Albion, Queensland

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Albion
BrisbaneQueensland
StateLibQld 1 119784 Panorama from Albion towards Bowen Hills, ca. 1915.jpg
Panorama from Albion towards Bowen Hills, c. 1915
Albion is located in Queensland
Albion
Albion
Coordinates27°26′01″S 153°02′39″E / 27.4336°S 153.0441°E / -27.4336; 153.0441 (Albion (centre of suburb))Coordinates: 27°26′01″S 153°02′39″E / 27.4336°S 153.0441°E / -27.4336; 153.0441 (Albion (centre of suburb))
Population2,296 (2016 census)[1]
 • Density1,640/km2 (4,250/sq mi)
Postcode(s)4010
Area1.4 km2 (0.5 sq mi)
Time zoneAEST (UTC+10:00)
Location5.1 km (3 mi) NNE of Brisbane GPO
LGA(s)City of Brisbane
(Hamilton Ward)[2]
State electorate(s)Clayfield
Suburbs around Albion:
Lutwyche Wooloowin Clayfield
Windsor Albion Ascot
Bowen Hills Newstead Hamilton

Albion is an inner north-eastern suburb in the City of Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.[3] In the 2016 census, Albion had a population of 2,296 people.[1]

Geography[edit]

Albion is bounded by Wooloowin in the north, Ascot in the east, Newstead in the south, and Windsor to the west, with Breakfast Creek defining the suburb border in its south and south-west. Sandgate Road, a major road on the north side of Brisbane, runs through the middle of the suburb. A variety of housing styles, from former workers' cottages through to modern brick homes and unit blocks, can be found in Albion.

Breakfast Creek is a neighbourhood within the west of the suburb (27°26′20″S 153°02′45″E / 27.4388°S 153.0458°E / -27.4388; 153.0458 (Breakfast Creek)).[4]

The Albion Park Paceway is a harness racing club and greyhound racing track is Yulestar Street (27°26′16″S 153°02′47″E / 27.4377°S 153.0464°E / -27.4377; 153.0464 (Albion Park Paceway)).[5]

History[edit]

The name Breakfast Creek comes from Breakfast Point, which was a rocky point of the downstream side of the creek and was named by explorer John Oxley during his 1823 exploration of the Brisbane River.[3][6]

Students of East Brisbane State School having a geology lession at the Albion quarries, 1918

In 1860 John Petrie opened a quarry at Albion.[7] It occupied a site that today would be in the vicinity of Comus Avenue, loosely bounded by Crosby Road to the south, Morgan Street to the east, Tower Street to the north, and Lapraik Street to the west (27°25′54″S 153°02′58″E / 27.4318°S 153.0495°E / -27.4318; 153.0495 (Albion quarry (former))).[8][9]

Albion Hotel, Brisbane, ca. 1866, from which the suburb of Albion takes its name

The name Albion comes from the Albion Hotel built by Thomas Hayseldon (also written as Hazeldon), which was so called because the white wall of Petrie's quarry reminded Hayseldon of the England's white cliffs (Albion being an old name for England, from the Latin albus meaning white). From 1866 to 1870, the proprietor was Edward Hudson.[3] The low lying parts of Albion came into the limelight when a swampy area near the Breakfast Creek was designated as the racecourse. In 1885, it became the headquarters of the Smithfield Pony Club and later in 1895 of the Albion Park Racecourse. Many Chinese migrants settled here and the Temple of the Holy Triad was built on the Higgs Street for the local community in 1885-86.[10]

Breakfast Creek Sportsground was officially opened on Saturday 31 August 1899. Proprietors Michael Gannon and Andrew Lang Petrie drained a swamp to create a major recreational facilities, occupying 26 acres (11 ha) of a 30-acre (12 ha) site. The facilities included a racetrack, trotting track, bicycle track, fields for various sports such as cricket, football, tennis and lacrosse, a skating rink, and a lake for model boats. There were grandstands and a ballroom and concert hall with supper rooms and refreshment areas with 100 electric lights. There was a 435-foot (133 m) "switchback railway" (a roller-coaster) with four falls.[11][12] The Sportsground is now the Albion Park Paceway.[13][8]

Breakfast Creek State School opened on 7 July 1890 and closed on 11 August 1961.[14] It was on the western side of Agnew Street (27°26′25″S 153°02′48″E / 27.4404°S 153.0468°E / -27.4404; 153.0468 (Breakfast Creek State School (former))).[15][16] Following the closure of the school, the Fortitude Valley Opportunity School relocated into the buildings, becoming Newstead Opportunity School. Later it was renamed Newstead Special School (27°26′25″S 153°02′49″E / 27.4404°S 153.0469°E / -27.4404; 153.0469 (Newstead Opportunity/Special School (former))).[17] It closed in 1996.[14][18]

