Albert Carnesale

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Albert Carnesale
5th Chancellor of the University of California, Los Angeles
In office
1997–2006
Preceded by Charles E. Young
Succeeded by Norman Abrams (Acting)
Personal details
Born July 2, 1936 (age 81)
Nationality American
Alma mater Cooper Union (B.M.E.)
Drexel University (MEng.)
North Carolina State University (PhD)
Occupation Mechanical Engineer
University Chancellor

Albert Carnesale (born July 2, 1936) is an American academic and a specialist in arms control and national security.[1] He is a former chancellor of the University of California, Los Angeles, provost of Harvard University, and dean of the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard. In November 1994, while serving as dean and provost, Carnesale was appointed acting president of Harvard while President Neil L. Rudenstine was on leave.[2] He served in that position for three months.[3]. He has also been active in international diplomacy on nuclear arms control and nuclear non-proliferation. From 1970-72, he was a member of the U.S. delegation to the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT I) with the Soviet Union -- a major step towards controlling nuclear weapons. Carnesale teaches undergraduate and graduate courses at UCLA on topics relating to U.S. national security.[4]

Early years[edit]

Carnesale was born on July 2, 1936, in the Bronx, New York. His father was a taxi driver; his mother was an office clerk.[5] He graduated from the Bronx High School of Science,[6] where admission is based solely on a competitive written exam.[7] The first person in his family to attend college, he began his university education at the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art, completing a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering in 1957. He received a master's degree in mechanical engineering at Drexel University[8] in Philadelphia in 1961[9] and a PhD in nuclear engineering at North Carolina State University (NCSU) in 1966. While earning his master's degree, Carnesale also worked as a senior engineer at Martin Marietta Corporation.[10]

Career[edit]

North Carolina State University[edit]

Carnesale served on the nuclear engineering faculty at NCSU from 1962-69 and as professor and head of the Division of University Studies from 1972-74.[11]

Harvard University[edit]

During a 23-year tenure at Harvard University, Carnesale steadily ascended the ranks. He began as a member of the faculty in 1974, and concentrated on the study of international relations, national security policy, and nuclear arms control. In 1981 he was promoted to academic dean of the Kennedy School of Government[12]. A decade later, Carnesale became dean and was charged with restructuring the school, which faced a budget deficit,[13] and served in that post from 1991-1995. According to a lecturer at the School, Carnesale was appointed "because by the force of his personality, his great sense of humor and his capacity for getting to the heart of things quickly, he defused tensions."[14] When the New York Times announced the appointment, Harvard President Neil L. Rudenstine described Carnesale as "an exceptional human being." At the time of Carnesale's appointment, the Kennedy School faced "a debate over its identity," as tension developed between faculty who were professional scholars and those who were practitioners.[15] Carnesale said the solution lay in finding the right balance and respecting each other's contribution.[16] In 1994, Carnesale was tapped to fill the role of university provost, where he served until 1997. In that position he coordinated the university's central administration and oversaw academic programs that extended beyond Harvard's individual schools. He was key to the university's $2.1 billion capital campaign and efforts to apply information technology to academic and administrative operations. He also was part of the campaign to draw together Harvard's nine different faculties.[17] In November 1994, Carnesale was appointed acting president of Harvard while President Rudenstine was on leave.[2] He served in that position for three months.[3]

University of California, Los Angeles[edit]

On July 1, 1997, Carnesale was appointed chancellor of the University of California, Los Angeles, a position he held until June 30, 2006. Some of Carnesale's Harvard colleagues saw his departure as "a terrible loss."[18] Some at both Harvard and UCLA were concerned about his ability to understand a large public university system. His response: "I have enormous interest in all things public. I spent nine years teaching at a public university. In between I was in government. I spent my academic years at Harvard in the areas of public policy and administration."[19]

