Air Philippines Flight 541

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Air Philippines Flight 541
PK-RIM Boeing B.737 Mandala (8392085316).jpg
A similar 737-200 that involved the crash
Accident summary
Date April 19, 2000 (2000-04-19)
Summary Pilot error, Controlled flight into terrain
Site Island Garden City of Samal, Davao del Norte
07°09′24″N 125°42′03″E / 7.15667°N 125.70083°E / 7.15667; 125.70083Coordinates: 07°09′24″N 125°42′03″E / 7.15667°N 125.70083°E / 7.15667; 125.70083
Passengers 124
Crew 7
Fatalities 131 (all)
Survivors 0
Aircraft type Boeing 737-2H4
Operator Air Philippines
Registration RP-C3010
Flight origin Ninoy Aquino International Airport, Manila, Philippines
Destination Francisco Bangoy International Airport, Davao, Philippines

Air Philippines Flight 541 was a scheduled domestic flight operated by Air Philippines from Ninoy Aquino International Airport in Manila to Francisco Bangoy International Airport in Davao City, the Philippines. On April 19, 2000 the Boeing 737-2H4 crashed in Island Garden City of Samal, Davao del Norte while on approach to the airport, killing all 124 passengers and 7 crew members. It remains the deadliest air disaster in the Philippines and the second deadliest accident involving the Boeing 737-200 after Mandala Airlines Flight 091 which crashed 5 years later.[1]

Accident[edit]

The aircraft, a Boeing 737-2H4, registration RP-C3010, previously owned by Southwest Airlines as N50SW was first delivered in February 1978 and was solded to Air Philippines 20 years later.

On April 19, 2000, Air Philippines Flight 541, with 131 passengers and crew members, left Manila at 5:21 a.m., flying to Davao City, in South East Mindanao, about 600 miles southeast of Manila.

As it approached the airport at around 7 a.m., a Cebu Pacific DC-9 aircraft was on the runway prepare for take off to Cebu. Shortly later, Flight 541 began to circle in low clouds, waiting for the plane on the ground to move off the runway. As it circled, Flight 541 slammed into a coconut tree, 500 feet above sea level and crashes few miles west of the airport.[2] The plane later caught fire and disintegrated, no one survived the accident.

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