ISBN 978-4-04-854446-7 August 2, 2011[20] ISBN 978-1421538396
3 April 22, 2011[6] ISBN 978-4-04-854469-6 November 1, 2011[21] ISBN 978-1421538402
4 May 22, 2008[3] ISBN 978-4-04-854176-3 February 7, 2012[22] ISBN 978-1421538730
5 August 22, 2008[23] ISBN 978-4-04-854229-6 May 1, 2012[24] ISBN 978-1421538747
6 February 23, 2009[25] ISBN 978-4-04-854289-0 August 7, 2012[26] ISBN 978-1421538754
7 February 23, 2010[27] ISBN 978-4-04-854438-2 November 6, 2012[28] ISBN 978-1421538761
8 February 24, 2011[4] ISBN 978-4-04-854592-1 February 5, 2013[9] ISBN 978-1421541990

Anime[edit]

Along with the official announcement for the live-action film, Shinjo Mayu revealed that the manga was supposed to have an anime adaptation but was canceled due to unfortunate events.

Live-action[edit]

A live-action film adaptation, that would premier in the end of 2011, was first announced by Mayu Shinjo through her blog in July 2011.[29] In January 2012, it was revealed that idol Karam from the K-pop band DGNA and actress Ito Ōno would star it.[30] The film opened on August 25, 2012[31] and 2,000 copies of a "special mini-comic" by Shinjo herself were distributed.[32] The film is directed by Sakurako Fukuyama and its main theme is "Ikenai 1-2-3" by DGNA.[33][31]

Cast[edit]

Reception[edit]

The volumes 1, 2, 4 and 5 from the English publication of the series have been featuring in lists of 10 best-selling manga rankings such as The New York Times.[34][35][36][37]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "愛を歌うより俺に溺れろ! 1" (in Japanese). Shogakukan. Retrieved March 29, 2016. 
  2. ^ a b "愛を歌うより俺に溺れろ! 5" (in Japanese). Shogakukan. Retrieved March 29, 2016. 
  3. ^ a b "愛俺! ~男子校の姫と女子校の王子~ 第1巻" (in Japanese). Kadokawa Shoten. Retrieved March 29, 2016. 
  4. ^ a b "愛俺! ~男子校の姫と女子校の王子~ 第5巻" (in Japanese). Kadokawa Shoten. Retrieved March 29, 2016. 
  5. ^ a b "愛を歌うより俺に溺れろ! 第1巻" (in Japanese). Kadokawa Shoten. Retrieved March 29, 2016. 
  6. ^ a b "愛を歌うより俺に溺れろ! 第3巻" (in Japanese). Kadokawa Shoten. Retrieved March 29, 2016. 
  7. ^ "Viz Confirms License for Both Ai Ore! Manga Series". Anime News Network. July 21, 2011. Retrieved January 29, 2012. 
  8. ^ a b c "Ai Ore!, Volume 1". Viz Media. Retrieved March 29, 2016. 
  9. ^ a b c "Ai Ore!, Volume 8". Viz Media. Retrieved March 29, 2016. 
  10. ^ "Ai Ore! (Manga) Vol. 01". Madman Entertainment. Retrieved March 29, 2016. 
  11. ^ "Ai Ore! (Manga) Vol. 08". Madman Entertainment. Retrieved March 29, 2016. 
  12. ^ "Blaue rosen" (in French). Pika Édition. Archived from the original on August 14, 2013. Retrieved March 29, 2015. 
  13. ^ "Blaue rosen-saison 2" (in French). Pika Édition. Archived from the original on August 14, 2013. Retrieved March 29, 2015. 
  14. ^ "Ai Ore! Love me!" (in German). Egmont Manga & Anime. Archived from the original on May 23, 2013. Retrieved March 29, 2015. 
  15. ^ "Blaue Rosen" (in French). Egmont Manga & Anime. Archived from the original on March 4, 2012. Retrieved March 29, 2015. 
  16. ^ "愛を歌うより俺に溺れろ! 2" (in Japanese). Shogakukan. Retrieved March 29, 2016. 
  17. ^ "愛を歌うより俺に溺れろ! 3" (in Japanese). Shogakukan. Retrieved March 29, 2016. 
  18. ^ "愛を歌うより俺に溺れろ! 4" (in Japanese). Shogakukan. Retrieved March 29, 2016. 
  19. ^ "愛を歌うより俺に溺れろ! 第2巻" (in Japanese). Kadokawa Shoten. Retrieved March 29, 2016. 
  20. ^ "Ai Ore!, Volume 2". Viz Media. Retrieved March 29, 2016. 
  21. ^ "Ai Ore!, Volume 3". Viz Media. Retrieved March 29, 2016. 
  22. ^ "Ai Ore!, Volume 4". Viz Media. Retrieved March 29, 2016. 
  23. ^ "愛俺! ~男子校の姫と女子校の王子~ 第2巻" (in Japanese). Kadokawa Shoten. Retrieved March 29, 2016. 
  24. ^ "Ai Ore!, Volume 5". Viz Media. Retrieved March 29, 2016. 
  25. ^ "愛俺! ~男子校の姫と女子校の王子~ 第3巻" (in Japanese). Kadokawa Shoten. Retrieved March 29, 2016. 
  26. ^ "Ai Ore!, Volume 6". Viz Media. Retrieved March 29, 2016. 
  27. ^ "愛俺! ~男子校の姫と女子校の王子~ 第4巻" (in Japanese). Kadokawa Shoten. Retrieved March 29, 2016. 
  28. ^ "Ai Ore!, Volume 7". Viz Media. Retrieved March 29, 2016. 
  29. ^ "Mayu Shinjo's Ai Ore! Manga Gets Live-Action Film". Anime News Network. July 21, 2011. Retrieved January 29, 2012. 
  30. ^ "Ai Ore! Manga's Film Headlined by Karam of K-Pop's DGNA". Anime News Network. January 19, 2012. Retrieved March 29, 2016. 
  31. ^ a b "Live-Action Ai Ore! Film's TV Spot Streamed". Anime News Network. August 27, 2012. Retrieved March 29, 2016. 
  32. ^ "2,000 Ai Ore! Movie-Goers to Get Mini-Comic Drawn by Shinjo". Anime News Network. August 23, 2012. Retrieved March 29, 2016. 
  33. ^ "映画『愛を歌うより俺に溺れろ!』" (in Japanese). Ai Ore! movie official website. Archived from the original on September 19, 2012. Retrieved March 30, 2016. 
  34. ^ "Manga Best Seller List". The New York Times. May 29, 2011. Retrieved March 29, 2016. 
  35. ^ "Manga Best Seller List". The New York Times. August 28, 2011. Retrieved March 29, 2016. 
  36. ^ "Manga Best Seller List". The New York Times. March 11, 2012. Retrieved March 29, 2016. 
  37. ^ "Manga Best Seller List". The New York Times. June 3, 2012. Retrieved March 29, 2016. 

External links[edit]