Carnesale arrived at UCLA when the UC system was facing soaring costs and sharp budget cuts. He said the university must remain affordable for all Californians.[20] While chancellor, he wrote and spoke about the "public-private gap in higher education," presenting funding models that could potentially enable public institutions to "remain true to the basic values on which they were founded: excellence and access for qualified students, regardless of ability to pay."[21] Throughout his tenure, Carnesale concentrated on attracting research funding and private gifts to sustain UCLA's trajectory toward the top tier of research universities in the face of declining state support. From 1997-2005, UCLA'a annual operating budget grew from $2.2 billion to $3.5 billion, while the state's portion shrank from 20.7 percent to 15 percent.[22]

When Carnesale was appointed at UCLA, California's Proposition 209 had just gone into effect, forbidding all state institutions from giving preference in admissions based on race or ethnicity. Carnesale believed diversity was essential in order for UCLA to fulfill its responsibilities as a public university. He cited three reasons: 1) Diversity is essential for providing the best possible education because students learn from each other. 2) Diversity is necessary in order to prepare leaders for all segments of society -- a charge of public universities. 3) Education is key to social and economic mobility. He said affirmative action is just one means of achieving diversity. "We can encourage minority students whose records make them eligible to apply, and then encourage those admitted to enroll. . . .We have to get more minorities eligible [so] we have to get more engaged in the high schools. . . . Equal opportunity should be a goal, an aspiration."[23] In May 1998, 88 UCLA students were arrested for refusing to leave a building during a 12-hour non-violent protest, demanding that Carnesale defy Prop 209. He replied that while he supported diversity on campus, he could not ignore Prop 209.[24] "I came to this university, knowing that Prop 209 would go into effect on my watch," he said. "I made the decision that it was important to do the best we could within the law, rather than stay at Harvard and not try."[25]

Following the events of September 11, 2001, Carnesale initiated a seminar program named for the university's motto, Fiat Lux, which means "Let there be light."[26] The program of 200 seminars was established to help students understand the events of September 11. The seminars enabled small, interdisciplinary groups of students to explore critical issues with faculty. Carnesale taught a seminar on national security.[27]

As chancellor, Carnesale oversaw the completion of a $3.1 billion fundraising campaign -- at the time the most ambitious in the history of higher education. He also launched the California Nanosystems Institute (CNSI), the Broad Stem Cell Research Institute, the Nazarian Center for Israeli Studies, and the Institute for Society and Genetics. Under his leadership, research funding from competitively awarded grants and contracts doubled, and UCLA formed more than 100 partnerships through Carnesale's "UCLA in L.A." initiative. During this time, the university took major steps toward transformation from a commuter school to a residential campus. From 1997-2005, UCLA completed or had under construction new housing for more than 4,600 undergraduate and graduate students.[28] Other additions to the campus included the UCLA Santa Monica Medical Center, Broad Art Center and new buildings for health sciences, physics, engineering, and CNSI. In addition, Glorya Kaufman Hall, Haines Hall, and the Humanities Building were renovated. Construction began on the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center. UCLA Athletics added 23 NCAA titles.[29]

When Carnesale announced that he was stepping down in 2006, he said he had missed teaching and policymaking and that his decision was prompted in part by current events. He said there were relatively few people working in national security who had Ph.D.s in fields like nuclear engineering. "If you're worried about nuclear proliferation and weapons of mass destruction and the like, and can bring that technical background as well as the policy background in international affairs and security . . . It's a comparative advantage that I have in an area that's terribly important to the country right now.[30] When he stepped down, he took a year-long sabbatical and then resumed teaching in UCLA's Luskin School of Public Affairs and Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science. In 2013, a new building in the residential portion of the UCLA campus was named Robin and Albert Carnesale Commons in honor of the chancellor emeritus and his wife. The building houses one of the nation's first health-themed dining halls, as well as a fitness hall and multipurpose space.[31]

Government and public policy[edit]

From 1969-72 Carnesale served as chief of the Defensive Weapons Systems Division, Science and Technology Bureau of the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency in Washington, D.C.[32] From 1970-72, he was a member of the U.S. delegation to the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT I) with the Soviet Union -- a major step towards controlling nuclear weapons.

