Al-Malkiyya

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Al-Malikiyya
Al-Malikiyya is located in Mandatory Palestine
Al-Malikiyya
Al-Malikiyya
Arabic المالكية
Name meaning from "Malek": to possess, or reign[1]
Also spelled Malikiya, al
Subdistrict Safad
Coordinates 33°06′19.81″N 35°30′22.67″E / 33.1055028°N 35.5062972°E / 33.1055028; 35.5062972Coordinates: 33°06′19.81″N 35°30′22.67″E / 33.1055028°N 35.5062972°E / 33.1055028; 35.5062972
Palestine grid 197/278
Population 360[2] (1945)
Area 7,328[2] dunams
Date of depopulation 28 May 1948[3]
Cause(s) of depopulation Military assault by Yishuv forces
Current localities Malkiya[4][5]

Al-Malikiyya (Arabic: المالكية‎) was a Palestinian village located in the Jabal Amil region. In a 1920s census, the village was registered as part of Greater Lebanon. It was later placed under the British Mandate of Palestine. Its population was mostly Metawali Shiite.

In a 1930s census, the village was registered as Palestinian and part of the Safed District. The village was depopulated as a result of the 1948 Arab-Israeli War.

History[edit]

According to the Arab geographer Yaqut al-Hamawi (d. 1228), the people of al-Malikiyya had a wooden platter that they believed was originally owned by the prophet Mohammed.[5][6]

Ottoman era[edit]

In 1596, al-Malikiyya was a village in the Ottoman nahiya (subdistrict) of Tibnin under the liwa' (district) of Safad, with a population of 369. It paid taxes on a number of crops, such as wheat, barley, as well as goats and beehives.[7][8]

Victor Guérin visited in 1875, and noted that Al-Malkiyya had 300 Metawali inhabitants.[9] He further noted that the village, which stood upon a lofty summit, was remarkable for possessing neither well nor cistern; the women fetched their water from the spring at Kades. But a birkeh was placed on the map close to the village.[10]

In 1881, the Palestine Exploration Fund's Survey of Western Palestine (SWP) described Al-Malkiyya as being built of stone and adobe, lying on a plain to the east of a valley. Well supplied with water from a nearby wadi, the village's 200-300 inhabitants cultivated olives.[11]

British Mandate era[edit]

In the 1931 census of Palestine, conducted by the British Mandate authorities, El Malikiya had a population of 254, all Muslims, in 48 houses.[12]

The population was 360 in 1945, with a total of 7,328 dunams of land.[2] A total of 4,225 dunums were allocated to cereals,[13] while 55 dunams were classifies as built-up land.[14]

1948 Arab-Israeli war, aftermath[edit]

Al-Malikiyya changed hands no fewer than five times between May and October 1948.[5]

A battle was fought in the village on 5-6 June 1948. Combatants were Israelis and the Lebanese army commanded by then Lebanese minister of defense, Emir Majid Arslan II. The Lebanese army would occupy the village for a month. This was the only time Lebanon directly participated in the war. [15]

As a result of the war, the village was depopulated.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Palmer, 1881, p. 88
  2. ^ a b c Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 70
  3. ^ Morris, 2004, p. xvi, village #25. Also gives cause of depopulation.
  4. ^ Morris, 2004, p. xxii, Settlement #135, established 1949.
  5. ^ a b c Khalidi, 1992, p. 471
  6. ^ Mu'jam Al-Buldan, cited in le Strange, 1890, p.77
  7. ^ Hütteroth and Abdulfattah, 1977, p. 179. Quoted in Khalidi, 1992, p. 471
  8. ^ Note that Rhode, 1979, p. 6 writes that the register that Hütteroth and Abdulfattah studied was not from 1595/6, but from 1548/9
  9. ^ Guérin, 1880, p. 373
  10. ^ Guérin, 1880, p. 373, as given in Conder and Kitchener, 1881, SWP I, p. 251
  11. ^ Conder and Kitchener, 1881, SWP I, p. 202; Quoted in Khalidi, 1992, p. 471
  12. ^ Mills, 1932, p. 108
  13. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 119
  14. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 170
  15. ^ Morris, 2004, p. 276

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]