Aindrias Ó Caoimh (attorney general)

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Aindrias Ó Caoimh
Judge of the European Court of Justice
In office
10 February 1975 – 13 July 1985
Nominated byGovernment of Ireland
Appointed byEuropean Council
President of the High Court
In office
11 May 1966 – 2 February 1975
Nominated byGovernment of Ireland
Appointed byCearbhall Ó Dálaigh
Preceded byCahir Davitt
Succeeded byThomas Finlay
Judge of the High Court
In office
11 May 1966 – 2 February 1975
Nominated byGovernment of Ireland
Appointed byCearbhall Ó Dálaigh
13th Attorney General of Ireland
In office
20 March 1957 – 15 March 1965[1]
TaoiseachÉamon de Valera
Seán Lemass
Preceded byPatrick McGilligan
Succeeded byColm Condon
In office
30 January 1954 – 2 June 1954[1]
TaoiseachÉamon de Valera
Preceded byThomas Teevan
Succeeded byPatrick McGilligan
Personal details
Born
Aindrias Micheál Ó Caoimh

(1912-10-04)4 October 1912
Galway, Ireland
Died30 December 1994(1994-12-30) (aged 82)
Ranelagh, Dublin, Ireland
NationalityIrish
Political partyFianna Fáil
Spouse(s)Sheila Ní Chuilleanáin
(m. 1933; d. 1994)
Relations
Children7, including Aindrias
Alma materKing's Inns

Aindrias Micheál Ó Caoimh (4 October 1912 – 30 December 1994) was an Irish judge and barrister who served as a Judge of the European Court of Justice from 1975 to 1985, President of the High Court and a Judge of the High Court from 1966 to 1975 and Attorney General of Ireland from January 1950 to June 1950 and 1957 to 1965.[2][3]

Family[edit]

He was a brother of Brian Ó Cuív and uncle of Éamon Ó Cuív. He and his wife Sheila had seven children,[4] one of whom, also Aindrias Ó Caoimh, was, like his father, appointed a member of the European Court of Justice, in 2004. Ó Caoimh died at his home in Ranelagh in Dublin, and is buried in Glasnevin Cemetery.[4]

Lawless v. Ireland[edit]

During his second term as Attorney General of Ireland he represented the Government of Ireland in Lawless v. Ireland (1957–1961), the first case before the European Court of Human Rights, taken by Gerald Lawless,[5] who was represented by Seán MacBride, the human rights lawyer.[6] The case concerned the detention without trial of a suspected member of the IRA who claimed that Ireland had breached Articles 5, 6 and 7 of the European Convention of Human Rights that provide rights to liberty and security, fair trial and the principle of ‘no punishment without law’.[7] The court found in favour of the Irish Government that no violation of the European Convention on Human Rights had taken place.[8]

Arms Trial[edit]

In September 1970, Ó Caoimh withdrew from the Arms Trial, with the result that the case had to be re-heard after six days of evidence had already been given.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Gailearaí d'Ard-Aighní roimhe seo – 1954 go 1981". Attorney General of Ireland. 27 September 2007. Archived from the original on 16 March 2019. Retrieved 16 March 2019.
  2. ^ The Irish Times, 30 December 1994, p. 23.
  3. ^ Kenneth Ferguson, ed. (2005). King's Inns Barristers 1868–2004. Dublin: The Honorable Society of King's Inns in association with The Irish Legal History Society. p. 271. ISBN 0-9512443-2-9.
  4. ^ a b c Former High Court president dies, The Irish Times, 30 December 1994, p.5.
  5. ^ "Ceisteanna—Questions. Oral Answers. - Lawless Case Appearances". Dáil Éireann Parliamentary Debates - Volume 185. Oireachtas. 1960-12-07. Retrieved 2017-06-27.
  6. ^ "Sean MacBride (1904-1988)". Searc's Web Guide to 20th Century Ireland. searc.ie. 2008. Archived from the original on 2013-01-13. Retrieved 2007-08-22.
  7. ^ "The Lawless Papers". NUI Galway:. Archived from the original on 2013-12-24. Retrieved 2007-08-22.
  8. ^ "Judgment of the Court of Human Rights in the Lawless v Ireland(1 July 1961)". European Court of Human Rights. 1961-07-01. Retrieved 2009-03-23.

External links[edit]

Legal offices
Preceded by
Thomas Teevan
Attorney General of Ireland
1954–1954
Succeeded by
Patrick McGilligan
Preceded by
Patrick McGilligan
Attorney General of Ireland
1957–1965
Succeeded by
Colm Condon