Between 1977 and 1980, he led the U.S. delegation to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation (INFCE). This 66-nation multilateral meeting was intended to investigate and ultimately make recommendations regarding the relationships between civilian and military uses of nuclear energy and materials. In 1980 Carnesale was nominated by President Carter to be chairman of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. However, Carter's term as president ended before the nomination was brought to a Senate vote.[33]At the time of Carnesale's nomination, one of his Harvard colleagues said, "He's really perfect for the job. First, he's got a technical background--he's not a political appointee. At the same time, he can communicate complex technical issues in a way that is understandable to lay audiences."[34] In 1995, President Clinton appointed Carnesale to the Scientific and Policy Advisory Committee of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency.[35]

In 2009, Carnesale chaired a National Academies committee overseeing efforts to outline "America's Climate Choices" at the request of Congress.[36] When the committee submitted their report, in 2011, Carnesale said, [Climate change] is an urgent problem to turn to, and what we've done differently is look at this as a risk management problem. We don't know exactly when the tsunami will hit or how high it will be, but we know it is coming, and we should prepare."[37]In 2010 the U.S. Department of Energy appointed Carnesale to a high-level national commission on nuclear waste production, the 15-person Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future. Carnesale said the issues before the commission related "not only to nuclear power and reduced dependence on fossil fuels but also to climate change and nuclear proliferation."[38] In 2014, he was appointed to the U.S. Secretary of Energy's Advisory Board.[39] He also chaired the National Academies Committees [40]on NASA's Strategic Direction, on Nuclear Forensics and on the U.S. Conventional Prompt Global Strike.[41] He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations[42] and the Pacific Council on International Policy.[43]

Honors[edit]

Carnesale was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1996[44] and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2008.[45] In 2011 he received the Harvard Medal for service to the university.[46] Also in 2011, he was elected to the Nation Academy of Engineering "for bringing engineering excellence and objectivity to international security and arms control, and for leadership in higher education."[47] In 1997, he received an honorary doctor of letters degree from NCSU.[48] He also holds honorary degrees from Harvard University (A.M.), New Jersey Institute of Technology (Sc.D.), Drexel University (LL.D.)[49] and Pardee RAND Graduate School (D.P.P).[50] In 1985, he received the Gano Dunn Award for Outstanding Professional Achievement from the Cooper Union. [51]

Published Works[edit]

Books[edit]

Carnesale, Albert; Doty, Paul; Hoffman, Stanley; Huntington, Samuel P.; Nye, Joseph S.; Sagan, Scott D. (1983), Living with Nuclear Weapons, Harvard University Press and Bantam Books, ISBN 978-0674536654

Carnesale, Albert; Allison, Graham T; Nye, Joseph S. Jr. (1985), Hawks, Doves, and Owls: An Agenda for Avoiding Nuclear War, W.W. Norton, ISBN 978-0393019957

Carnesale, Albert; Haass, Richard N. (1987), Superpower Arms Control: Setting the Record Straight, Balllinger Publishing Company, ISBN 978-0887302299

Carnesale, Albert; Allison, Graham T., Nye, Joseph S., Jr. (1988), Fateful Visions: Avoiding Nuclear Catastrophe, Ballinger Publishing Company, ISBN 978-0887302725

Carnesale, Albert; Blackwill, Robert D. (1993), New Nuclear Nations: Consequences for U.S. Policy, Council on Foreign Relations ISBN 978-0876091531

Carnesale is also the author of more than 50 scholarly articles.[52]

References[edit]

