Alan Geoffrey Hotham

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Sir Alan Hotham
Born (1876-10-03)3 October 1876
Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland
Died 10 July 1965(1965-07-10) (aged 88)
Victoria, London
Allegiance United Kingdom United Kingdom
Service/branch Naval Ensign of the United Kingdom.svg Royal Navy
Rank Admiral
Commands held HMS Comus
New Zealand Division
Battles/wars World War I
Awards Knight Commander of the Order of St Michael and St George
Companions of the Order of the Bath
Alan Hotham
Personal information
Full name Alan Geoffrey Hotham
Born (1876-11-03)3 November 1876
Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland
Died 10 July 1965(1965-07-10) (aged 88)
Victoria, London, England
Batting style Right-handed
Domestic team information
Years Team
1901 Hampshire
Career statistics
Competition FC
Matches 1
Runs scored 16
Batting average 8.00
100s/50s
Top score
Balls bowled 6
Wickets 0
Bowling average 6.00
5 wickets in innings
10 wickets in match
Best bowling 0/6
Catches/stumpings
Source: Cricinfo, 2 January 2010

Admiral Sir Alan Geoffrey Hotham, KCMG, CB (3 October 1876 – 10 July 1965) was an officer in the Royal Navy. He also played first-class cricket for Hampshire in 1901.

Naval career[edit]

Born the son of Admiral of the Fleet Sir Charles Hotham, Hotham was born in Edinburgh, Midlothian on 3 October 1876 and played first-class cricket for Hampshire in 1901.[1]

By then a commander, he was in July 1902 appointed as navigation officer to the HMS Duke of Wellington, stationed at Portsmouth for the Fleet Reserve.[2] He served during the First World War, commanding the C-class light cruiser HMS Comus at the Battle of Jutland.[3] He was appointed Director of Trade at the Admiralty in 1917 and Commodore Commanding the New Zealand Division in 1921[4] before serving as Director of Naval Intelligence at the Admiralty[5] from 1924 to 1927.[4] He retired from the navy in 1929 and became a member of Port of London Authority.[6] Hotham was Gentleman Usher of the Blue Rod between 1934[7] and 1959. In this capacity he was present at the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in 1953.[8]

He died in Victoria, London on 10 July 1965 at the age of 88.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b CricketWorld
  2. ^ "Naval & Military intelligence" The Times (London). Saturday, 5 July 1902. (36812), p. 9.
  3. ^ Battle of Jutland - Royal Navy Ships and Commanding Officers
  4. ^ a b Senior Royal Navy Appointments
  5. ^ Maisel, Ephraim The Foreign Office and foreign policy, 1919-1926 p.150
  6. ^ Metropolitan Counties Branch Supplement to the British Medical Journal, 22 October 1949
  7. ^ The London Gazette: no. 34103. p. 7154. 9 November 1934. Retrieved 31 December 2011.
  8. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 40020. p. 6240. 20 November 1953. Retrieved 31 December 2011.
Military offices
Preceded by
New Post
Commander-in-Chief, New Zealand Division
1921–1923
Succeeded by
Alister Beal
Preceded by
Maurice Fitzmaurice
Director of Naval Intelligence
1924–1927
Succeeded by
William Fisher
Court offices
Preceded by
Sir Reginald Laurence Antrobus
Gentleman Usher of the Blue Rod
1934–1959
Succeeded by
Sir George Beresford-Stooke