Alan Gray

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This article is about the British composer and organist. For other people, see Alan Gray (disambiguation). For Allan Gray, see Allan Gray (disambiguation).
Alan Gray
Born (1855-12-23)23 December 1855
York, North Yorkshire, United Kingdom
Died 27 September 1935(1935-09-27) (aged 79)
Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom
Occupation Organist, composer

Alan Gray (23 December 1855 – 27 September 1935) was a British organist and composer.[1]

Born in York, Gray attended St Peter's School in York and Trinity College, Cambridge. From 1883 until 1893 he was Director of Music at Wellington College. In 1893 he returned to Cambridge to be organist at Trinity College, where he remained until 1930.[2] He died in Cambridge, aged 79.

Among his compositions are liturgical music for Morning and Evening Prayer and the Office of Holy Communion for use in the Church of England according to the Book of Common Prayer, including an Evening Service in F minor, a setting of Holy Communion in G, several anthems, including 'What are these that glow from afar?', and a collection of descants to various hymn tunes, several of which are still in use today (Common Praise [2000] includes four). He also composed a number of works for organ, for violin solo and for voice and orchestra, set to religious and secular texts.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Alan Gray". Cyber Hymnal. Archived from the original on 2012-05-31. Retrieved 2009-01-23. 
  2. ^ "Gray, Alan (GRY873A)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 

External links[edit]

Cultural offices
Preceded by
Charles Villiers Stanford
Organist and Master of the Choristers of Trinity College, Cambridge
1893-1930
Succeeded by
Hubert Stanley Middleton