Al-Sawalima

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Al-Sawalima
Al-Sawalima is located in Mandatory Palestine
Al-Sawalima
Al-Sawalima
Arabic السوالمة
Name meaning es Sûâlimîyeh, the ruin of the Sâlem family[1]
Subdistrict Jaffa
Coordinates 32°06′59″N 34°50′51″E / 32.11639°N 34.84750°E / 32.11639; 34.84750Coordinates: 32°06′59″N 34°50′51″E / 32.11639°N 34.84750°E / 32.11639; 34.84750
Palestine grid 134/170
Population 800[2][3] (1945)
Date of depopulation March 30, 1948[4]
Cause(s) of depopulation Fear of being caught up in the fighting
Secondary cause Influence of nearby town's fall
Current localities Neve Sharett

Al-Sawalima was a Palestinian Arab village in the Jaffa Subdistrict. It was depopulated during the 1947–1948 Civil War in Mandatory Palestine on March 30, 1948. It was located 11 km northeast of Jaffa, situated 2 km north of the al-'Awja River.

History[edit]

In 1882 the Palestine Exploration Fund's Survey of Western Palestine noted at Khurbet es Sualimiyeh: “Traces of ruins only.“[5]

British Mandate era[edit]

In the 1922 census of Palestine conducted by the British Mandate authorities, Sawalmeh had a population of 70 Muslims,[6] increasing in the 1931 census when Es-Sawalmeh had 429 Muslim inhabitants.[7]

In the 1945 statistics, the village had a population of 800 Muslims,[2] while the total land area was 5,942 dunams, according to an official land and population survey.[3] Of the land area, a total of 894 were used for growing citrus and banana, 191 were for plantations and irrigable land, 4,566 for cereals,[8] while 291 dunams were classified as non-cultivable areas.[9]

Al-Sawalima had an elementary school for boys founded in 1946, with 31 students.[10]

1948 and aftermath[edit]

Benny Morris gives "Fear of being caught up in the fighting" and "Influence of nearby town's fall" as reasons for why the village became depopulated on March 30, 1948.[4]

In 1992 the village site was described: "Cactuses grow on the village site. No identifiable traces of the former dwellings (tents or adobe houses) remain. Only the remnants of the one-room school are discernable. A highway runs past the north side of the site."[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Palmer, 1881, p. 215
  2. ^ a b Department of Statistics, 1945, p. 28
  3. ^ a b Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 53
  4. ^ a b Morris, 2004, p. xviii, village #198. Also gives causes of depopulation
  5. ^ Conder and Kitchener, 1882, SWP II, p. 266
  6. ^ Barron, 1923, Table VII, Sub-district of Jaffa, p. 20
  7. ^ Mills, 1932, p. 17
  8. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 96
  9. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 146
  10. ^ Khalidi, 1992, p. 258
  11. ^ Khalidi, 1992, p. 259

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]