On 27 September 1880, eight blocks of land of "Corunna Estate" were advertised for auction by John Cameron.[19][20]

In 1883, a Baptist church opened in Albion.[21][22]

In December 1884, "Albion Township Estate" made up of ninety-one allotments of land were advertised to be auctioned by Arthur Martin & Co., Auctioneers. A map advertising the auction shows the proximity of the estate to Breakfast Creek.[23][24][25]

On 28 October 1899, sixty allotments of land of Albion Hill estate, being re-subdivisions 1 to 60, of subdivision of section 3 of portion 162, Parish of Enoggera, were advertised for auction by Isles, Love & Co.[26][27] The advertising map states the estate's proximity to Albion Train Station, with 76 trains daily. The land for sale was situated between Camden St, Albion, and Ford St and Old Sandgate Rd (now Bonney Ave), Clayfield.

A first meeting of the Church of Christ took place on 1 January 1911 at the Good Templar's hall in Stoneleigh Street involving members of the Ann Street congrgation. On 6 January 1912 a separate congregation was formed in Albion. Land for a church was bought at 86 McLennan Street in 1913 and the church was opened in 1915.[28][29] In 1929, the Albion congregation helped to establish a new congregation in Kedron. In 1992, the Albion and Kedron congregations merged to form the Brisbane North congregation and the Albion church was sold in 1997.[30]

On 5 December 1926 Roman Catholic Archbishop James Duhig laid the foundation stone for St Columban's College at "Highlands" at 451 Sandgate Road (27°25′42″S 153°02′47″E / 27.4282°S 153.0463°E / -27.4282; 153.0463 (St Columban's College (former))).[31][32] The school officially opened on Sunday 29 January 1928 as a school for boys operated by the Christian Brothers. In 1985 the Christian Brothers passed the management of the college to the Brisbane Diocese. This triggered a number of changes, a phasing out the primary school to focus on secondary schooling. In 1996 the school accepted enrolments from girls and in 1997 the school relocated to Caboolture.[33][34] The Albion site has been redeveloped as The Clayfield retirement village but three heritage buildings have been retained on the site: Highlands, O'Driscoll Hall and Whytecliffe.[35]

On 25 February 1929 a plan was drawn up for the Frank Mann Estate, Subdivisions 1 to 4 of Resubdivision 1 and Subdivision 1 of Resubdivision 1 of Subdivision A of Resubdivision 2 of Subdivisions 51 to 54 of Portion 149, Parish of Enoggera, County of Stanley.[36]

In the 2011 census, Albion recorded a population of 1,986 people, 48.4% female and 51.6% male. The median age of the Albion population was 33 years, 4 years below the national median of 37. 67.7% of people living in Albion were born in Australia, compared to the national average of 69.8%; the next most common countries of birth were New Zealand 4.4%, England 3.1%, India 3%, Italy 1.2%, China 1.1%. 79% of people spoke only English at home; the next most popular languages were 2.1% Italian, 1.2% Mandarin, 1.1% Nepali, 1% Arabic, 0.8% Punjabi. Of the total population in Albion, 1.2% were Indigenous persons.[37] In wealth terms, the median weekly individual income in Albion is approximately A$200 higher than the Australian average, and a median weekly family income A$220 higher. The suburb has a significantly higher proportion of residents that have never married (49.0%) compared to the Australian average (33.2%) and, in turn, a lower proportion of married persons (29.6% vs 49.6%).[37]

In the 2016 census, Albion had a population of 2,296 people.[1]

The Brisbane bid for the 2032 Summer Olympics includes building an athlete's village in Albion. Another is to be at the Gold Coast.[38]

Heritage listings[edit]

Abbotsford Road Bridge, listed on the Brisbane Heritage Register

Albion has a number of heritage-listed sites, including:

Albion Hotel, 2013, listed on the Brisbane Heritage Register
"Whytecliffe", liste on the Brisbane Heritage Register, 1930

Transport[edit]

On the Queensland Rail City network, Albion is serviced by Albion railway station on the Airport, Doomben, Caboolture, Shorncliffe and Sunshine Coast lines.

Historically, Albion lay on the Clayfield tram line, along Sandgate Road. It was operated by the Brisbane City Council until 13 April 1969.

