Al Mustakillah (TV channel)

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Al Mustakillah
Launched1999 (1999)
Owned byMohamed Hechmi Hamdi
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageArabic
Websitewww.almustakillah.com
Availability
Satellite
Eutelsat 7WA10921 V 27500 3/4
Arabsat10924 V 27500 5/6

Al Mustakillah (Arabic: المستقلة‎; or The Independent) is an Arabic language television channel based in London, United Kingdom, aimed towards a Tunisian audience. Founded in 1999 by Mohamed Hechmi Hamdi, it remains owned by his Almustakillah TV Ltd.[1][2]

During the Ben Ali era, the channel and especially its show The Great Maghreb was an important forum for opposition voices, including Tunisian activist Rachid Ghannouchi,[3] and Sihem Bensedrine, journalist and editor of Kalima online magazine, spokesperson for CNLT (National Committee for Freedoms in Tunisia) and former vice-president of LTDH (Tunisian Human Rights League).[4]

Al-Mustakillah’s founder Hechmi Hamdi was alleged to be politically allied with Bin Ali, yet he often interviewed leaders of the Tunisian opposition on his satellite programs. He helped them speak their opinions on 'The Great Maghreb,' widely viewed in Tunisia. In reaction, Bin Ali's Tunisian regime called Hamdi "a traitor and a spy."[5] The government began cracking down on political opposition, and Hamdi fled Tunisia to settle in London.[6][7]

Much of Al-Mustakillah’s programming deals with human rights, democracy and freedom of expression. Among its most popular programs is 'Shedding a Light on the Culture of Human Rights,' hosted by Abdul Hussein Shaban, president of the Arab Human Rights Organisation, U.K. [8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Newspaper, Muscat Daily. "London-based Tunisian under fire after election success,London". Muscat Daily News. Retrieved 2017-03-22.
  2. ^ Hababou, Moez; Amrouche, Nawel (2013-10-01). "Misconceptions and Realities of the 2011 Tunisian Election". PS: Political Science & Politics. 46 (4): 741–747.
  3. ^ "Neighbours from hell: how Syria's war hit an Acton street". The Independent. 2012-03-19. Retrieved 2017-03-22.
  4. ^ "Tunisian, Egyptian nominated for Sakharov Prize". www.panapress.com. Retrieved 2017-03-22.
  5. ^ "UNDERSTANDING THE "ISLAMIST WAVE" IN TUNISIA". www.rubincenter.org. Retrieved 2017-03-22.
  6. ^ Newspaper, Muscat Daily. "London-based Tunisian under fire after election success,London". Muscat Daily News. Retrieved 2017-03-22.
  7. ^ "Democracy in the Making - Majalla Magazine". Majalla Magazine. 2014-02-26. Retrieved 2017-03-22.
  8. ^ Sardar, Ziauddin (2008). Breaking the Monolith (PDF). ImprintOne. p. 151. ISBN 9788188861057.

External links[edit]