Alameda County Study

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The Alameda County Study is a probability study of residents from Alameda County, California which examines the relationship between lifestyle and health.[1] The "1965 cohort" were given health questionaries in 1965, 1973, 1985, 1988, 1994, and 1999. In their examination of the collected data, D. Wingard and colleagues found that those who followed five practices lived healthier and longer lives:[2]

Later studies considered the impact of religiosity, social status, and hearing loss on health outcomes.[3]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Housman, Jeff; Dorman, Steve (September–October 2005). "The Alameda County Study: A Systematic, Chronological Review" (PDF). American Journal of Health Education. Reston, VA: American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance. 36 (5): 302–308. doi:10.1080/19325037.2005.10608200. ISSN 1055-6699. ERIC document number EJ792845. Retrieved 7 June 2010. 
  2. ^ Housman & Dorman 2005, pp. 303–304. "The linear model supported previous findings, including regular exercise, limited alcohol consumption, abstinence from smoking, sleeping 7-8 hours a night, and maintenance of a healthy weight play an important role in promoting longevity and delaying illness and death." Citing: Wingard Dl, B. L.; Berkman, L. F.; Brand, R. J. (1982). "A multivariate analysis of health-related practices: a nine-year mortality follow-up of the Alameda County Study". Am J Epidemiol. 116 (5): 765–775. PMID 7148802. 
  3. ^ Jeff Housman and Steve Dorman (Sep–Oct 2005). "The Alameda County Study: A Systematic, Chronological Review" (PDF). American Journal of Health Education.