Al-Mansura, Tiberias

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This article is about the former Palestinian village in Tiberias Sub-district. For other uses, see El Mansurah (disambiguation).
Al-Mansura
Arabic المنصورة
Name meaning Building[1]
Subdistrict Tiberias
Palestine grid 189/255
Date of depopulation May 10, 1948

Al-Mansura (Arabic: المنصورة‎‎) was a Palestinian Arab village in the Tiberias Subdistrict. It was depopulated during the 1947–1948 Civil War in Mandatory Palestine on May 10, 1948. It was located 16 kilometres northwest of Tiberias.[2]

History[edit]

Al-Mansura, like the rest of Palestine, was incorporated into the Ottoman Empire in 1517, and in the census of 1596, the village was located in the nahiya of Tabariyya in the liwa of Safad. It had a population of 16 households, all Muslim. They paid a fixed tax-rate of 25% on agricultural products, including wheat, barley, rice, goats and beehives, in addition to occasional revenues; the taxes totalled 530 akçe.[3][4]

In 1875 the French explorer Victor Guérin found the village to have 200 Druse inhabitants.[5] In 1881, the Palestine Exploration Fund's Survey of Western Palestine described El Mansurah as "A stone-built village, situated on the slope of the hill, containing about 150 Moslems; extensive olive-groves to the south; water from springs and cisterns."[6]

British Mandate era[edit]

In the 1922 census of Palestine, conducted by the British Mandate authorities, Mughar wa Mansura had a total population of 1377. Of these, 265 were Muslim, 676 Druze and 436 Christians.[7] All the Christians were Roman Catholic.[8] In the 1931 census the population of Al-Mansura, together with nearby Maghar, was a total of 1733, in 373 inhabited houses. Of these, 307 were Muslim, 549 Christians, and 877 Druze.[9]

In 1945 the population of Al-Mansura, together with nearby Maghar, was 2,140;[10] 90 Muslims, 800 Christians and 1,250 others.[11] They had 55,583 dunams of land according to an official land and population survey.[10] 7,864 dunams were plantations and irrigable land, 18,352 for cereals,[2][12] while 55 dunams were built-up (urban) land.[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Palmer, 1881, pp. 9, 130
  2. ^ a b Khalidi, 1992, p. 533
  3. ^ Hütteroth and Abdulfattah, 1977, p. 190
  4. ^ Note that Rhode, 1979, p. 6 writes that the register that Hütteroth and Abdulfattah studied from the Safad-district was not from 1595/6, but from 1548/9.
  5. ^ Guérin, 1868, p. 458-459, as referred in Conder and Kitchener, 1881, p. 364
  6. ^ Conder and Kitchener, 1881, SWP I, p. 364
  7. ^ Barron, 1923, Table XI, Sub-district of Tiberias, p. 39
  8. ^ Barron, 1923, Table XVI, p. 51
  9. ^ Mills, 1932, p. 83
  10. ^ a b Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 72
  11. ^ Department of Statistics, 1945, p. 12
  12. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 122
  13. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 172

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]