Al-Dalhamiyya

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Al-Dalhamiyya
Al-Dalhamiyya is located in Mandatory Palestine
Al-Dalhamiyya
Al-Dalhamiyya
Arabic الدلهمية
Name meaning from a family name[1]
Subdistrict Tiberias
Coordinates 32°39′38″N 35°35′52″E / 32.66056°N 35.59778°E / 32.66056; 35.59778Coordinates: 32°39′38″N 35°35′52″E / 32.66056°N 35.59778°E / 32.66056; 35.59778
Palestine grid 204/230
Population 410[2][3] (1945)
Area 2,852 dunams
Date of depopulation April 15, 1948

Al-Dalhamiyya (Arabic: الدلهمية‎) was a Palestinian Arab village in the Tiberias Subdistrict. It was depopulated during the 1947–1948 Civil War in Mandatory Palestine on April 15, 1948, under Operation Gideon. It was located 14 km south of Tiberias, on the north bank of the Yarmuk River, on the border between Mandatory Palestine and Transjordan.

History[edit]

Ottoman era[edit]

In 1838 Al-Dalhamiyya was pointed out to Edward Robinson during his travels in the area, as being located on the eastern bank, about half a mile above the mouth of the Yarmuk.[4]

In 1875 Victor Guérin noted that the houses of the village were built of adobe, and most were surmounted by reed huts.[5] The same year C. R. Conder called it a "miserable" adobe hamlet.[6][7] A population list from about 1887 showed ed Delhamiyeh wa ’Arab el Hanady to have about 650 inhabitants; all Muslims.[8]

Menachemya was founded by Zionist in 1902, close to the village, but not on village land.[9]

British Mandate era[edit]

At the time of the 1922 census of Palestine conducted by the British Mandate authorities, Delhamiyeh had a population of 352; 349 Muslims and 3 Jews,[10] decreasing to 240; 226 Muslims, 1 Jew and 13 Christians, living in 50 houses by the 1931 census.[11]

Ashdot Ya'aqov, southwest to the village site, and Ashdot Ya'aqov Me'uchad, west of the village site, were settled by Zionist in 1933, but none on village land.[9]

In the 1944/1945 statistics, the village had a population of 410; 390 Muslims and 20 Christians,[2] with a total of 2,852 dunams of land.[3] Of this, Arabs used 29 dunams for plantations and irrigable land, 1,709 dunams were used for cereals,[12] while a total of 442 dunams were un-cultivable.[13]

1948, aftermath[edit]

In 1992 the village site was described: "The village has been obliterated. There is a banana grove on the site that belongs to the nearby kibbutz, Ashdod Ya'aqov."[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Palmer, 1881, p. 160
  2. ^ a b Department of Statistics, 1945, p. 12
  3. ^ a b Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 72
  4. ^ Robinson and Smith, 1841, vol. 3, p. 264
  5. ^ Guérin, 1880, p. 284
  6. ^ Conder, 1875, p. 74
  7. ^ Conder and Kitchener, 1882, SWP II, p. 90
  8. ^ Schumacher, 1888, p. 186
  9. ^ a b c Khalidi, 1992, p. 516
  10. ^ Barron, 1923, Table XI, p. 39
  11. ^ Mills, 1932, p.83
  12. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 122
  13. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 172

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]