Aimee Mayo

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Aimee Mayo
Mayo in 2020
Mayo in 2020
Background information
Born (1971-09-28) September 28, 1971 (age 51)
OriginGadsden, Alabama, United States
GenresCountry
Occupation(s)
  • Songwriter
  • author
Years active1995–present
Websiteaimeemayo.com
OrganizationLittle Blue Typewriter Music
SpouseChris Lindsey
Children3
RelativesDanny Mayo (father), Cory Mayo (brother)

Aimee Mayo is a Grammy Award-nominated songwriter from Gadsden, Alabama.[1]

Biography[edit]

Aimee Mayo grew up in Gadsden, Alabama. She moved to Nashville when she was 17. She was signed as a songwriter with BMG There she met her husband Chris while she was still a teenager. When she was 28 she married fellow songwriter Chris Lindsey, they have four children and live in Nashville, Tennessee. Aimee and Chris also own their own recording studio in Nashville Tennessee called Aimeeland. There, Taylor Swift recorded her third studio album Speak Now (2010) and Keith Urban recorded his seventh studio album Get Closer (2010).

As a teen, Aimee was surrounded by music. Her father Danny Mayo wrote hits for numerous hits like "Feed Jake" and "Keeper of the Stars". Her brother Cory Mayo wrote "You'll Be There", a hit for George Strait in 2005. As of 2008, Mayo's songs have spent twenty-five weeks in the #1 spot on the Billboard charts, and albums featuring her songs have sold over 135 million units worldwide.

Her songs have spent twenty-six weeks on the #1 spot on the Billboard charts, and albums featuring her songs have sold over 155 million units worldwide. She is primarily known for writing hits for artists such as Taylor Swift, Tim McGraw, Lonestar, Meghan Trainor, the Civil Wars, Backstreet Boys, Adam Lambert Kenny Chesney, Carrie Underwood Martina McBride, Sara Evans, Faith Hill, Blake Shelton, Boyz II Men, Brad Paisley, Billy Currington, Kellie Pickler and more. Mayo is one of the few female artist to receive both BMI's Country Song of the Year and Songwriter of the Year awards, putting her in the rare company of Dolly Parton and Taylor Swift. Mayo was also a judge on the CMT reality-competition show, Can You Duet. In 2020, Mayo released a memoir titled Talking to the Sky

Mayo was named BMI Songwriter of the Year in 2000. "Amazed", recorded by Lonestar that same year, is her most popular song to date. In 2004 it garnered a 5 Millionaire award from BMI, vaulting it into the top 125 songs in the BMI catalog out of 6.5 million works. "Amazed" also won ACM (Academy of Country Music) Song of the Year, BMI Song of the Year, NSAI Song of the Year and was nominated for a Grammy. "Amazed" crossed over to the pop charts and spent two weeks at the top of the Hot 100, making it the first country song to accomplish such a feat since Dolly Parton and Kenny Rogers with their 1983 song "Islands in the Stream".[2]

Mayo's song "This One’s for the Girls," recorded by Martina McBride, stayed at #1 on Billboard's Adult Contemporary chart for eleven weeks in addition to reaching number three on the country chart.[3] The song also went on to be a theme song for the morning show The View, Mayo has received over a dozen BMI Country awards along with BMI Pop Awards for "Amazed" and "This One's for the Girls".

Mayo co-wrote the song "Wheel of the World" on Carrie Underwood’s second studio album with husband Chris Lindsey and close friend and collaborator Hillary Lindsey. The title Carnival Ride was chosen by Underwood from the lyrics of "Wheel of the World."[4]

Mayo was a judge on the CMT television series, Can You Duet.

Discography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Papadatos, Markos (2020-12-05). "Songwriter Aimee Mayo talks about 'Talking to the Sky' book (Includes interview)". Digital Journal. Retrieved 2022-10-16.
  2. ^ "SongwriterUniverse Magazine". Archived from the original on 17 October 2007. Retrieved 2007-10-22.
  3. ^ Rogers, L. "Glencoe's Aimee and Cory Mayo follow their father's success in Nashville", The Gadsden Times, October 12, 2007.
  4. ^ "Carrie's Official Bio". Archived from the original on 23 October 2007. Retrieved 2007-10-22.

External links[edit]