Al-Haditha, Ramle

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Al-Haditha
Al-Haditha is located in Mandatory Palestine
Al-Haditha
Al-Haditha
Arabic الحديثة
Name meaning "new"[1]
Subdistrict Ramle
Coordinates 31°57′48″N 34°57′07″E / 31.96333°N 34.95194°E / 31.96333; 34.95194Coordinates: 31°57′48″N 34°57′07″E / 31.96333°N 34.95194°E / 31.96333; 34.95194
Palestine grid 145/152
Population 760[2][3] (1945)
Date of depopulation July 12, 1948[4]
Cause(s) of depopulation Military assault by Yishuv forces
Current localities Hadid[5][6]

Al-Haditha was a Palestinian village in the Ramle Subdistrict. It was located 8 km northeast of Ramla, on the bank of Wadi al-Natuf. The site, now known as Tel Hadid, has yielded significant archaeological remains from many periods. Al-Haditha was depopulated during the 1948 Arab-Israeli War on July 12, 1948, under the first stage of Operation Dani.

History[edit]

It has been suggested that Al-Haditha was the site of the biblical village of Hadid, mentioned in the Book of Ezra (II, 33) and later in the Mishna as a city of Judea fortified by Joshua.[7] Hadid was called 'Adida in the Book of Maccabees, while Eusebius referred to it as Adatha or Aditha.[7]

Ottoman era[edit]

In 1870, Victor Guérin visited and "at a quarter of an hour's distance south-east of Haditheh, [he] found several ancient tombs cut in the rock. The village of Haditheh he found to be on the site of an ancient town. Cisterns, a birket, tombs, and rock-cut caves, with cut stones scattered about, are all that remain."[8]

An official Ottoman village list of about 1870 showed that "El Hadite" had 28 houses and a population of 145, though the population count included only men.[9][10]

In 1882 the Palestine Exploration Fund's Survey of Western Palestine (SWP) described the village as "a moderate-sized village on a terraced Tell at the mouth of a valley at the foot of the hills, with a well on the east. There are remains of a considerable town round it, tombs and quarries exist ; and the mound on which the village stands is covered with pottery."[11]

British Mandate era[edit]

In a census conducted in 1922 by the British Mandate authorities, Hadata had a population of 415 inhabitants; all Muslims,[12] increasing in the 1931 census to 520, still all Muslims, in a total of 119 houses.[13]

In 1945, the village had a population of 760 Muslims,[2] with a total of 7,110 dunums of land.[3] A total of 10 dunams of village land were used for citrus and bananas, 4,419 dunums were used for cereals, 246 dunums were irrigated or used for plantations,[14] while 16 dunams were built–up, or urban, land.[15]

1948, aftermath[edit]

Early in 1948, the Mukhtar of Al-Haditha met to negotiate a non–belligerent agreement with the neighbouring Ben Shemen.[16] However, Al-Haditha was depopulated during the 1948 Arab-Israeli War on July 12, 1948, under the first stage of Operation Dani.[4]

In September, 1948, Ben-Gurion asked the ministerial committee for permission to destroy 14 villages, one of which was Al-Haditha.[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Palmer, 1881, p. 229
  2. ^ a b Department of Statistics, 1945, p. 29
  3. ^ a b Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 66
  4. ^ a b Morris, 2004, p. xix, village #224. Also gives cause of depopulation.
  5. ^ Morris, 2004, p. xxi, settlement #88. Also gives cause of depopulation.
  6. ^ Khalidi, 1991, p. 381
  7. ^ a b Neubauer, 1868, pp. 85-86
  8. ^ Guérin, 1875, pp. 64 -67, as given in Conder and Kitchener, 1882, SWP II, p. 322
  9. ^ Socin, 1879, p. 154
  10. ^ Hartmann, 1883, p. 140, noted 26 houses
  11. ^ Conder and Kitchener, 1882, SWP II, p. 297
  12. ^ Barron, 1923, Table VII, Sub-district of Ramleh, p. 22
  13. ^ Mills, 1932, p. 20.
  14. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 115
  15. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 165
  16. ^ Morris, 2004, p. 92
  17. ^ Morris, 2004, p. 354

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]