Alberta Highway 14

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Alberta Highway 14 shield Alberta Highway 14 Poundmaker shield

Highway 14
Poundmaker Trail
Route information
Length: 257 km (160 mi)
Major junctions
West end: Hwy 2 in Edmonton
 

Hwy 216 in Edmonton
Hwy 21 near Edmonton
Hwy 36 in Viking
Hwy 26 near Kinsella
Hwy 41 in Wainwright

Alberta Highway 17.svg Hwy 17 near the Saskatchewan border
East end: Saskatchewan border
continues east as Hwy 40
Location
Specialized
and rural
municipalities:
Strathcona County, Beaver County, Wainwright No. 61 M.D.
Major cities: Edmonton
Towns: Tofield, Viking, Wainwright
Villages: Ryley, Holden, Irma
Highway system

Provincial highways in Alberta

Hwy 13 Hwy 15

Alberta Provincial Highway No. 14[1] is an east-west highway through central Alberta. It spans from the City of Edmonton to the AlbertaSaskatchewan border. It runs parallel to the more northern Highway 16.

Along with Saskatchewan Highway 40 (with which it connects at the boundary), it forms part of the Poundmaker Trail, named after Chief Poundmaker of the Cree.

Route description[edit]

It begins in Edmonton as Whitemud Drive and at the Calgary Trail / Gateway Boulevard interchange, where it connects with Highway 2. It travels east for 9 km (5.6 mi) along Whitemud Drive until it reaches Highway 216 (Edmonton's outer ring road) and turns south for 2 km (1.2 mi). The highway then turns east and crosses Highway 21 before the divided highway ends west of South Cooking Lake. The highway continues east towards east towards Tofield, where it then turns in a southeast direction, paralleling the main line of the Canadian National Railway, and passes through Ryley, Poe, Holden, and Bruce before intersecting with Highway 36 (Veterans Memorial Highway) in Viking. The highway continues through, Kinsella, Irma, and Fabyan before passing through Wainwright and intersecting with Highway 41 (Buffalo Trail). The highway then travels due east and intersects with Highway 17 before entering Saskatchewan.[2]

History[edit]

Former alignments[edit]

Highway 14 used to begin in Old Strathcona at the intersection of 104 Street (Calgary Trail) and Whyte (82) Avenue and followed Whyte Avenue and 79 Avenue out of Edmonton[3] before it was moved to the newly constructed Sherwood Park Freeway in the mid-1960s.[4] Just west of Sherwood Park, Highway 14 branched south for 6 km (3.7 mi) along present-day Highway 216 before it turned east. In the 1980s, Highway 14 was moved to the Whitemud Drive; however it followed 50 Street and Sherwood Park Freeway as at the time Whitemud Drive terminated at 34 Street.[5] In 1999, Whitemud Drive was extended to present-day Highway 216 and Highway 14 was rerouted to its current alignment.[6]

Highway 14X[edit]

Highway 14X
Location: Strathcona County
Length: 3.1 km (1.9 mi)

Alberta Highway 14X[1] is a former spur of Highway 14 that connected with Highway 16. Located along the present-day Highway 216, it travelled 3.1 km (1.9 mi) from Sherwood Park Freeway to Baseline Road, where the roadway became Highway 16A. In 1996, it was extended north another 3.1 km (1.9 mi) to Yellowhead Trail (Highway 16) by renumbering a portion of Highway 16A,[7] but was then renumbered to Highway 216 in 1999.[6]

Major Intersections[edit]

From west to east:[8]

