Airborne Tactical Advantage Company

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Airborne Tactical Advantage Company Aero L-39 Albatros

Airborne Tactical Advantage Company (ATAC), is a government contractor based in Newport News, Virginia, USA. It operates Mk-58 Hawker Hunter, Israeli F-21 Kfir, A-4 Skyhawk, and L-39 Albatross II military aircraft in tactical flight training roles for U.S. Navy, Air Force and Air National Guard.

Its main air operations base is at Naval Air Station Point Mugu, California.[1] It sends aircraft as far away as Naval Air Facility Atsugi in Japan.[2][3]

ATAC was acquired by Textron in 2016 and continues to operate as a subsidiary.[4]

Fleet[edit]

One IAI F-21 Kfir of ATAC in 2016.

The ATAC air fleet includes the following aircraft[5]

Accidents and incidents[edit]

8 July 2010
Douglas A-4 Skyhawk N123AT lost power during takeoff and crashed in a field near Naval Air Station Fallon. The pilot ejected safely. Investigations by the FAA and NTSB are completed.[7]
6 March 2012
IAI Kfir N404AX crashed into a building near at Naval Air Station Fallon in inclement weather, killing the pilot. Investigations by the FAA and NTSB are completed.[8]
18 May 2012
Hawker Hunter crashed in a field on final approach to Naval Air Station Point Mugu, killing the pilot. Investigations by the FAA and NTSB are currently underway.[9][10]
29 October 2013
Hawker Hunter N332AX crashed in a field near Naval Air Station Point Mugu, killing the pilot. Investigations by the FAA and NTSB are currently underway.[11][12][13]
22 August 2017 
Hawker Hunter crashed about 100 miles off the coast of San Diego. The pilot was able to eject and was recovered by a helicopter aboard the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ BusinessWeek. "Airborne Tactical Advantage Company Wins Up to $47,080,902 Contract". Bloomberg L.P. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
  2. ^ ATAC Hawker Hunter F Mk.58 N322AX @ NAF Atsugi Retrieved February 18, 2017
  3. ^ Naval Air Facility 27th of April 2013 Retrieved February 18, 2017
  4. ^ a b Giangreco, Leigh (19 September 2017). "Textron unit acquires 63 Mirage F1s". FlightGlobal. Archived from the original on 2017-09-22. Retrieved 22 September 2017.
  5. ^ Federal Aviation Administration. "US Civil Aircraft Registry, Query="ATAC"". Federal Aviation Administration. Retrieved 20 January 2015.
  6. ^ Arnaud (18 July 2017). "L'enterprise américaine ATAC racchète 63 Mirage F1 Français !". Avions Legendaires (in French). Archived from the original on 2017-09-22. Retrieved 22 September 2017.
  7. ^ "WPR10LA339". National Transportation Safety Board. Retrieved 20 January 2015.
  8. ^ "DCA12PA049". National Transportation Safety Board. Retrieved 20 January 2015.
  9. ^ "DCA12PA076". National Transportation Safety Board. Retrieved 20 January 2015.
  10. ^ "Jet crashes in Southern California, killing pilot". CBS News. Retrieved 18 August 2012.
  11. ^ "WPR15GA030". National Transportation Safety Board. Retrieved 20 January 2015.
  12. ^ "'Top Gun' style military jet crashes outside Navy base in California, killing pilot". NYDailyNews. Retrieved 20 January 2015.
  13. ^ "PILOT DIES IN MILITARY PLANE CRASH IN PORT HUENEME". ABC News. Retrieved 20 January 2015.
  14. ^ "ATAC HAWKER HUNTER CRASHES OFF THE COAST OF SAN DIEGO". The Aviation Geek Club. Retrieved 10 July 2018.

External links[edit]