Alan Curtis (footballer)

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Alan Curtis
Personal information
Full name Alan Thomas Curtis[1]
Date of birth (1954-04-16) 16 April 1954 (age 62)
Place of birth Pentre, Rhondda, Wales
Height 5 ft 10 in (1.78 m)[1]
Playing position Forward
Club information
Current team
Swansea City (Loan Player Manager)
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1972–1979 Swansea City 248 (71)
1979–1980 Leeds United 28 (5)
1980–1983 Swansea City 90 (21)
1983–1986 Southampton 50 (5)
1986 Stoke City (loan) 3 (0)
1986–1989 Cardiff City 125 (10)
1989–1990 Swansea City 26 (3)
1990–1991 Barry Town 50 (5)
1994 Barry Town 13 (1)
Total 633 (121)
National team
1972 Wales U18 1 (0)
1976 Wales U21 1 (0)
1976 Wales U23 1 (0)
1976–1987 Wales 35 (6)
Teams managed
2004 Swansea City (caretaker)
2015–2016 Swansea City (caretaker)
2016–2017 Swansea City (caretaker)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

Alan Thomas Curtis (born 16 April 1954) is a former Wales international footballer, who played as a forward; he is currently Loan Player Manager at Swansea City.[2]

He began his career with Swansea City in 1972, and spent the next seven years with the "Swans", winning promotion out of the Fourth Division in 1977–78 and out of the Third Division in 1978–79. He was then sold on to Leeds United, but struggled in the First Division and was sold back to Swansea in 1980. He helped Swansea to win promotion out of the Second Division in 1980–81, but a period of decline for the club followed and he moved on to Southampton in November 1983. He played on loan at Stoke City towards the end of the 1985–86 season, before he joined Cardiff City in the summer. He helped the "Bluebirds" to win promotion out of the Fourth Division in 1987–88 and to also win the Welsh Cup in 1988. He made another return to Swansea during the 1989–90 campaign, and later ended his career with Barry Town, winning the Welsh Cup in 1994.

During his career he also represented Wales, scoring six goals in 35 international games. After retiring as a player he spent many years on the backroom staff at Swansea City, and has had several spells as as caretaker-manager.

Club career[edit]

Swansea City[edit]

He was born in Pentre, Rhondda on 16 April 1954 to Tydfil and Albert Curtis, a factory worker and coal miner respectively.[3] His uncle, Roy Paul, was a Wales international footballer.[4] He had an unsuccessful trial at Manchester United as a 13-year-old.[5] He represented Rhondda Schools, where he was spotted by Swansea City and offered a trial.[6] He chose to remain at his local Grammar school and pass his A-levels before going to Vetch Field for a trial in 1972, by which time he had already won a Wales under-18 cap.[7]

Manager Roy Bentley handed him his debut in the Football League in a 3–1 defeat to Southend United at Roots Hall in August 1972.[5] Though he did not have an extended run in the first team he did end the 1972–73 campaign with 14 appearances to his name. The team performed poorly, and a change of manager from Bentley to Harry Gregg could not prevent City being relegated out of the Third Division.[8]

Despite being retained by Gregg, Curtis had to work as a builder's apprentice during the summer of 1973 to supplement his low income.[9] Despite the arrival of John Charles as a coach and Herbie Way's promotion to player-coach, Gregg continued the physical style of football favoured by Bentley that did not suit Curtis well.[10] Regardless of being ill-suited to this approach Curtis established himself as a first-team regular and made 40 appearances in the 1973–74 season.[11] Gregg left Swansea mid-way through the 1974–75 campaign, and new manager Harry Griffiths insisted on playing a pass-and-move style of football.[11] Initial results were poor, and the club had to apply for re-election after finishing 22nd at the end of the campaign.

Griffiths switched Curtis from his usual outside-left to a centre-forward position during the 1975–76 campaign, and the move worked out so well that he remained a striker for the remainder of his career.[12] He claimed nine goals in 43 games, as Swansea improved to an 11th-place finish. He scored 17 goals in 53 appearances during the 1976–77 campaign, but Swansea missed out on promotion after finishing one point behind Bradford City despite boasting the highest goals tally in the Football League.[13]

A disappointing start to the 1977–78 season cost Griffiths his job, and new appointment John Toshack managed to take the club to promotion, with Curtis claiming 34 goals in 46 games to become the division's top-scorer that season. On 12 November, Curtis scored a hat-trick during a home win over Crewe Alexandra.[14] He also claimed a hat-trick in an 8–0 victory over Hartlepool United.[15]

Leeds United[edit]

However after scoring just six goals in 35 matches for Leeds.

