Alan Pierson

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Alan Emanuel Pierson

Alan Emanuel Pierson (born May 12, 1974, Chicago, Illinois) is an American conductor. His parents are Elaine Pierson and Edward S. Pierson, the latter an engineering professor at Purdue University Calumet.[1] Pierson is a 1996 graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with degrees in music and physics. At MIT, he was a timpanist and an assistant conductor with the MIT Symphony Orchestra, and also a composer.[2][3]

Pierson continued his studies in music at the Eastman School of Music, where he was a co-founder of the new music ensemble Ossia. Subsequently, he was a co-founder of the related new music ensemble Alarm Will Sound, which gave its first concert in 2001. Pierson became the first music director of Alarm Will Sound in the same year, and continues to serve in the post.

In January 2011, Pierson was named the artistic director of the former Brooklyn Philharmonic.[4] He formally assumed the Brooklyn title as of the 2011-2012 season and served one season, after which his contract was not renewed.[5] Outside of the USA, Pierson also serves as principal conductor of the Crash Ensemble in Ireland.

Pierson has resided in New York City since 2002.[6] In private life, he is civil partners with David Herszenson, a medical doctor. The couple affirmed their partnership in August 2010.[1]

In February 2013 Pierson was featured on the Radiolab episode "Speedthoven"[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "David Herszenson, Alan Pierson". New York Times. 2010-08-15. Retrieved 2012-02-03.
  2. ^ Lynn Heinemann (1996-05-15). "Alan Pierson leaves musical mark at MIT". MIT News. Retrieved 2012-02-03.
  3. ^ Liv Gold (January–February 2012). "Alan Pierson '96". Technology Review. Retrieved 2012-02-03.
  4. ^ Daniel J. Wakin (2011-01-20). "Arts, Briefly: Brooklyn Philharmonic Hires Artistic Director". New York Times. Retrieved 2012-02-03.
  5. ^ Steve Smith (2011-09-30). "In Brooklyn, A New Leader Who Knows No Boundaries". New York Times. Retrieved 2012-02-03.
  6. ^ Paul Pelkonen (2011-11-02). "Conductor brings Brooklyn Philharmonic back to life". New York Daily News. Retrieved 2012-02-03.
  7. ^ "Speedthoven". radiolab.org.

External links[edit]

Preceded by
(no predecessor)
Music Director, Alarm Will Sound
2001–present
Succeeded by
incumbent
Preceded by
Michael Christie (music director)
Artistic Director, Brooklyn Philharmonic
2011–2012
Succeeded by
Orchestra dissolved