Alan A. Stone

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Alan A. Stone
Born1929
NationalityAmerican
OccupationProfessor
ChildrenDouglas, David[1]
AwardsGuggenheim Fellowship
Academic background
Alma materYale Medical School
Academic work
DisciplineLaw, Psychiatry
InstitutionsHarvard Law School
Harvard Medical School
Main interestsEthics, Violence, Mental health
Notable worksLaw, Psychiatry, and Morality
WebsiteFaculty page

Alan Abraham Stone (born 1929)[2] is the Touroff-Glueck Professor of Law and Psychiatry (Emeritus) at the Harvard Law School.[3] His writing and teaching has focused on professional medical ethics, issues at the intersection of law and psychiatry, and the topic of violence in both law and in psychiatry.[4] Stone served as president of the American Psychiatric Association.[5] He also served for a number of years as the film critic for the Boston Review.[6]

Personal life[edit]

Stone graduated from Harvard College in 1950, where he majored in psychology and played on the Varsity Football team [[7]]. He studied at the Boston Psychoanalytic Institute[8] and earned his M.D. from Yale Medical School in 1955. He pursued his joint interest in the intersection of law, psychology, and psychiatry first as a lecturer at Harvard Law School in 1969, and later through a joint appointment with Harvard Medical School in 1972. In 1978, he was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship. He later lectured at Stanford before returning to Harvard.

Work[edit]

Stone's work often explores the intersection between psychiatry, ethics, and law. He wrote about decisions in psychotherapy in managed care, and about psychiatric treatment of oppressed minorities such as the Falun Gong and Soviet Jews.[9] In 2002, he asserted that it was time for psychiatry in the Western countries to reconsider accounts of political abuse of psychiatry in the USSR and in China.[10]

Stone believed that Andrei Snezhnevsky was wrongly condemned by critics.[10] According to Stone, one of the first points made by Soviet psychiatrists condemned for unethical political abuse of psychiatry, was that the revolution is the greatest good for the greatest number, the greatest piece of social justice, and the greatest beneficence imaginable in the twentieth century.[11][12] In the Western view, the ethical compass of Soviet psychiatrists began to wander when they acted in the service of this greatest beneficence.[11][12]

Publications[edit]

Books

  • Movies and the Moral Adventure of Life (2007)
  • Law, Psychiatry, and Morality: Essays and Analysis (1984)
  • The Abnormal Personality Through Literature (1966)

Articles

  • The Ethical Boundaries of Forensic Psychiatry: A View from the Ivory Tower (1984) [13]
  • A model state law on civil commitment of the mentally ill. (1983) [14]
  • Law, science, and psychiatric malpractice: a response to Klerman's indictment of psychoanalytic psychiatry (1990) [15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Here, Have a Seat"
  2. ^ VIAF: "Stone, Alan Abraham"
  3. ^ School, Harvard Law. "Alan A. Stone, M.D. | Harvard Law School". hls.harvard.edu. Retrieved 2018-06-09.
  4. ^ School, Harvard Law. "Alan A. Stone, M.D. | Harvard Law School". hls.harvard.edu. Retrieved 2018-06-09.
  5. ^ "Alan Stone, MD".
  6. ^ "Alan Stone Author Page". Boston Review.
  7. ^ "206 Athletes Get Major or Minor Awards in Fall Sports". The Crimson.
  8. ^ "Original Address - Alan A. Stone, M.D." harvardmagazine.com. Retrieved 2018-03-12.
  9. ^ Alan A. Stone, Psychiatrists on the Side of the Angels: The Falun Gong and Soviet Jewry, 30 J. Am. Acad. Psychiatry & L. 107 (2002).
  10. ^ a b Stone, Alan (2002). "Psychiatrists on the side of the angels: the Falun Gong and Soviet Jewry" (PDF). The Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law. 30 (1): 107–111. PMID 11931357.
  11. ^ a b Stone, Alan (1984). "The Ethical Boundaries of Forensic Psychiatry: A View from the Ivory Tower". Bulletin of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law. 12 (3): 209–219. PMID 6478062.
  12. ^ a b Stone, Alan (2008). "The Ethical Boundaries of Forensic Psychiatry: A View from the Ivory Tower". The Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law. 36 (2): 167–174. PMID 18583690.
  13. ^ Stone, Alan A. “The Ethical Boundaries of Forensic Psychiatry: A View from the Ivory Tower.” Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law, vol. 12, no. 3, 1984, pp. 209–219.
  14. ^ C, Stromberg, and Stone A. “A Model State Law on Civil Commitment of the Mentally Ill.” Harvard Journal on Legislation, vol. 20, no. 2, 1983, p. 275.
  15. ^ "Law, science, and psychiatric malpractice: a response to Klerman's indictment of psychoanalytic psychiatry". American Journal of Psychiatry. 147 (4): 419–427. 1990-04-01. doi:10.1176/ajp.147.4.419. ISSN 0002-953X.

External links[edit]