Ajuran (clan)

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Ajuran (Ajuuraan) أجران
Languages
Somali
Religion
Islam (Sunni)
Related ethnic groups
Dir, Hawiye and other Samaale groups.

The Ajuran (Arabic: أجران), a is a Somali clan[1] famously known for the Ajuran Sultanate. Group members largely inhabit Kenya, but also Ethiopia and with a considerable numbers also found in Somalia.[2]

Overview[edit]

The Ajuran is a Somali clan famously known for the Ajuran Sultante, a Somali Muslim sultanate that ruled over large parts of the Horn of Africa in the Middle Ages.[3][4][5] Today they largely live in Kenya, the North Eastern Province and the Somali region of Ethiopia, but also in Somalia.

The Ajuraan largely speak the Somali language, but a big portion also speak the Boran language.[6]

The Ajuran are descendants of Alama who in turn is a son of Bal'ad who traces descent from Harmalle Samaale through multiple ancestors.

History[edit]

The Ajuran clan is known for establishing the Ajuran Sultanate.

For more about the history of the Ajuran Sultanate visit the following:

Clan Tree[edit]

This Clan Tree is based on "Identities on the Move: Clanship and Pastoralism in Northern Kenya" by Gunther Schlee[7]

-Samaale

  • Harmalle
    • Bal'ad
      • Alama
        • Ajuran
          • Waaqle
          • Wallemugge
          • Saremugge
          • Tore
          • Dakhsore
          • Beidan
          • Badbeidan
          • Sanle

Prominent Figures[edit]

Olol Dinle

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mohamed Haji Mukhtar (25 February 2003). Historical Dictionary of Somalia. Scarecrow Press. p. 35. ISBN 978-0-8108-6604-1. 
  2. ^ Kenya National Assembly Official Record (Hansard). 1984-03-20. 
  3. ^ Luling, Virginia (2002). Somali Sultanate: the Geledi city-state over 150 years. Transaction Publishers. p. 17. ISBN 978-1-874209-98-0. 
  4. ^ Luc Cambrézy, Populations réfugiées: de l'exil au retour, p.316
  5. ^ Mukhtar, Mohamed Haji. "The Emergence and Role of Political Parties in the Inter-River Region of Somalia from 1947–1960". Ufahamu. 17 (2): 98. 
  6. ^ Schlee, Günther; Watson, Elizabeth E. (2009-01-01). Changing Identifications and Alliances in North-East Africa. Berghahn Books. ISBN 9781845456030. 
  7. ^ Schlee, Günther; Watson, Elizabeth E. (2009-01-01). Changing Identifications and Alliances in North-East Africa. Berghahn Books. ISBN 9781845456030.