Specific
  1. ^ "A Pragmatist, UCLA's Chancellor Runs Into Protests and PoliticsAlbert Carnesale". The Chronicle of Higher Education. 1998-12-18. Retrieved 2018-03-12. 
  2. ^ a b Butterfield, Fox (1997-03-07). "Dismay at Harvard as Provost Decides to Move". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2018-03-08. 
  3. ^ a b "Cambridge to California". dailybruin.com. Retrieved 2018-03-08. 
  4. ^ "Albert Carnesale | Pacific Council on International Policy". www.pacificcouncil.org. Retrieved 2018-03-08. 
  5. ^ "A Pragmatist, UCLA's Chancellor Runs Into Protests and PoliticsAlbert Carnesale". The Chronicle of Higher Education. 1998-12-18. Retrieved 2018-03-03. 
  6. ^ "New Head of Regulatory Panel; Albert Carnesale Man in the News Praise From the Director Graduate of Cooper Union" (PDF). Retrieved 2018-03-03. 
  7. ^ "Admissions". www.bxscience.edu. Retrieved 2018-03-03. 
  8. ^ "A Pragmatist, UCLA's Chancellor Runs Into Protests and PoliticsAlbert Carnesale". The Chronicle of Higher Education. 1998-12-18. Retrieved 2018-03-06. 
  9. ^ "New Head of Regulatory Panel; Albert Carnesale Man in the News Praise From the Director Graduate of Cooper Union" (PDF). Retrieved 2018-03-03. 
  10. ^ "A Pragmatist, UCLA's Chancellor Runs Into Protests and PoliticsAlbert Carnesale". The Chronicle of Higher Education. 1998-12-18. Retrieved 2018-03-03. 
  11. ^ "A Pragmatist, UCLA's Chancellor Runs Into Protests and PoliticsAlbert Carnesale". www.chronicle.com. Retrieved 2018-03-03. 
  12. ^ Services, UCLA Marketing & Communication. "Albert Carnesale - UCLA's Past Leaders". www.pastleaders.ucla.edu. Retrieved 2018-03-22. 
  13. ^ "Scaling Back Growth at Harvard's Kennedy School". The New York Times. 1991-12-18. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2018-03-03. 
  14. ^ Butterfield, Fox (1997-03-07). "Dismay at Harvard as Provost Decides to Move". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2018-03-06. 
  15. ^ Butterfield, Fox (1991-11-20). "Dean Is Appointed at Kennedy School". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2018-03-03. 
  16. ^ Butterfield, Fox (1991-12-18). "Scaling Back Growth at Harvard's Kennedy School". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2018-03-03. 
  17. ^ UCLA. "Harvard Provost is New UCLA Chancellor". UCLA Newsroom. Retrieved 2018-03-03. 
  18. ^ UCLA. "Harvard Provost is New UCLA Chancellor". UCLA Newsroom. Retrieved 2018-03-03. 
  19. ^ "Cambridge to California". dailybruin.com. Retrieved 2018-03-03. 
  20. ^ Jr, B. Drummond Ayres (1997-03-07). "University of California Goes Far Afield to Fill 2 Top Jobs". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2018-03-03. 
  21. ^ "The Private-Public Gap in Higher Education". The Chronicle of Higher Education. 2006-01-06. Retrieved 2018-03-03. 
  22. ^ Relations, Office of Media. "Albert Carnesale to Step Down as UCLA Chancellor in June 2006 to Resume Teaching, Scholarship and Engagement in International Affairs, National Security Policy". UCLA Newsroom. Retrieved 2018-03-06. 
  23. ^ Lewis, Anthony (1997-11-28). "Abroad at Home; Violins In the Wings". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2018-03-03. 
  24. ^ "88 Students Arrested at UCLA in Protest Over Ban on Racial Preferences". The Chronicle of Higher Education. 1998-05-29. Retrieved 2018-03-03. 
  25. ^ "A Pragmatist, UCLA's Chancellor Runs Into Protests and PoliticsAlbert Carnesale". The Chronicle of Higher Education. 1998-12-18. Retrieved 2018-03-03. 
