Akkermansia

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Akkermansia
Scientific classification
Domain: Bacteria
Phylum: Verrucomicrobia
Class: Verrucomicrobiae
Order: Verrucomicrobiales
Family: Verrucomicrobiaceae
Genus: Akkermansia
Type species
A. muciniphila
Species

A. glycaniphila[1]
A. muciniphila[1]

Akkermansia is a genus in the phylum Verrucomicrobia (Bacteria).[2] The genus was first proposed in 2004 by Muriel Derrien and others, with the type species Akkermansia muciniphila (gen. nov., sp. nov).[3]

Etymology[edit]

The name Akkermansia derives from:
New Latin feminine gender noun Akkermansia, named after Antoon DL Akkermans (28 October 1940 – 21 August 2006),[4] a Dutch microbiologist recognized for his contribution to microbial ecology.[5]

Species[edit]

The genus contains a single known species,[5] namely A. muciniphila ( Derrien et al. 2004, (Type species of the genus).; New Latin neuter gender noun mucinum, mucin; New Latin adjective philus from Greek adjective philos (φίλος) meaning friend, loving; New Latin feminine gender adjective muciniphila, mucin-loving.)[6]

Description of Akkermansia gen. nov.[edit]

Akkermansia (Ak.ker.man'si.a. N.L. fem. n. Akkermansia derived from Antoon Akkermans, a Dutch microbiologist recognized for his contribution to microbial ecology). Cells are oval-shaped, non-motile and stain Gram-negative. Strictly anaerobic. Chemo-organotrophic. Mucolytic in pure culture.[3]:1474

Human metabolism[edit]

Akkermansia muciniphila, the only currently known species within genus Akkermansia, can reside in the human intestinal tract and is currently being studied for its effects on human metabolism. Recently performed studies in rodents have indicated that Akkermansia muciniphila in the intestinal tract may reduce obesity, diabetes, and inflammation. Increases in Akkermansia muciniphila have been associated with multiple sclerosis. https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms12015 [7][8][9] Findings from an internationally collaborative human twin study reported in February 2016 indicate that a decrease in Akkermansia muciniphila c is associated with the increased risk of type 2 diabetes and obesity.[10]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Parte, A.C. "Akkermansia". www.bacterio.net. 
  2. ^ Classification of Genera AC entry in LPSN [Euzéby, J.P. (1997). "List of Bacterial Names with Standing in Nomenclature: a folder available on the Internet". Int J Syst Bacteriol. 47 (2): 590–2. doi:10.1099/00207713-47-2-590. ISSN 0020-7713. PMID 9103655. ]
  3. ^ a b Derrien M, Vaughan EE, Plugge CM, de Vos WM (September 2004). "Akkermansia muciniphila gen. nov., sp. nov., a human intestinal mucin-degrading bacterium". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 54 (Pt 5): 1469–76. doi:10.1099/ijs.0.02873-0. PMID 15388697. 
  4. ^ In memory of Antonius Dirk Louis (Anton) Akkermans, Springer Reference, retrieved 30 April 2014 
  5. ^ a b Akkermansia entry in LPSN [Euzéby, J.P. (1997). "List of Bacterial Names with Standing in Nomenclature: a folder available on the Internet". Int J Syst Bacteriol. 47 (2): 590–2. doi:10.1099/00207713-47-2-590. ISSN 0020-7713. PMID 9103655. ]
  6. ^ Akkermansia muciniphila gen. nov., sp. nov., a human intestinal mucin-degrading bacterium
  7. ^ Everard A, Belzer C, Geurts L, Ouwerkerk JP, Druart C, Bindels LB, Guiot Y, Derrien M, Muccioli GG, Delzenne NM, de Vos WM, Cani PD (May 2013). "Cross-talk between Akkermansia muciniphila and intestinal epithelium controls diet-induced obesity". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 110 (22): 9066–71. doi:10.1073/pnas.1219451110. PMC 3670398Freely accessible. PMID 23671105. 
  8. ^ Wageningen University and Research Centre (2013, May 15). Intestinal bacterium Akkermansia curbs obesity. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August
  9. ^ Caesar R, Tremaroli V, Kovatcheva-Datchary P, Cani PD, Bäckhed F (October 2015). "Crosstalk between Gut Microbiota and Dietary Lipids Aggravates WAT Inflammation through TLR Signaling". Cell Metabolism. 22 (4): 658–68. doi:10.1016/j.cmet.2015.07.026. PMC 4598654Freely accessible. PMID 26321659. Mice that received microbiota from a lard-fed donor showed increased adiposity and inflammation, together with a significant increase in Lactobacillus, compared to mice that received microbiota from a fish-oil-fed donor. Therefore, these data do not provide evidence for a role of Lactobacillus in reducing inflammation. However, we found that the enrichment of Akkermansia co-occurred with partial protection against adiposity and inflammation in mice transplanted with fish-oil microbiota and fed a lard diet, highlighting Akkermansia as a potential mediator of the improved inflammatory and metabolic phenotype of mice fed fish oil. 
  10. ^ Yassour M, Lim MY, Yun HS, Tickle TL, Sung J, Song YM, Lee K, Franzosa EA, Morgan XC, Gevers D, Lander ES, Xavier RJ, Birren BW, Ko G, Huttenhower C (February 2016). "Sub-clinical detection of gut microbial biomarkers of obesity and type 2 diabetes". Genome Medicine. 8 (1): 17. doi:10.1186/s13073-016-0271-6. PMC 4756455Freely accessible. PMID 26884067.