Alberto Berasategui

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Alberto Berasategui
Country (sports)  Spain
Residence Bellaterra, Spain
Born (1973-06-28) 28 June 1973 (age 43)
Bilbao, Spain
Height 1.72 m (5 ft 7 12 in)
Turned pro 1991
Retired May 2001
Plays Right-handed (one and two-handed backhand)
Prize money $4,676,187
Singles
Career record 278–199
Career titles 14
Highest ranking No. 7 (14 November 1994)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open QF (1998)
French Open F (1994)
Wimbledon 1R (2000)
US Open 2R (1993, 1996)
Other tournaments
Tour Finals RR (1994)
Doubles
Career record 47–59
Career titles 1
Highest ranking No. 55 (6 October 1997)

Alberto Berasategui (born 28 June 1973) is a former professional tennis player from Spain. He won 14 singles titles and achieved a career-high ATP singles ranking of world No. 7 in November 1994.

Tennis career[edit]

Berasategui won a total of 14 top-level singles titles and 1 tour doubles titles. He won at least 1 singles title for 6 consecutive years (1993–1998). He began playing tennis at age seven and was the European junior champion in 1991. He turned professional later that year, and won his first top-level singles title in 1993, 2 years later. He reached a career-high singles ranking of world No. 7.

In 1994, Berasategui reached nine finals, winning seven of them. He also reached his first Grand Slam final at the French Open, where he faced fellow Spaniard and defending champion Sergi Bruguera. He was defeated in four sets, 3–6, 5–7, 6–2, 1–6.

Berasategui retired from the professional tour in May 2001, having had persistent wrist injuries since his match with Hernán Gumy at the Bologna tournament in June 1998. The injuries had an adverse effect on his results and form, and had caused his consistency and ranking to decline. He also suffered severe cramps of unknown origin in long matches.

Playing style[edit]

Bererasategui was known for his extreme western grip, known as the "Hawaiian grip", where his unusual hold on the racket would allow him to hit both forehands and backhands with the same side of the racket.[1] This helped him on clay, but he did not have much of an impact on other surfaces except for a quarterfinals appearance at the 1998 Australian Open, in which he beat world No. 2, Patrick Rafter, in the third round in four sets, and came back from two sets down to beat the 1995, 2000, and 2001 Australian Open champion, former and future world No. 1 Andre Agassi in the fourth round. He lost in quarterfinals to Marcelo Ríos after winning a tight first set tiebreak 7–6(8–6), 4–6, 4–6, 0–6.

Significant finals[edit]

Grand Slam finals[edit]

Singles: 1 (1 runner-up)[edit]

Outcome Year Championship Surface Opponent in the final Score in the final
Runner-up 1994 French Open Clay Spain Sergi Bruguera 3–6, 5–7, 6–2, 1–6

Career finals[edit]

Singles: 23 (14 titles, 9 runners-up)[edit]