Education[edit]

There are no schools in Albion.The nearest primary schools are Windsor State School in neighbouring Windsor to the west, Wooloowin State School in neighbouring Wooloowin to the north, Eagle Junction State School in neighbouring Clayfield to the north-east, and Ascot State School in neighbouring Ascot to the east. The nearest secondary school is Kedron State High School in Kedron to the north.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Australian Bureau of Statistics (27 June 2017). "Albion (SSC)". 2016 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 20 October 2018. Edit this at Wikidata
  2. ^ "Hamilton Ward". Brisbane City Council. Brisbane City Council. Archived from the original on 12 March 2017. Retrieved 12 March 2017.
  3. ^ a b c "Albion – suburb in City of Brisbane (entry 50088)". Queensland Place Names. Queensland Government. Retrieved 11 October 2020.
  4. ^ "Breakfast Creek – neighbourhood in City of Brisbane (entry 4402)". Queensland Place Names. Queensland Government. Retrieved 11 October 2020.
  5. ^ "Albion Park Harness Racing Club". Australian Harness Racing. Archived from the original on 5 April 2021. Retrieved 8 November 2021.
  6. ^ "BRISBANE AND THE BUFFS". The Week. Vol. CXII, no. 2, 997. Queensland, Australia. 31 May 1933. p. 39. Archived from the original on 16 October 2020. Retrieved 17 October 2020 – via National Library of Australia.
  7. ^ "Albion". Queensland Places. Centre for the Government of Queensland, University of Queensland. Archived from the original on 6 March 2021. Retrieved 9 November 2021.
  8. ^ a b "McKellars Official Map of Brisbane and Suburbs sheet 2" (Map). Queensland Government. 1895. Archived from the original on 8 November 2021. Retrieved 9 November 2021.
  9. ^ a b "Queensland Globe". State of Queensland. Retrieved 16 October 2020.
  10. ^ "Albion". Queensland Places. Archived from the original on 24 July 2019. Retrieved 24 July 2019.
  11. ^ "New Sports Ground". The Telegraph. No. 5, 105. Queensland, Australia. 21 February 1889. p. 4. Archived from the original on 9 November 2021. Retrieved 9 November 2021 – via National Library of Australia.
  12. ^ "SPORTING ECHOES". Queensland Figaro And Punch. Vol. XIII, no. 314. Queensland, Australia. 23 February 1889. p. 18 (SUPPLEMENT TO QUEENSLAND FIGARO). Archived from the original on 9 November 2021. Retrieved 9 November 2021 – via National Library of Australia.
  13. ^ "Breakfast Creek". Queensland Places. Centre for the Government of Queensland, University of Queensland. Archived from the original on 6 March 2021. Retrieved 9 November 2021.
  14. ^ a b Queensland Family History Society (2010), Queensland schools past and present (Version 1.01 ed.), Queensland Family History Society, ISBN 978-1-921171-26-0
  15. ^ "McKellars Official Map of Brisbane and Suburbs sheet 2" (Map). Queensland Government. 1895. Archived from the original on 8 November 2021. Retrieved 3 May 2022.
  16. ^ "Queensland Twenty Chain series sheet 2533" (Map). Queensland Government. 1958. Archived from the original on 16 October 2020. Retrieved 3 May 2022.
  17. ^ "Wooloowin" (Map). Queensland Government. 1978. Archived from the original on 3 May 2022. Retrieved 3 May 2022.
  18. ^ "Queensland state school - centre closures" (PDF). Queensland Government. 20 August 2013. Archived (PDF) from the original on 20 March 2022. Retrieved 7 April 2022.
  19. ^ "Plan of building sites, Corunna Estate, portion 149, Enoggera". 27 September 1880. hdl:10462/deriv/18685. {{cite journal}}: Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  20. ^ "Classified Advertising". The Brisbane Courier. Vol. XXXV, no. 4, 165. Queensland, Australia. 25 September 1880. p. 8. Archived from the original on 16 October 2020. Retrieved 5 March 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  21. ^ "Queensland Baptist churches by date of erection/opening". Baptist Church Archives Queensland. Archived from the original on 26 November 2021. Retrieved 29 November 2021.
  22. ^ "1883 Albion". Baptist Church Archives Queensland. Archived from the original on 26 November 2021. Retrieved 29 November 2021.
  23. ^ "[Albion] Township Estate Arthur Martin & Co., Auctioneers". State Library of Queensland. 1884. hdl:10462/deriv/264218. Archived from the original on 9 November 2021. Retrieved 20 January 2021.
  24. ^ "Classified Advertising". The Brisbane Courier. Vol. XXXIX, no. 8, 401. Queensland, Australia. 12 December 1884. p. 6. Archived from the original on 9 November 2021. Retrieved 20 January 2021 – via National Library of Australia.
  25. ^ "Commercial". The Telegraph. No. 3, 819. Queensland, Australia. 16 December 1884. p. 4. Archived from the original on 9 November 2021. Retrieved 20 January 2021 – via National Library of Australia.
  26. ^ State Library of Queensland. "Albion Hill Estate : being re-subdivisions 1 to 60, of subdivision of section 3 of portion 162, Parish of Enoggera". hdl:10462/deriv/207313. Archived from the original on 16 October 2020. Retrieved 3 June 2020.
