Air Atlanta

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Air Atlanta
AirAtlanta1.png
IATA ICAO Callsign
CC CRB Airlan
Founded 1984
Ceased operations 1987
Hubs William B. Hartsfield Atlanta International Airport
Headquarters Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.

Air Atlanta was an airline based in Atlanta, Georgia, United States in the 1980s serving over a dozen cities from its hub in Atlanta.

History[edit]

The airline was started in February 1984, by attorneys Michael Hollis and Daniel Kolber. Besides operating point to point service as an independent air carrier, it also provided passenger feed for Pan American World Airways as "Air Atlanta Pan Am Express", connecting Pan Am passengers to and from flights operated by Air Atlanta.[1]

Air Atlanta's first scheduled route was Atlanta-Memphis with the first flight being operated on February 1, 1984, using a Boeing 727-100 jetliner. By April 1, 1984, nonstop 727 service was being operated Atlanta-Memphis, Atlanta-Miami and Atlanta-New York JFK Airport.[2] By July 1, 1985, Atlanta-New York LaGuardia Airport nonstop service had been added as well.[3] The airline subsequently introduced service to Detroit, Fort Myers, Greenbrier/Lewisburg, WV, New Orleans, Orlando, Philadelphia, Tampa and Washington, D.C. National Airport.[4]

When Air Atlanta initially began service, every seat was a first class seat with meals served on white linen, fine China and crystal. Air Atlanta then introduced two class service on its Boeing 727 aircraft with 2-2 seating in first class and 2-3 seating in coach with the latter cabin usually being configured with 3-3 seating by most other air carriers that operated the 727.[5] The airline flew three million passengers before it shut down on April 2, 1987, when it filed bankruptcy. At the time it filed, KLM offered to invest $10 million in Air Atlanta if the existing investors would match it. The existing investors declined even though Air Atlanta was making progress. Air Atlanta had a perfect safety record and was responsible for many innovations in the airline industry including with respect to financing its operations through the use of the zero coupon convertible note.[6][7]

Fleet[edit]

The Air Atlanta fleet began with five Boeing 727-100 aircraft. Five Boeing 727-200s were added as time passed.

Destinations[edit]

An Air Atlanta Boeing 727 at Miami International Airport in 1987.

Air Atlanta operated scheduled passenger flights to the following destinations during its existence:

The majority of the flights operated by Air Atlanta were operated to and from Atlanta (ATL) on a nonstop point to point basis.[9] Several exceptions were nonstop service operated between New York JFK Airport and Lewisburg, West Virginia, via the Greenbrier Valley Airport (LWB), between New York JFK Airport and Philadelphia (PHL) as well as between Tampa (TPA) and Orlando (MCO) and also between Tampa and Fort Myers (RSW).[10][1] In addition, Air Atlanta operated direct one stop service between a number of its destinations with most of these flights making an intermediate stop in Atlanta which also served as the airline's connecting hub.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Air Atlanta system timetable". www.departedflights.com. September 27, 1986. Retrieved 2016-06-06. 
  2. ^ http://www.departedflights.com, April 1, 1984 Air Atlanta system timetable
  3. ^ a b http://www.departedflights.com, July 1, 1985 Air Atlanta system timetable
  4. ^ http://www.timetableimages.com, Dec. 1, 1986 Air Atlanta system timetable
  5. ^ http://www.departedflights.com, 1984 Air Atlanta service brochures
  6. ^ "Black Owned Airline or Air Charter Service.". Archived from the original on 2006-03-16. Retrieved 2016-06-06. 
  7. ^ "Air Atlanta". www.airtimes.com. Retrieved 2016-06-06. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "Air Atlanta". AirTimes: A Collector's Guide to Airline Timetables. Archived from the original on 28 September 2007. Retrieved 2007-09-30. 
  9. ^ "Air Atlanta route map". www.departedflights.com. December 1, 1986. Retrieved 2016-06-06. 
  10. ^ "Air Atlanta system timetable". www.timetableimages.com. December 1, 1986. Retrieved 2016-06-06. 
  11. ^ http://www.departedflights.com, Dec. 1, 1986 Air Atlanta system timetable

External links[edit]