Albert Wolff (journalist)

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Albert Wolff

Albert Abraham Wolff (31 December 1835, Cologne – 22 December 1891, Paris), was a French writer, dramatist, journalist, and art critic who was born in Germany.

Biography[edit]

blue plaque commemorating Leno
Portrait of Wolff by Manet
Wolff's grave with bust by Jules Dalou

Wolff graduated from a trade school after teaching in Paris[citation needed]. This was followed by a degree [clarification needed] in Bonn before he settled in Paris in 1857. There he worked as a secretary for Alexandre Dumas. From 1859 he was editor of Le Charivari under the pseudonym Charles Brassac. He moved to Le Figaro where he became a leading art critic and was later promoted to editor of the newspaper. His discussions of the Paris Salon had a great impact of the success of contemporary artists. Wolff supported academic painting, with Jean-Louis-Ernest Meissonier as one of his favourite artists. Moreover he was intensively connected with contemporary French artists, a. o. the painters of the Barbizon School who he visited and interviewed frequently. In his publication of 1886: 'Notes upon certain Masters of the XIX century'[1] Wolff described the French painters whose pictures were exhibited on the exhibition 'Cent Chefs-d'Oeuvres: the Choiche of the French Private Galleries', in Paris, 1883. Wolff opposed Impressionism, although occasionally he praised individual works from this school. He also published detailed observations of Paris in several books and wrote several novels and stage plays. Politically, he opposed antisemitism.

He is buried in cimetière du Père-Lachaise (96th division).[2]

Works[edit]

Theatre
Varia
  • Notice biographique publiée en préface des Notes d'un musicien en voyage de Jacques Offenbach, Paris, 1877 Texte en ligne
  • Correspondance entre Albert Wolff et Marie-Lise B. : un amour romantique, Paris : La Pensée universelle, 1985

Bibliography[edit]

  • Gustave Toudouze, Albert Wolff : histoire d'un chroniqueur parisien, Paris : Victor Havard, 1883 Texte en ligne

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://archive.org/details/notesuponcertain00wolfiala
  2. ^ Bauer, Paul (2006). Deux siècles d'histoire au Père Lachaise. p. 786. ISBN 978-2914611480. 

External links[edit]