Alan David Lourie

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Alan David Lourie
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit
Assumed office
April 6, 1990
Appointed by George H. W. Bush
Preceded by Daniel Mortimer Friedman
Personal details
Born Alan David Lourie
(1935-01-13) January 13, 1935 (age 82)
Boston, Massachusetts
Education Harvard University (A.B.)
University of Wisconsin–Madison (M.S.)
University of Pennsylvania (Ph.D.)
Temple University School of Law (J.D.)

Alan David Lourie (born 1935) is a United States Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit.

Education and career[edit]

Born in Boston, Massachusetts, Lourie received an Artium Baccalaureus degree from Harvard College in 1956, a Master of Science in Organic Chemistry from the University of Wisconsin in 1958, a Doctor of Philosophy in Chemistry from the University of Pennsylvania in 1965, and a Juris Doctor from Temple University School of Law in 1970. He was a Chemist for Monsanto Corporation from 1957 to 1959, and then chemist and Patent Agent for Wyeth Labs in Radnor, Pennsylvania from 1959 to 1964. He was in-house counsel, to SmithKline Beecham Corporation from 1964 to 1990.[1]

Federal judicial service[edit]

On January 24, 1990, Lourie was nominated by President George H. W. Bush to a seat on the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit vacated by Judge Daniel Mortimer Friedman. Lourie was confirmed by the United States Senate on April 5, 1990, and received his commission on April 6, 1990.[1]

Patent outlook[edit]

He has been described as having a "pro-patent outlook" in the book Innovation and its Discontents by Harvard Business School professor Josh Lerner and by Brandeis University economics professor Adam B. Jaffe.[2]

References[edit]

Sources[edit]

Legal offices
Preceded by
Daniel Mortimer Friedman
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit
1990–present
Incumbent