Alaninol

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Alaninol
R- and S-alaninol.png
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
2-Aminopropan-1-ol
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.025.644 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • (S): 220-388-7
UNII
  • (S): InChI=1S/C3H9NO/c1-3(4)2-5/h3,5H,2,4H2,1H3/t3-/m0/s1
    Key: BKMMTJMQCTUHRP-VKHMYHEASA-N
  • (S): CC(CO)N
Properties
C3H9NO
Molar mass 75.111 g·mol−1
Appearance colorless solid
Melting point 96 °C racemate
72-72 °C for R or S
Boiling point 174.5 °C (346.1 °F; 447.6 K)
Hazards
GHS labelling:
GHS05: Corrosive
Danger
H314
P260, P264, P280, P301+P330+P331, P303+P361+P353, P304+P340, P305+P351+P338, P310, P321, P363, P405, P501
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Alaninol is the organic compound with the formula CH3CH(NH2)CH2OH. A colorless solid, the compound is classified as an amino alcohol. It can be generated by converting the carboxylic group of alanine to an alcohol with a strong reducing agent such as lithium aluminium hydride.[1] The compound is chiral, and as is normal for chiral compounds, the physical properties of the racemate differ somewhat from those of the enantiomers. It is a precursor to numerous chiral ligands used in asymmetric catalysis.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dickman, D.A.; Meyers, A.I.; Smith, G.A.; Gawley, R.E. (1990). "Reduction of α-Amino Acids". Organic Syntheses. 7: 530. doi:10.15227/orgsyn.063.0136. Retrieved 21 December 2022.
  2. ^ Dawson, Graham J.; Frost, Christopher G.; Williams, Jonathan M.J.; Coote, Steven J. (1993). "Asymmetric palladium catalysed allylic substitution using phosphorus containing oxazoline ligands". Tetrahedron Letters. 34 (19): 3149–3150. doi:10.1016/S0040-4039(00)93403-8.