Airplay

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A radio DJ playing music

In radio broadcasting, airplay is how frequently a song is being played on radio stations. A song which is being played several times every day (spins) would have a significant amount of airplay.[1][2] Music which became very popular on jukeboxes, in nightclubs and at discotheques between the 1940s and 1960s would also have airplay.

Background[edit]

For commercial broadcasting, airplay is usually the result of being placed into rotation, also called adding it to the station's playlist by the music director, possibly as the result of a Pay for Play sponsored by the record label.[3][4] For student radio and other community radio or indie radio stations, it is often the selection by each disc jockey, usually at the suggestion of a music director.

Geography[edit]

Most countries have at least one radio airplay chart in existence, although larger countries such as Canada, the United States,[5] the United Kingdom, Germany, Australia,[1] Japan, and Brazil have several, to cover different genres and areas of the country.[6][7][8]

A song which was successful in the airplay charts but weak in sales was commonly known as a "turntable hit" when radio stations played only vinyl singles.[9] Airplay can be a crucial element in securing a singer's 'hit', and alongside social networking websites it is an effective method that artists use to make their name known.[5][10]

Aaliyah's "Try Again" (2000) was the first song ever to reach number one on the Billboard Hot 100 based solely on the strength of its radio airplay.[11]

Radio airplay is monitored through audio fingerprinting technology with the help of automatic content recognition service. World recognizable music airplay service providers are Radiomonitor, ACRCloud, BMAT, and Soundcharts.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Aussie acts buck airplay snub". news.com.au. April 21, 2008. Retrieved February 26, 2010.
  2. ^ Sharbutt, Jay (December 10, 1977). "Sunday's Billboard music awards: Records sales, airplay the key". Eugene Register-Guard. Associated Press. p. TV9. Retrieved February 26, 2010.
  3. ^ Abbott, Jim (December 19, 1998). "Radio deal puts spin on airplay". Orlando Sentinel. p. C1. Retrieved February 26, 2010.
  4. ^ Leeds, Jeff (December 27, 2001). "Middlemen Put Price on Airplay". Los Angeles Times. p. C1. Retrieved February 26, 2010.
  5. ^ a b DeKnock, Jan (August 6, 1986). "Billboard's numbers game can make or break a record". Chicago Tribune. p. 3. Retrieved February 26, 2010.
  6. ^ "Sales and airplay decide what counts as a hit". USA Today. October 24, 1994. p. 4D. Retrieved February 26, 2010.
  7. ^ Barnes, Ken (January 3, 2002). "Country rules on the radio; There's not a Britney in this airplay bunch". USA Today. p. D1. Retrieved February 26, 2010.
  8. ^ Trevett, Claire (March 15, 2006). "New Zealand music achieves record level of local airplay". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved February 26, 2010.
  9. ^ Posniak, Alan (October 2, 1968). "Badger Beat: Wisconsin Bands and Combos". The Milwaukee Journal. Retrieved February 26, 2010. Consequently, what we ended up with was a turntable hit (so called because it received lots of play on disk jockeys' record turntables).
  10. ^ DeKnock, Jan (July 17, 1992). "The case of the airplay-poor hits". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved February 26, 2010.
  11. ^ Ramirez, Erika (August 25, 2011). "Aaliyah's Top 10 Billboard Hits". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved August 25, 2011.

External links[edit]