Al-Sanbariyya

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Al-Sanbariyya
Al-Sanbariyya is located in Mandatory Palestine
Al-Sanbariyya
Al-Sanbariyya
Arabic السنبرية
Name meaning

Kh. es Sambarîyeh, the ruin of the

Sambarîyeh[1]
Subdistrict Safad
Coordinates 33°14′05″N 35°37′07″E / 33.23472°N 35.61861°E / 33.23472; 35.61861Coordinates: 33°14′05″N 35°37′07″E / 33.23472°N 35.61861°E / 33.23472; 35.61861
Palestine grid 208/293
Population 130[2] (1945)
Date of depopulation May, 1948[3]
Current localities Ma'yan Barukh[4] and Dafna[4]

Al-Sanbariyya was a Palestinian village in the Safad Subdistrict. It was depopulated during the 1947–1948 Civil War in Mandatory Palestine on May 1, 1948 by Palmach's First Battalion under Operation Yiftach. It was located 31.5 km northeast of Safad, near Wadi Hasibani.

History[edit]

The village contained a notable Roman inscription in a column, referring to the Roman Emperor Julian (331-363 C.E.)[4]

In 1881, the Palestine Exploration Fund's Survey of Western Palestine (SWP) described it as "a few ruined Arab houses."[5]

British Mandate era[edit]

In the 1931 census of Palestine, during the British Mandate for Palestine, the village had a population of 83; 77 Muslims and 6 Christians, in a total of 20 houses.[6]

In 1945, the village had a population of 130 Muslims,[2] with a total land area of 2,532 dunams.[7] Of this, 539 dunams were allocated for plantations and irrigable land, 1,739 for cereals,[8] while 6 dunams were classified as non-cultivable areas.[9]

1948, aftermath[edit]

A complaint to Mapam said that “...I spoke to a number of members from Ma'ayan Baruch and nearby kibbutzim and I got the impression that there exists the possibility that there is a desire to destroy the villages and [the Arabs'] houses so that it will be impossible for the Arabs to return to them. A week ago a representative of the JNF (possibly Yosef Nahmani) came to visit. He saw that in the village of al Sanbariya ...several houses were still standing, albeit without roofs. He told the secretariat of the kibbutz to destroy the houses immediately and he said openly that this will enable us to take the village's lands, because the Arabs won't be able to return there. I am sorry to say the kibbutz agreed immediately without thinking about what they were doing.“[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Palmer, 1881, p. 28
  2. ^ a b Department of Statistics, 1945, p. 11
  3. ^ Morris, 2004, p. xvi, village #4. Causes of depopulation given as "?"
  4. ^ a b c Khalidi, 1992, p. 494
  5. ^ Conder and Kitchener, 1881, SWP I, p. 121
  6. ^ Mills, 1932, p. 110
  7. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 71
  8. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 121
  9. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 171
  10. ^ Morris, 2004, p. 357

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]