Return to Swansea[edit]

He moved back to Swansea City and helped them gain promotion to the First Division in 1980–81. He scored in the South Wales derby on 27 December 1980, in a 3–3 draw with Cardiff City at Ninian Park.

He scored on the opening day of the 1981–82 season, as Swansea beat his former club Leeds 5–1.[16] The season was a highly successful one for both player and club, as he scored ten goals in 45 appearances to help Swansea to a sixth place league finish.

Swansea had a fine first season in the top-flight finishing in 6th position but back to back relegations saw the club slide back down into the Third Division.

Southampton[edit]

Curtis joined Southampton in November 1983 and he spent three seasons at The Dell scoring seven goals in 67 appearances. Towards the end of the 1985–86 season Curtis joined Stoke City on loan playing in three Second Division matches for the Potters.[17]

Cardiff City[edit]

He then joined Cardiff City where he spent four seasons helping the club gain promotion in 1987–88. He scored a goal in the 2–0 win over Wrexham in the 1988 Welsh Cup final at Vetch Field.[18]

Third spell at Swansea[edit]

He ended his Football League career with a return to Swansea.

Barry Town[edit]

However, he would experience further playing success in 1994, winning the Welsh Cup with Barry Town at the old National Stadium, aged 40.

International career[edit]

Curtis won one cap for the Wales under-18, under-21 and under-23 teams. He went on to score six goals in 35 international matches for the Wales senior team from 1976 to 1987.

Coaching and managerial career[edit]

Curtis worked in most backroom staff roles at Swansea City, as well as being a part of Brian Flynn's Wales under-21 coaching set up.[19]

He was appointed Swansea's first-team coach by new manager Michael Laudrup in July 2012.[20]

Curtis continued his role as first-team coach under manager Garry Monk. On 9 December 2015, following the dismissal of Monk, he became caretaker manager on a game-by-game basis as the club searched for a new manager. However on 7 January 2016, it was confirmed that Curtis would continue as manager until the end of the season.[21][22] Despite this, on 18 January, Francesco Guidolin was brought in as head coach, with Curtis returning to a coaching role at the club.[23][24]

Guidolin was sacked on 3 October 2016 and, after a short period with Bob Bradley in charge, Curtis again served as caretaker-manager before the arrival of Paul Clement in January 2017.[25]

Curtis became Swansea's first Loan Player Manager in January 2017; he monitors the progress of players out on loan.[26][27]

Personal life[edit]

He married Pauline, a native of Rhondda, in 1974.[28]

Career statistics[edit]

Playing statistics[edit]

Club Season League FA Cup League Cup Other[A] Total
Division Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Swansea City 1972–73 Third Division 13 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 0
1973–74 Fourth Division 38 4 1 0 1 0 0 0 40 4
1974–75 Fourth Division 37 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 39 0
1975–76 Fourth Division 41 9 1 0 1 0 0 0 43 9
1976–77 Fourth Division 46 14 1 0 6 3 0 0 53 17
1977–78 Fourth Division 39 32 5 2 2 0 0 0 46 34
1978–79 Third Division 34 12 3 5 4 3 0 0 40 20
Total 248 71 14 7 14 6 0 0 276 84
Leeds United 1979–80 First Division 22 4 1 0 2 0 4 1 29 5
1980–81 First Division 6 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 1
Total 28 5 1 0 2 0 4 1 35 6
Swansea City 1980–81 Second Division 20 6 1 0 0 0 0 0 21 6
1981–82 First Division 40 10 1 0 2 0 2 0 45 10
1982–83 First Division 21 4 1 0 2 0 3 2 27 6
1983–84 Second Division 9 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 12 1
Total 90 21 3 0 5 0 7 2 105 23
Southampton 1983–84 First Division 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 0
1984–85 First Division 30 4 3 1 7 1 1 0 41 6
1985–86 First Division 11 1 0 0 4 0 2 0 17 1
Total 50 5 3 1 11 1 3 0 67 7
Stoke City (loan) 1985–86 Second Division 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
Total 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
Cardiff City 1986–87 Fourth Division 42 4 4 0 3 0 1 0 50 4
1987–88 Fourth Division 40 2 1 0 2 1 2 0 45 3
1988–89 Third Division 35 4 3 0 4 1 6 1 48 6
1989–90 Third Division 8 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 10 0
Total 125 10 8 0 11 2 9 1 153 13
Swansea City 1989–90 Third Division 26 3 4 0 0 0 1 0 31 3
Total 26 3 4 0 0 0 1 0 31 3
Barry Town 1990–91 Southern League Midland Division 31 3 4 0 0 0 15 2 50 5
1993–94 League of Wales 10 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 13 1
Total 41 4 4 0 0 0 18 2 63 6
Career Total 611 119 37 8 43 9 42 6 733 143
A. ^ The "Other" column constitutes appearances and goals in the Football League Trophy, Screen Sport Super Cup, UEFA Cup Winners' Cup and UEFA Cup, as well as the FA Trophy, Welsh Cup, South Wales Senior Cup and Larchimage Windows Cup for Barry.

