Al Farooq Omar Bin Al Khattab Mosque

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Al Farooq Omar Bin Al Khattab Mosque & Centre
Religion
AffiliationIslam
Location
LocationDubai, U.A.E.
Al Farooq Omar Bin Al Khattab Mosque is located in United Arab Emirates
Al Farooq Omar Bin Al Khattab Mosque
Location in the UAE
Geographic coordinates25°10′16″N 55°13′59″E / 25.171°N 55.233°E / 25.171; 55.233Coordinates: 25°10′16″N 55°13′59″E / 25.171°N 55.233°E / 25.171; 55.233
Architecture
Architectural typeMosque
Completed2011
Specifications
Capacityover 2,000
Dome(s)21 domes
Minaret(s)4
Minaret height60 m (197 ft)
Site area93,400 sq ft (8,680 m2)
Website
www.alfarooqcentre.com

The Al Farooq Omar Bin Al Khattab Mosque (Arabic: مسجد ومركز الفاروق عمر بن الخطاب‎) is a mosque located in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. The mosque is named after Umar bin Al Khattab, a companion of the Prophet Mohammed who became the second Caliph after Abu Bakr and was given the title Al Farooq, meaning someone who distinguished truth from falsehood. The original Al Farooq Omar Bin Al Khattab Mosque was established on the same site in 1986.

The building was renovated twice, in 2003 and later in 2011 by the order of Khalaf Ahmad Al Habtoor, the chairman of the business empire that bears his family name and whose interests stretch from vehicle sales, schools and hotels to engineering and publishing. It was opened to the public on July 29, 2011.[1][2]

The Al Farooq Omar Bin Al Khattab Mosque can accommodate 2,000 worshipers and is considered one of the UAE’s largest mosques and the third of its kind to open its doors to non-Muslims after the Mosque of late Sheikh Zayed Bin Sultan Al Nahyan in Abu Dhabi and the Grand Mosque in Jumeirah.[3]

The Al Farooq Omar Bin Al Khattab Mosque & Centre has welcomed Islamic religious figure Sheikh Ahmad Ali Al Nahas, Muazin of Haram Al Maki.[4]

Design[edit]

The inscriptions in the mosque are Ottoman inscriptions inspired by the Blue Mosque in Istanbul and had an Andalusian touch. Andalusian art is an Islamic school, dating back to the year 711 when the Moors first landed in the South of Spain. Its influence is obvious throughout both the exterior and the interior – from the colourful tiles in the front entrance, which surround a traditional-style fountain, to the shapes used in the interior design. These inscriptions were sculpted by hand by 60 Moroccan craftsmen from the city of Fez, the stronghold of this authentic Andalusian heritage.

The interior of the mosque has many features. The carpets were specially manufactured in Germany; a new method of air conditioning was adopted. The main dome rises to approximately 30 metres in height. There are also 15 smaller domes with four additional half domes surrounding the main one.

Al Farooq Mosque[edit]

  • Total area of 93,400 square feet
  • Area of the mosque complex spans 8,700 metres. The mosque itself is 4,200 square metres [5]
  • Capable of accommodating 2,000 worshipers
  • Library holds a collection of 4000 Islamic and other religious titles
  • Youth club
  • Lecture Hall
  • Classroom
  • Administration
  • Housing for Imam and Mu’azin

Architecture[edit]

The external architecture is based on the Sultan Ahmed Mosque in Istanbul, known as the Blue Mosque for the thousands of Iznek tiles that colour its interior walls and arches.

  • 21 domes and 124 stained glass windows
  • Four pencil-shaped minarets rise high, measuring 65 meters each
  • 60 expert artists and craftsmen from Morocco decorated the interior
  • Red and gold colored carpet was commissioned in Germany
  • The mosque was modeled using plaster of Paris and fusaifisa tiles, originating from Fez, Morocco

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Beautiful Mosque Pictures". Beautifulmosque.com. Retrieved 2016-11-14.
  2. ^ "The Al Farooq Omar Ibn Al Khattab Mosque and Centre opens in Dubai by Erin Mc Cafferty". Alshindagah.com. Retrieved 2016-11-14.
  3. ^ "Dubai's Largest Mosque Gets Ramadan Opening - Entertainment Features, In The UAE". Ahlanlive. 2011-07-19. Retrieved 2016-11-14.
  4. ^ [1][dead link]
  5. ^ Mallari, Dennis B (2014-02-21). "Mosque moments: Al Farooq Mosque and Islamic Centre". Fridaymagazine.ae. Retrieved 2016-11-14.

External links[edit]