  27. ^ "Advertising". The Telegraph. Queensland, Australia. 20 October 1899. p. 8. Archived from the original on 16 October 2020. Retrieved 3 June 2020 – via Trove.
  28. ^ Haigh, George; Churches of Christ in Queensland (1983), Churches of Christ in Queensland : 100 years venturing in faith, Historical Committee, Conference of Churches of Christ in Queensland, pp. 112–116, ISBN 978-0-909116-38-5
  29. ^ "Index to Churches". Gregory's Street Directory of Brisbane and Suburbs and Metropolitan Road Guide (11 ed.). 1975. pp. 105–112.
  30. ^ "Our History – Brisbane North Church of Christ". Archived from the original on 22 July 2021. Retrieved 22 July 2021.
  31. ^ "New Catholic School". The Telegraph. No. 16, 852. Queensland, Australia. 6 December 1926. p. 9 (5 O'CLOCK CITY EDITION). Archived from the original on 24 September 2020. Retrieved 24 September 2020 – via National Library of Australia.
  32. ^ Universal Business Directories (Aust.) Pty. Ltd (1990). UBD street directory. Brisbane. Universal Business Directories (Australia). p. 27. Archived from the original on 24 August 2020. Retrieved 24 September 2020.
  33. ^ Queensland Family History Society (2010), Queensland schools past and present (Version 1.01 ed.), Queensland Family History Society, ISBN 978-1-921171-26-0
  34. ^ "History". St Columban's College. Archived from the original on 24 September 2020. Retrieved 24 September 2020.
  35. ^ "The Clayfield: About". Aveo. 5 May 2020. Archived from the original on 24 September 2020. Retrieved 24 September 2020.
  36. ^ "Frank Mann Estate, Albion Subs 1 to 4 of Resub 1 and Sub 1 of Resub 1 of Sub A of Resub 2 of Subs 51 to 54 of Port. 149, Parish of Enoggera, County of Stanley". State Library of Queensland. Archived from the original on 9 November 2021. Retrieved 27 May 2021.
  37. ^ a b Australian Bureau of Statistics (25 October 2007). "Albion (Brisbane City) (State Suburb)". 2006 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 20 May 2008.
  38. ^ Brisbane announced as 2032 Olympic Games host city at IOC meeting in Tokyo Archived 24 July 2021 at the Wayback Machine, ABC News Online, 2021-07-21
  39. ^ "Abbotsford Road Bridge". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 7 March 2020.
  40. ^ "Dunaverty (entry 600045)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 6 July 2013.
  41. ^ "MUIOOF Lodge Hall (former)". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 16 February 2014.
  42. ^ "Early Cottage". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 16 February 2014.
  43. ^ "The Holy Triad Temple (entry 600056)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 6 July 2013.
  44. ^ "Albion Flour Mill (former)". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 16 February 2014.
  45. ^ "Breakfast Creek Hotel (entry 600057)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 6 July 2013.
  46. ^ "Herberton Cottage". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 16 February 2014.
  47. ^ "Fire of Hope Baptist Church Manse & Hall". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 16 February 2014.
  48. ^ "Residence 'Emerald' (former)". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 16 February 2014.
  49. ^ "Residence 'Argyle'". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 16 February 2014.
  50. ^ "Remnants of the 2nd Breakfast Creek Bridge (North)". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 16 February 2014.
  51. ^ "Shops". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 16 February 2014.
  52. ^ "Albion Building". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 16 February 2014.
  53. ^ "Wyllie's Buildings (Shops)". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 16 February 2014.
  54. ^ "Albion Hotel". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 16 February 2014.
  55. ^ "Commonwealth Bank (former)". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 16 February 2014.
  56. ^ "Albion Exchange". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 16 February 2014.
  57. ^ "Shops". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 16 February 2014.
  58. ^ "Albion Public Hall (former)". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 16 February 2014.
  59. ^ "Albion Post Office (former)". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 16 February 2014.
  60. ^ "Corner Shop and original baker's oven". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 16 February 2014.
  61. ^ "Shop & Residence". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 16 February 2014.
  62. ^ "St Columban's Christian Brothers College, Whytecliffe, Highlands (former)". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 16 February 2014.
  63. ^ "Shops". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 16 February 2014.
  64. ^ "Residence 'Whetfield'". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 16 February 2014.
  65. ^ "19th Century Cottage". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 16 February 2014.
  66. ^ "Duplex 'Caders'". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 16 February 2014.

External links[edit]