Alabama Crimson Tide softball

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Alabama Crimson Tide
2016 Alabama Crimson Tide softball team
CrimsonTideAlogo.png
University University of Alabama
Conference SEC
Western Division
Location Tuscaloosa, AL
Head coach Patrick Murphy (17th year)
Home stadium Rhoads Stadium (Capacity: 3,940)
Nickname Crimson Tide
Colors Crimson and White[1]
         
National Championships
2012
WCWS Appearances
2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016
NCAA Tournament Appearances
1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016
Conference Tournament Champions
1998, 2003, 2005, 2010, 2012
Conference Champions
2006, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014

The Alabama Crimson Tide softball team represents the University of Alabama in NCAA Division I college softball. The team participates in the Western Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). It is currently led by head coach Patrick Murphy and assistant coaches Alyson Habetz and Stephanie VanBrakle. The team plays its home games at the Rhoads Stadium located on the university's campus. The Alabama Crimson Tide softball team won its first National Championship in 2012, after they defeated the Oklahoma Sooners in the championship series of the Women's College World Series.

History[edit]

On September 28, 1995, Alabama athletics director Glen Tuckett announced the school would sponsor a softball program to begin play in the 1997 season.[2] At the time of its addition, softball became both the 20th varsity sport overall and 11th women's sport sponsored at Alabama.[2] On January 3, 1996, Kalum Haack was hired from Kansas to serve as the first head coach for the team.[3] The next spring, Haack recruited his first class for the inaugural 1997 team.[3] On February 15, 1997, Alabama defeated Tulsa 5–2 in their first all-time game at ASA Hall of Fame Stadium in Oklahoma City.[4] Two weeks later, the Crimson Tide won their first all-time home game in their home opener at Sokol Park against Delta State 4–3.[5]

After he led the Crimson Tide in their inaugural season and to their first SEC championship in their second season, on June 30, 1998, Haack resigned as head coach.[6] He cited personal reasons for his resignation.[6] During his two year stint as head coach, Haack compiled an overall record of 78 wins and 47 losses (78–47).[6] A week later on July 9, Alabama assistant coach Patrick Murphy was promoted to the Crimson Tide's head coach position.[7]

Since Murphy took over in 1999, the Crimson Tide has won 10 SEC championships (5 regular season and 5 tournaments), made 17 consecutive NCAA tournaments (every year since 1999) and have advanced to the Women's College World Series ten times.[8][9] In 2012, Alabama defeated the Oklahoma Sooners, 2 games to 1, in the championship series of the Women's College World Series, to win its first national championship in school history and the first softball national championship in the history of the SEC.[10]

Head coaches[edit]

Name Years Record
Kalum Haack 1997–1998 78–47 (35–21 SEC)
Patrick Murphy 1999–present 789–214 (323–102 SEC)

Alabama's Louisville Slugger/NFCA All-Americans[edit]

Player Year(s)
Kelly Kretschman 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001
Carrie Moreman 1999
Ginger Jones 2000
Shelley Laird 2000, 2001
Suzanne Olcott 2001
Ashley Courtney 2002, 2005
Jackie McClain 2002, 2003, 2004
Stephanie VanBrakle 2005, 2006
Brittany Rogers 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009
Lauren Parker 2007
Chrissy Owens 2007
Kelley Montalvo 2008
Charlotte Morgan 2008, 2009, 2010
Kelsi Dunne 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011
Kayla Braud 2010, 2011, 2013
Whitney Larsen 2011
Jackie Traina 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Kaila Hunt 2012, 2013
Amanda Locke 2012
Jennifer Fenton 2012
Haylie McCleney 2013, 2014, 2015
Alexis Osorio 2015
Marisa Runyon 2015
Demi Turner 2015
Reference:[11]

Denotes 1st Team selection

Year-by-year records[edit]