  26. ^ ""˜Fiat Lux' offers smaller class setting". dailybruin.com. Retrieved 2018-03-06. 
  27. ^ Relations, Office of Media. "Albert Carnesale to Step Down as UCLA Chancellor in June 2006 to Resume Teaching, Scholarship and Engagement in International Affairs, National Security Policy". UCLA Newsroom. Retrieved 2018-03-06. 
  28. ^ Relations, Office of Media. "Albert Carnesale to Step Down as UCLA Chancellor in June 2006 to Resume Teaching, Scholarship and Engagement in International Affairs, National Security Policy". UCLA Newsroom. Retrieved 2018-03-06. 
  29. ^ Kendall, Rebecca. "Carnesales honored at building-naming ceremony on The Hill at UCLA". UCLA Newsroom. Retrieved 2018-03-03. 
  30. ^ "[Online Exclusive]: Out of the office, back to class". dailybruin.com. Retrieved 2018-03-06. 
  31. ^ Kendall, Rebecca. "Carnesales honored at building-naming ceremony on The Hill at UCLA". UCLA Newsroom. Retrieved 2018-03-03. 
  32. ^ "A Pragmatist, UCLA's Chancellor Runs Into Protests and PoliticsAlbert Carnesale". The Chronicle of Higher Education. 1998-12-18. Retrieved 2018-03-06. 
  33. ^ "Reagan Win Blocks NRC Appointment | News | The Harvard Crimson". www.thecrimson.com. Retrieved 2018-03-22. 
  34. ^ "New Head of Regulatory Panel; Albert Carnesale Man in the News Praise From the Director Graduate of Cooper Union" (PDF). Retrieved 2018-03-06. 
  35. ^ "Washington Almanac". The Chronicle of Higher Education. 1995-05-05. Retrieved 2018-03-06. 
  36. ^ Revkin, Andrew C. "Can Academy Shape U.S. Climate Choices?". Dot Earth Blog. Retrieved 2018-03-06. 
  37. ^ Kaufman, Leslie (2011-05-12). "Scientists Cite 'Pressing' Need to Limit Greenhouse Gases". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2018-03-06. 
  38. ^ "Professor Albert Carnesale chosen for Obama's prestigious Blue Ribbon Commission". dailybruin.com. Retrieved 2018-03-06. 
  39. ^ "MONIZ ANNOUNCES NEW 19-MEMBER ADVISORY BOARD - ExchangeMonitor". ExchangeMonitor. 2014-03-17. Retrieved 2018-03-07. 
  40. ^ "U.S. Air Force Strategic Deterrence Analytic Capabilities: An Assessment of Tools, Methods, and Approaches for the 21st Century Security Environment" (PDF). 
  41. ^ "Albert Carnesale - UCLA Luskin". UCLA Luskin. Retrieved 2018-03-22. 
  42. ^ "Membership Roster". Council on Foreign Relations. Retrieved 2018-03-22. 
  43. ^ "Albert Carnesale | Pacific Council on International Policy". www.pacificcouncil.org. Retrieved 2018-03-07. 
  44. ^ "American Academy of Arts and Sciences Elects 159 New Fellows". The Chronicle of Higher Education. 1996-05-24. Retrieved 2018-03-06. 
  45. ^ "Elected Fellows". AAAS - The World's Largest General Scientific Society. 2016-10-21. Retrieved 2018-03-08. 
  46. ^ "HAA Announces Harvard Medalists | Stories | Harvard Alumni". Harvard Alumni. Retrieved 2018-03-08. 
  47. ^ "Dr. Albert Carnesale". NAE Website. Retrieved 2018-03-08. 
  48. ^ Page, Dan. "North Carolina State University Recognizes UCLA Cancellor Albert Carnesale's Contributions to Society". UCLA Newsroom. Retrieved 2018-03-08. 
  49. ^ UCLA. "BRIEFSY". UCLA Newsroom. Retrieved 2018-03-14. 
  50. ^ "Pardee RAND Graduate School Celebrates 40th Anniversary". www.rand.org. Retrieved 2018-03-14. 
  51. ^ "Cooper Union Alumni Association | Gano Dunn Award Winners". cooperalumni.org. Retrieved 2018-03-08. 
  52. ^ Relations, Office of Media. "Albert Carnesale to Step Down as UCLA Chancellor in June 2006 to Resume Teaching, Scholarship and Engagement in International Affairs, National Security Policy". UCLA Newsroom. Retrieved 2018-03-12.