Managerial statistics[edit]

As of match played on 3 January 2017[29]

Team From To Record
G W D L Win %
Swansea City 18 March 2004 5 April 2004 4 1 1 2 25
Swansea City 9 December 2015 18 January 2016 8 2 2 4 25
Swansea City 27 December 2016 3 January 2017 2 1 0 1 50
Total 14 4 3 7 28.57

Honours[edit]

Player[edit]

Swansea City
Cardiff City
Barry Town

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ a b Chalk, Gary; Holley, Duncan; Bull, David (2013). All the Saints: A Complete Players' Who's Who of Southampton FC. Southampton: Hagiology Publishing. p. 286. ISBN 978-0-9926-8640-6. 
  2. ^ "New role for Swans legend Curtis". Swansea City AFC. Retrieved 6 January 2017. 
  3. ^ Curtis 2009, p. 14
  4. ^ Curtis 2009, p. 17
  5. ^ a b Curtis 2009, p. 41
  6. ^ Curtis 2009, p. 28
  7. ^ Curtis 2009, p. 29
  8. ^ Curtis 2009, p. 47
  9. ^ Curtis 2009, p. 51
  10. ^ Curtis 2009, p. 52
  11. ^ a b Curtis 2009, p. 55
  12. ^ Curtis 2009, p. 57
  13. ^ Curtis 2009, p. 61
  14. ^ Curtis 2009, p. 62
  15. ^ Curtis 2009, p. 64
  16. ^ Curtis 2009, p. 13
  17. ^ Lowe, Simon (2000). Stoke City The Modern Era - A Complete Record. Desert Island Books. ISBN 1-874287-39-2. 
  18. ^ "18 May 1988 at the Vetch Field, Swansea". wfda.co.uk/. Retrieved 8 February 2015. 
  19. ^ "Swansea manager Michael Laudrup adds Alan Curtis to his coaching staff". The Guardian. London. 6 July 2012. Retrieved 6 March 2013. 
  20. ^ "Alan Curtis in Michael Laudrup's Swansea City backroom team". BBC Sport. 6 July 2012. Retrieved 8 February 2015. 
  21. ^ "Swansea City: Alan Curtis to take charge until end of the season". BBC Sport. 7 January 2016. Retrieved 7 January 2016. 
  22. ^ "Curtis to manage Swans for rest of season as Alan maintains managerial duties for duration of campaign". Swansea City AFC. 7 January 2016. Retrieved 18 January 2016. 
  23. ^ "Francesco Guidolin: Swansea City name Italian as new head coach". BBC Sport. 18 January 2016. Retrieved 19 January 2016. 
  24. ^ Pritchard, Dafydd (19 January 2016). "Curtis happy as Guidolin takes reins". BBC Sport. Retrieved 19 January 2016. 
  25. ^ "Swansea must stay up or face struggle to get back, says Alan Curtis". The Guardian. 30 December 2016. Retrieved 27 January 2017. 
  26. ^ "New role for Swans legend Curtis". Swansea City AFC. 6 January 2017. Retrieved 6 January 2017. 
  27. ^ "Alan Curtis: Swansea City name club legend as loan player manager". BBC Sport. 6 January 2017. Retrieved 27 January 2017. 
  28. ^ Curtis 2009, p. 56
  29. ^ "Alan Curtis". Managers. Soccerbase. Retrieved 4 January 2017.