Albert Wolff (sculptor)

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Albert Wolff, from the Darmstädter Tagblatt (Nr. 22/1886)
Friedrich Wilhelm III Monument (1938), from the German Federal Archives

Carl Conrad Albert Wolff (14 November 1814, Neustrelitz – 20 June 1892, Berlin) was a German sculptor, and medallist.[1]

Life and work[edit]

His father was the architect and sculptor Christian Philipp Wolff [de], who died when Albert was only six. At the age of seventeen, he followed in the footsteps of his older brother and moved to Berlin, where he found a position in the workshop of his father's friend Christian Daniel Rauch and took night classes in anatomical drawing at a local art school.[2] In 1844, he was sent to Carrara (where the best marble could be found) to produce statues for the terrace of Sanssouci.

After two years in Italy, he returned to Berlin, assisting Rauch on a monument of Frederick the Great, but he also worked free-lance, producing a fountain with Countess Raczynska represented as Hygieia (in Posen) and a marble crucifix for a church in Kamenz.[2] Shortly after, he opened his own workshop. In addition to his larger works, he produced many smaller figures, statuettes and decorations that were widely copied.

In 1866, he was appointed a Professor at the Prussian Academy of Art[3] and had many students who would become well-known, including his own son Martin. He was named an honorary member of the Dresden Academy of Fine Arts in 1881.

Selected major works[edit]

Illustrations/writings[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ L. Forrer, Wolff, Albert (1916). Biographical Dictionary of Medallists. Volume VI. London: Spink & Son Ltd. pp. 526–527.
  2. ^ a b Hermann Arthur Lier (1898), "Wolff, Albert", Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie (ADB) (in German), 44, Leipzig: Duncker & Humblot, pp. 7–8
  3. ^ Berliner Adressbuch 1868 Wolff, Albert: Senatsmitglied der Akademie der Künste; Münzstraße in Alt-Berlin.
  4. ^ "The Entry of the Troops into Berlin". Burnley Advertiser. England. 24 June 1871. Retrieved 28 February 2017 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  5. ^ Hans-Werner Klünner: Berliner Plätze. Photographien von Max Missmann, Nicolaische Verlagsbuchhandlung, 1996, ISBN 3-87584-610-9. pg.17

Further reading[edit]

  • Thieme-Becker: Allgemeines Lexikon der Bildenden Künstler von der Antike bis zur Gegenwart. Vol.36. Leipzig 1947, pgs.189-190.
  • Jutta von Simson: Der Bildhauer Albert Wolff, Berlin 1982, ISBN 3-7861-1289-4.

External links[edit]