Al-Butaymat

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Al-Butaymat
Al-Butaymat is located in Mandatory Palestine
Al-Butaymat
Al-Butaymat
Arabicالبطيمات
Name meaning"the place with the terebinths."[1]
Also spelledButeimat, al-Buteimat
SubdistrictHaifa
Coordinates32°33′12″N 35°5′38″E / 32.55333°N 35.09389°E / 32.55333; 35.09389Coordinates: 32°33′12″N 35°5′38″E / 32.55333°N 35.09389°E / 32.55333; 35.09389
Palestine grid159/217
Population110[2][3] (1945)
Date of depopulationMay 1948[4]
Cause(s) of depopulationFear of being caught up in the fighting
Current localitiesGal'ed[5] Former: Regavim[6]

Al-Butaymat (Arabic: البطيمات‎, El Buteimât) was a Palestinian Arab village the Haifa Subdistrict, located 31 kilometers (19 mi) southeast of Haifa. It was depopulated during the 1947–48 Civil War in Mandatory Palestine on May 1, 1948, under the Battle of Mishmar HaEmek.

History[edit]

In 1882, the Palestine Exploration Fund's Survey of Western Palestine (SWP) found "traces of ruins" here.[7]

A Haifa man, named Mustafa al-Khalil acquired land in among other places, Al-Butaymat, in the late Ottoman era.[8]

British Mandate era[edit]

In the 1922 census of Palestine conducted by the British Mandate authorities, ‘’Al Buteimat’’ had a population 137, all Muslims,[9] decreasing in the 1931 census to 112 Muslims, in a total of 29 houses.[10]

In the 1945 statistics the village had a population of 110 Muslims,[2] and they had 3,832 dunams of land according to an official land and population survey.[3] Of this, 8 dunams were for plantations and irrigable land, 2,508 for cereals,[11] while 4 dunams were built-up (urban) land.[12]

In 1945 the kibbutz of Gal'ed was established on what was traditionally village land.[5]

1948 and aftermath[edit]

Benny Morris gives May 1948 as depopulation date, and "Fear of being caught up in the fighting" as the cause, but with a question mark.[4][13][14][15][16]

In 1992 the village site was described: "The site is fenced in, overgrown with grass and cactuses. There are no traces of houses except for adobe bricks scattered around the site. Most of the surrounding lands are used as grazing areas, but some of them are cultivated."[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Palmer, 1881, p. 154
  2. ^ a b Department of Statistics, 1945, p. 13
  3. ^ a b Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 47
  4. ^ a b Morris, 2004, p. xviii village #156. Also gives cause of depopulation, but cause indicated in brackets by a question mark.
  5. ^ a b c Khalidi, 1992, p. 157
  6. ^ Morris, 2004, p. xx, settlement #15, July, 1948. Moved to the land of Qannir in 1949.
  7. ^ Conder and Kitchener, 1882, SWP II, p. 71
  8. ^ Yazbak, 1998, p. 142
  9. ^ Barron, 1923, Table xi, Sub-district of Haifa, p. 34
  10. ^ Mills, 1932, p. 89
  11. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 89
  12. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 139
  13. ^ Morris, 2004, p. 132
  14. ^ Morris, 2004, p. 314
  15. ^ Morris, 2004, p. 350
  16. ^ Morris, 2004, p. 406

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]