Al-Tina

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Al-Tina

التينة
Village
Etymology: The fig tree[1]
Al-Tina is located in Mandatory Palestine
Al-Tina
Al-Tina
Coordinates: 31°44′48″N 34°49′11″E / 31.74667°N 34.81972°E / 31.74667; 34.81972Coordinates: 31°44′48″N 34°49′11″E / 31.74667°N 34.81972°E / 31.74667; 34.81972
Palestine grid133/128
Geopolitical entityMandatory Palestine
SubdistrictRamle
Date of depopulationJuly 8–9, 1948[4]
Area
 • Total7,001 dunams (7.001 km2 or 2.703 sq mi)
Population
 (1945)
 • Total750[2][3]
Cause(s) of depopulationMilitary assault by Yishuv forces

Al-Tina was a Palestinian Arab village in the Ramle Subdistrict of Mandatory Palestine. It was depopulated during the 1948 Arab–Israeli War on July 8, 1948, by the Givati Brigade under Operation An-Far. It was located 20. km south of Ramla.

History[edit]

Al-Tina was incorporated into the Ottoman Empire in 1517 with all of Palestine, and in 1596 it appeared in the tax registers under the name of Safiriyya, as being in the nahiya ("subdistrict") of Gaza, which was part of Gaza Sanjak. It had a population of 10 household; an estimated 55 persons, who were all Muslims. They paid a fixed tax-rate of 25% on agricultural products, including wheat, barley, summer crops, sesame, fruit trees, goats and beehives, in addition to occasional revenues; a total of 4,350 akçe.[5][6]

In 1838, it was noted as a Muslim village, el Letineh, in the Gaza District.[7] In 1851-52, van de Velde noted many old stone laying about the village.[8]

In 1863 Victor Guérin found a population is four hundred souls. He further noted some antique stones which were scattered in the cemetery or have been placed around the opening of the well.[9]

An Ottoman village list from about 1870 showed that tine had 96 houses and a population of 277, though the population count included men, only.[10][11]

In 1882, the Palestine Exploration Fund's Survey of Western Palestine described it as an ordinary adobe village, with a well to the south.[12]

British Mandate era[edit]

In the 1922 census of Palestine conducted by the British Mandate authorities, Tineh had a population of 396, all Muslims,[13] increasing in the 1931 census to 530, still all Muslims, in a total of 131 houses.[14]

al-Tina was the birthplace of 'Abd al-Fattah Humud (1933-1968), a petroleum engineer, and one of the founding members of Fatah, the largest Palestinian Liberation Organization faction.[6]

In the 1945 statistics the village had a population of 750 Muslims,[2] with 7,001 dunams of land.[3] Of this, 141 dunams were used for citrus and bananas, 5,639 for cereals,[15] while 24 dunams were classified as built-up areas.[16]

An elementary school was founded in 1946 and it had an initial enrollment of 67 students.[6]

1948 and aftermath[edit]

Al-Tina was depopulated during the 1948 Arab–Israeli War on July 8, 1948, by the Givati Brigade under Operation An-Far.[4][17][18][19][20][21][22]

Kefar Menachem is located 3 km southeast of al-Tina, on land with used to being to Idnibba.[6]

In 1992 the village site was described: "The village has been completely effaced. Next to the site is a wide area, overgrown with bushes and thorns, that is fenced in on the southern side. An orange grove is planted on the northern and western edges of the site. A highway that runs east-west passes to the south, and a railway line passes by about 100 meters to the east."[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Palmer, 1881, p. 275
  2. ^ a b Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics, 1945, p. 30
  3. ^ a b c Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 68
  4. ^ a b Morris, 2004, p. xix, village #269. Also gives cause of depopulation.
  5. ^ Hütteroth and Abdulfattah, 1977, p. 143
  6. ^ a b c d e Khalidi, 1992, p. 416
  7. ^ Robinson and Smith, vol.3, Appendix 2, p. 118
  8. ^ van de Velde, 1854, p. 160
  9. ^ Guérin, 1869, p. 88
  10. ^ Socin, 1879, p. 162
  11. ^ Hartmann, 1883, p. 133 also noted 96 houses in el-letine.
  12. ^ Conder and Kitchener, 1882, SWP II, p. 414, cited in Khalidi, 1992, p. 416
  13. ^ Barron, 1923, Table VII, Sub-district of Ramleh, p. 21
  14. ^ Mills, 1932, p. 23.
  15. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 117
  16. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 167
  17. ^ Morris, 2004, p. 224
  18. ^ Morris, 2004, p. 414
  19. ^ Morris, 2004, p. 432
  20. ^ Morris, 2004, p. 436
  21. ^ Morris, 2004, p. 437
  22. ^ Morris, 2004, p. 443

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]