Season Coach Record Notes Home Attendance
1997 Kalum Haack 29–29 (16–14 SEC) 3,750 250/game
1998 Kalum Haack 49–18 (19–7 SEC) SEC Tournament Champions 8,552 275/game
1999 Patrick Murphy 39–26 (19–11 SEC) NCAA Regionals 9,306 404/game
2000 Patrick Murphy 66–14 (25–5 SEC) NCAA Regionals, Women's College World Series 9,958 398/game
2001 Patrick Murphy 50–11 (24–6 SEC) NCAA Regionals 17,763 612/game
2002 Patrick Murphy 46–21 (22–8 SEC) NCAA Regionals 21,224 707/game
2003 Patrick Murphy 49–21 (22–8 SEC) SEC Tournament Champions, NCAA Regionals, Women's College World Series 14,094 587/game
2004 Patrick Murphy 45–20 (18–12 SEC) NCAA Regionals 12,655 666/game
2005 Patrick Murphy 63–15 (23–7 SEC) SEC Tournament Champions, NCAA Regionals, NCAA Super Regionals, Women's College World Series 21,766 906/game
2006 Patrick Murphy 54–11 (25–4 SEC) SEC Champion, NCAA Regionals, NCAA Super Regionals, Women's College World Series 26,210 1,048/game
2007 Patrick Murphy 55–10 (21–6 SEC) NCAA Regionals, NCAA Super Regionals 42,431 1,146/game
2008 Patrick Murphy 58–8 (25–3 SEC) NCAA Regionals, NCAA Super Regionals, Women's College World Series 59,909 1,932/game
2009 Patrick Murphy 54–11 (21–6 SEC) NCAA Regionals, NCAA Super Regionals, Women's College World Series 70,699 2,209/game
2010 Patrick Murphy 52–11 (23–4 SEC) SEC Regular Season Champion, SEC Tournament Champions, NCAA Regionals, NCAA Super Regionals 80,690 2,373/game
2011 Patrick Murphy 51–9 (19–6 SEC) SEC Regular Season Champion, NCAA Regionals, NCAA Super Regionals, Women's College World Series 68,119 2,619/game
2012 Patrick Murphy 60–8 (23–5 SEC) SEC Regular Season Champion, SEC Tournament Champions, NCAA Regionals, NCAA Super Regionals, Women's College World Series 91,541 2,474/game
2013 Patrick Murphy 45–15 (13–11 SEC) 2013 SEC Softball Tournament, NCAA Regionals, NCAA Super Regionals 93,332 2,916/game
2014 Patrick Murphy 53-13 (19-5 SEC) NCAA Regionals, NCAA Super Regionals, Women's College World Series 83,233 2,774/game
2015 Patrick Murphy 48-15 (17-7 SEC) NCAA Regionals, NCAA Super Regionals, Women's College World Series 90,021 2,813/game
2016 Patrick Murphy 51-12 (17-8 SEC) NCAA Regionals, NCAA Super Regionals, Women's College World Series
Reference:[12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ "The University of Alabama Branding Standards 2015–2016" (PDF). 2015-08-17. Retrieved 2016-03-23. 
  2. ^ a b "Bama will sponsor women's softball program". The Tuscaloosa News. Google News. September 29, 1995. p. C4. Retrieved June 26, 2012. 
  3. ^ a b "Haack to direct Bama softball". The Tuscaloosa News. Google News. January 4, 1996. p. C3. Retrieved June 26, 2012. 
  4. ^ "Tide softball team opens season with win". The Tuscaloosa News. Google News. February 16, 1997. p. C8. Retrieved June 26, 2012. 
  5. ^ Deas, Tommy (February 28, 1997). "Alabama softball team triumphs in home opener". The Tuscaloosa News. Google News. p. C1. Retrieved June 26, 2012. 
  6. ^ a b c Deas, Tommy (July 1, 1998). "Bama softball coach Kalum Haack resigns". The Tuscaloosa News. Google News. p. C1. Retrieved June 26, 2012. 
  7. ^ Deas, Tommy (July 10, 1998). "Murphy takes over Bama softball". The Tuscaloosa News. Google News. p. C1. Retrieved June 26, 2012. 
  8. ^ "Tide softball season ends with loss to ASU, 3–1". University of Alabama Athletics Media Relations - RollTide.com. June 1, 2008. Retrieved December 31, 2008. 
  9. ^ "Alabama softball falls to Florida 6–5, ending its Women's College World Series run". University of Alabama Athletics Media Relations - RollTide.com. May 31, 2008. Retrieved June 30, 2008. 
  10. ^ Hays, Graham (June 7, 2012). "Alabama's title a milestone for SEC". ESPN.com. Retrieved June 26, 2012. 
  11. ^ 2012 University of Alabama Softball Media Guide, p. 50
  12. ^ 2012 University of Alabama Softball Media Guide, pp. 75–79

External links[edit]