Air Djibouti

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Air Djibouti
Air Djibouti logo.svg
IATA ICAO Callsign
IV DJU AIR DJIB
Founded 1963
Commenced operations
  • 1964
  • 2015 (Relaunched)
Ceased operations 2002
Hubs Djibouti-Ambouli International Airport
Destinations Khartoum, Mogadishu, Addis Ababa, Dubai
Company slogan The Red Sea Airline
Headquarters Djibouti City
Key people
Website www.air-djibouti.com

Air Djibouti, also known as Red Sea Airlines, is the flag carrier of Djibouti.[2] It first flew in 1963 and ceased all operations 2002. In 2015 the airline was relaunched, first as a cargo airline and then, in 2016, with passenger services as well. It is headquartered in the capital, Djibouti City.[3][4]

History[edit]

An Air Djibouti McDonnell Douglas DC-9 leased from JAT Yugoslav Airlines (1991).
An Air Djibouti Boeing 737-200 at the Paris-Orly Airport (1980).
An Air Djibouti Airbus A310-200 at the Paris-Charles de Gaulle Airport (1999).

Air Djibouti was established in April 1963. Scheduled operations commenced in April of the following year, with a fleet of Bristol 170, De Havilland Dragon Rapide and Beechcraft Model 18 aircraft.[5] In 1970, the airline was taken over by the Air France subsidiary Air Somali, which was founded in 1962. Both airlines merged in 1971.[6] The company operated international scheduled flights to Aden, Asmara, Dire Dawa, Hargeisa, Mogadishu, Sanaa and Taizz. From April 1974 Air Djibouti had two airplanes of the Douglas DC-6 type, which operated on charter flights to Europe as well as for cargo shipments to Nairobi. The remaining Douglas DC-3 were replaced in 1975 by two De Havilland Canada DHC-6 Twin Otters. The newly independent Republic of Djibouti took a 62.5% share in the company in 1977. The state later acquired a 90% stake in the carrier when in early 1981 it bought additional shares from Air France. Air Djibouti ceased operations in 2002.

Relaunch[edit]

Air Djibouti was set to relaunch service in late 2015 and 2016[needs update] with Chairman Aboubaker Omar Hadi and CEO Mario Fulgoni. The company is also supported by South Wales based Cardiff Aviation.[7][8] In late 2015 Air Djibouti relaunched service with a Boeing 737 freighter. The government wishes to establish the country as a regional logistics and commercial hub for trade in East Africa, and chose to relaunch the airline as part of this plan.[8][9] The airline started regional services with the Boeing 737-400 on 16 August 2016 and planned to introduce two British Aerospace 146-300 aircraft before the end of 2016.[10][needs update]

Destinations[edit]

As of November 2016, Air Djibouti served the following list of destinations.

Country City Airport Notes Refs
Djibouti Djibouti City Djibouti–Ambouli International Airport Hub [11]
Ethiopia Addis Ababa Addis Ababa [11]
Ethiopia Dire Dawa Dire Dawa International Airport [11]
Somalia Berbera Berbera Airport [11]
Somalia Hargeisa Hargeisa Airport [11]

Fleet[edit]

Current[edit]

In August 2016 (2016-08), a 167-seater Boeing 737-400, owned by Cardiff Aviation, became Air Djibouti's first aircraft to be operated following the carrier's relaunch. [1][12][13]

As of August 2016, the Air Djibouti fleet consists of the following aircraft:

Aircraft In service On order Capacity Notes
Boeing 737-400 1 167[12] Operational since August 2016
Boeing 767-200ER 1[12] TBD Former SilverJet aircraft, to be delivered Nov 2016
British Aerospace 146-300 2[10] TBD to be delivered September/October 2016
Total 1 3

Historic Fleet[edit]

In the 1960s, the airline operated Douglas DC-3s, a Beechcraft Model 18, and a Beechcraft Musketeer.[3] In the early 1970s, the fleet also included a Douglas DC-6; the two Beechcrafts had been replaced by a Bell JetRanger helicopter, and a Piper Cherokee Six.[14]

From 1998 onwards, the Air Djibouti fleet consisted of a single Airbus A310 aircraft.[15]

Before operations were suspended Air Djibouti operated 1 Airbus A310 and 5 Boeing 737-200 aircraft.

Accidents and incidents[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Cardiff Aviation Delivers First Boeing 737 For New Air Djibouti Commercial Fleet". CAPA Centre for Aviation. 12 August 2016. Archived from the original on 2016-08-21. 
  2. ^ Dron, Alan (11 August 2016). "Africa's Air Djibouti continues re-fleeting". Air Transport World. Archived from the original on 2016-08-21. African flag carrier Air Djibouti has taken delivery of its first Boeing 737 as it prepares to launch commercial operations. 
  3. ^ a b "World Airline Survey", Flight International, 13 April 1967, p.554 (online archive version) retrieved 6 April 2011
  4. ^ Air Djibouti entry at airlineupdate.com
  5. ^ Encyclopedia of African Airlines, Ben R. Guttery , Jefferson 1998
  6. ^ "air france - boeing - 1984 - 0530 - Flight Archive". Retrieved 3 February 2016. 
  7. ^ Reuters Editorial (2 September 2015). "Air Djibouti, back from bankruptcy, sets sights on air freight". Reuters. Retrieved 3 February 2016. 
  8. ^ a b "Air Djibouti to commence cargo operations in late 2015". Retrieved 3 February 2016. 
  9. ^ "Djibouti has relaunched its national airline, with backing from Iron Maiden's lead singer - Business Insider". Business Insider. 4 August 2015. Retrieved 3 February 2016. 
  10. ^ a b "Air Djibouti Returns". Airliner World (October 2016): 10. 
  11. ^ a b c d e "Air Djibouti frontpage". Air Djibouti. Retrieved 18 November 2016. 
  12. ^ a b c Hoyle, Craig (10 August 2016). "PICTURE: Reborn Air Djibouti's first 737 gets airborne". London: Flightglobal. Archived from the original on 21 August 2016. 
  13. ^ Hoyle, Craig (9 August 2016). "Cardiff Aviation to deliver Air Djibouti 737-400". Cardiff: Flightglobal. Archived from the original on 2016-08-21. 
  14. ^ "World Airline Survey", Flight International, 22 March 1973, p.435 (online archive version) retrieved 6 April 2011
  15. ^ "Air Djibouti Fleet Details and History". Retrieved 3 February 2016. 
  16. ^ "F-OCKT Accident Description". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 14 February 2011. 
  17. ^ Harro Ranter (17 October 1977). "ASN Aircraft accident de Havilland Canada DHC-6 Twin Otter registration unknown Tadjoura Airport (TDJ)". Retrieved 3 February 2016. 

External links[edit]

Media related to Air Djibouti at Wikimedia Commons