Legend
Grand Slam tournaments (0–1)
Tennis Masters Cup (0–0)
ATP Masters Series (0–0)
ATP Championship Series (1–1)
ATP Tour (13–7)
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent in the final Score in the final
Runner-up 1. 30 August 1993 Umag, Croatia Clay Austria Thomas Muster 5–7, 6–3, 3–6
Runner-up 2. 11 October 1993 Athens, Greece Clay Spain Jordi Arrese 4–6, 6–3, 3–6
Winner 1. 8 November 1993 São Paulo, Brazil Clay Czech Republic Sláva Doseděl 6–4, 6–3
Runner-up 3. 15 November 1993 Buenos Aires, Argentina Clay Spain Carlos Costa 6–3, 1–6, 4–6
Winner 2. 18 April 1994 Nice, France Clay United States Jim Courier 6–4, 6–2
Runner-up 4. 23 May 1994 Bologna, Italy Clay Spain Javier Sánchez 6–7(3–7), 6–4, 3–6
Runner-up 5. 6 June 1994 French Open, Paris, France Clay Spain Sergi Bruguera 3–6, 5–7, 6–2, 1–6
Winner 3. 25 July 1994 Stuttgart, Germany Clay Italy Andrea Gaudenzi 7–5, 6–3, 7–6(7–5)
Winner 4. 29 August 1994 Umag, Croatia Clay Slovakia Karol Kučera 6–2, 6–4
Winner 5. 3 October 1994 Palermo, Italy Clay Spain Àlex Corretja 2–6, 7–6(8–6), 6–4
Winner 6. 10 October 1994 Athens, Greece Clay Spain Óscar Martínez 4–6, 7–6(7–4), 6–3
Winner 7. 31 October 1994 Santiago, Chile Clay Spain Francisco Clavet 6–3, 6–4
Winner 8. 7 November 1994 Montevideo, Uruguay Clay Spain Francisco Clavet 6–4, 6–0
Winner 9. 19 June 1995 Porto, Portugal Clay Spain Carlos Costa 3–6, 6–3, 6–4
Runner-up 6. 6 November 1995 Montevideo, Uruguay Clay Czech Republic Bohdan Ulihrach 2–6, 3–6
Winner 10. 24 June 1996 Bologna, Italy Clay Spain Carlos Costa 6–3, 6–4
Winner 11. 29 July 1996 Kitzbühel, Austria Clay Spain Àlex Corretja 6–2, 6–4, 6–4
Winner 12. 16 September 1996 Bucharest, Romania Clay Spain Carlos Moyà 6–1, 7–6(7–5)
Runner-up 7. 15 September 1997 Marbella, Spain Clay Spain Albert Costa 3–6, 2–6
Winner 13. 6 October 1997 Palermo, Italy Clay Slovakia Dominik Hrbatý 6–4, 6–2
Winner 14. 13 April 1998 Estoril, Portugal Clay Austria Thomas Muster 3–6, 6–1, 6–3
Runner-up 8. 20 April 1998 Barcelona, Spain Clay United States Todd Martin 2–6, 6–1, 3–6, 2–6
Runner-up 9. 11 October 1999 Palermo, Italy Clay France Arnaud di Pasquale 1–6, 3–6

Performance timelines[edit]

Singles[edit]

Key
W  F  SF QF #R RR Q# A P Z# PO G F-S SF-B NMS NH
(W) Won tournament; reached (F) final, (SF) semifinal, (QF) quarterfinal; (#R) rounds 4, 3, 2, 1; competed at a (RR) round-robin stage; reached a (Q#) qualification round; (A) absent; or (NH) tournament not held.
Tournament 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 SR W–L
Grand Slams
Australian Open A A A A A A 3R QF 1R 1R A 0 / 4 6–4
French Open A 1R 2R F 3R 3R 1R 4R 4R 1R A 0 / 9 17–9
Wimbledon A A A A A A A A A 1R A 0 / 1 0–1
US Open A A 2R 1R A 2R 1R 1R A A A 0 / 5 2–5
Win–Loss 0–0 0–1 2–2 6–2 2–1 3–2 2–3 7–3 3–2 0–3 0–0 0 / 19 25–19
Year-End Championship
Tennis Masters Cup Did Not Qualify RR Did Not Qualify 0 / 1 0–3
ATP Masters Series
Indian Wells A A A 1R 3R 1R QF 1R 1R A A 0 / 6 4–6
Miami A A A 3R 3R A 2R 2R 2R 1R A 0 / 6 2–6
Monte Carlo A A A 3R 3R 1R 2R SF 1R 1R A 0 / 7 8–7
Rome A A A 2R 1R 2R SF SF 2R A A 0 / 6 11–6
Hamburg A 2R A 1R 2R 2R QF 3R 3R A A 0 / 7 8–7
Canada A A A A A 2R A A A A A 0 / 1 1–1
Cincinnati A A A A 3R A A 1R A A A 0 / 2 2–2
Stuttgart (Stockholm) A A A A 1R 2R 1R A A A A 0 / 3 1–3
Paris A A A A A 3R 1R A A A A 0 / 2 2–2
Win–Loss 0–0 1–1 0–0 4–5 5–7 6–7 11–7 9–6 3–5 0–2 0–0 0 / 40 39–40
Year-End Ranking 298 115 36 8 32 19 23 21 60 153 737 $4,676,187

References[edit]

  1. ^ Roetert, P. & J.L. Groppel: World-Class Tennis Technique, p. 156. Human Kinetics, 2001.

External links[edit]