Rural/specialized municipality Location km[9] mi Destinations Notes
Continues as Hwy 2 west / Whitemud Drive – Athabasca, Slave Lake, Peace River
City of Edmonton 0 0 Hwy 2 south / Gateway Boulevard – Edmonton International Airport, Leduc, Red Deer, Calgary
Calgary Trail north – Edmonton City Centre
99 Street
Interchange
Alberta Highway 14.svg Hwy 14 begins
2 1.2 91 Street Interchange
4 2.5 75 Street / 66 Street Interchange
5 3.1 50 Street Interchange
7 4.3 34 Street Interchange
9 5.6 17 Street Interchange
Strathcona County 10 6 Hwy 216 north / Anthony Henday Drive (Exit 64)
Hwy 628 east
Hwy 14 branches south
Alberta Highway 14.svg Hwy 216 concurrency begins
Whitemud Drive ends • Becomes Anthony Henday Drive
12 7 Hwy 216 west / Anthony Henday Drive (Exit 66) Hwy 14 branches east
Hwy 216 concurrency ends
Anthony Henday Drive ends • Alberta Highway 14 (Poundmaker).svg Becomes Poundmaker Trail
20 12 Hwy 21 – Sherwood Park, Fort Saskatchewan, Camrose
26.75 16.62 Divided highway ends
27 17 Hwy 824 north – Ardrossan
South Cooking Lake 29 18 South Cooking Lake Road
Beaver County 52 32 Hwy 630 north – Lindbrook, Sherwood Park
Hwy 833 south – Camrose
Tofield 60 37 To Hwy 834 north (46 Avenue) Tofield west access
61 38 46 Avenue Tofield east access
63 39 Hwy 834 – Chipman, Round Hill
Ryley 79 49 Hwy 854 south – Bawlf Alberta Highway 14.svg Hwy 854 concurrency begins
80 50 Hwy 854 north – Mundare Hwy 854 concurrency ends
Holden 93 58 Hwy 855 – Mundare, Daysland
Bruce 108 67 Hwy 857 – Vegreville
Viking 128 80 Hwy 36 (Veterans Memorial Highway) – Two Hills, Killam
129 80 To Hwy 619 east
144 89 Hwy 26 west – Camrose
Kinsella 148 92 Hwy 870 south – Lougheed Alberta Highway 14.svg Hwy 870 concurrency begins
149 93 Hwy 870 north – Innisfree Hwy 870 concurrency ends
M.D. of Wainwright No. 61 Irma 170 110 Hwy 881 – Mannville, Hardisty
185 115 Hwy 883 north
187 116 Crosses Battle River
Fabyan 189 117 Range Road 75
Wainwright 198 123 1 Street south – CFB Wainwright
202 126 Hwy 41 (Buffalo Trail) – Vermilion, Consort
216 134 Hwy 610 north – Edgerton, Ribstone, Chauvin
223 139 Hwy 894 north Alberta Highway 14.svg Hwy 894 concurrency begins
226 140 Hwy 894 south – Edgerton Hwy 894 concurrency ends
232 144 Hwy 897 north – Paradise Valley, Kitscoty
254 158 Alberta Highway 17.svg Hwy 17 south – Dillberry Lake Provincial Park, Macklin Alberta Highway 14.svgAlberta Highway 17.svg Hwy 17 concurrency begins
256 159 Alberta Highway 17.svg Hwy 17 north – Lloydminster Hwy 17 concurrency ends
257 160 AlbertaSaskatchewan Boundary Alberta Highway 14.svg Hwy 14 ends
Continues as Hwy 40 east – Marsden, Cut Knife, The Battlefords

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Provincial Highways Designation Order, Alberta Transportation, p. 4 
  2. ^ Alberta Official Road Map (Map) (2015 ed.). Alberta Tourism, Parks and Recreation. § J–6, I–6, J–7, and J–8.
  3. ^ Alberta Official Road Map (Map) (1962 ed.). Government of the Province of Alberta. § Edmonton inset.
  4. ^ Province of Alberta Canada Official Road Map 1969 (Map). Government of the Province of Alberta. § Edmonton inset.
  5. ^ Province of Alberta Canada 1988 Official Road Map (Map). Alberta Tourism and Small Business. § Edmonton
  6. ^ a b Province of Alberta Canada Official Road Map 1999 (Map). Alberta Tourism and Small Business. § Edmonton
  7. ^ Province of Alberta Canada Official Road Map 1996 (Map). Alberta Tourism and Small Business. § Edmonton
  8. ^ Alberta Road Atlas (2005 ed.). Oshawa, ON: MapArt Publishing Corp. pp. 56, 57, 65, 66, and 67.
  9. ^ "Google Maps". Google Maps. Retrieved 2016-04-12. 

External links[edit]