Albizia adianthifolia

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Albizia adianthifolia
Albizia adiantifolia 12102003 Afrique du sud.JPG
Scientific classification
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A. adianthifolia
Binomial name
Albizia adianthifolia
(Schumach.) W.F.Wight

Albizia adianthifolia is a tree in the family Fabaceae. It is commonly known as the flat-crown. Its range extends from eastern South Africa to Tropical Africa.

Description[edit]

This is a large deciduous tree with a spreading, flat crown, growing to a height of 25 metres (82 ft).[1] A profusion of bright green leaves and heavily scented, fluffy flowers are produced in winter or spring.[2] The leaves are twice compound with the leaflets being 2-5 x 8 mm in size.[3] This tree favours sandy soils in warm, high rainfall areas. In South Africa it is found in coastal lowland forests.[4]

Cultivation[edit]

Albizia adianthifolia is cultivated as an ornamental tree. The attractive habit of these trees makes them a popular garden tree, often being retained as a native plant in suburban gardens when other indigenous vegetation is removed.[5] The trees usually produce abundant seeds which are easily grown in sandy soil.[6]

Ecological significance[edit]

Elephants browse the leaves of these trees and blue duiker favour the leaves and seedpods as food.[7] The larvae of the satyr charaxes butterfly (Charaxes ethalion) feed on the leaves of these trees.[8]

See also[edit]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pooley, E. (1993). The Complete Field Guide to Trees of Natal, Zululand and Transkei. ISBN 0-620-17697-0.
  2. ^ Purves, M. (2010)
  3. ^ Pooley, E. (1993). The Complete Field Guide to Trees of Natal, Zululand and Transkei. ISBN 0-620-17697-0.
  4. ^ Pooley, E. (1993). The Complete Field Guide to Trees of Natal, Zululand and Transkei. ISBN 0-620-17697-0.
  5. ^ Purves, M. (2010)
  6. ^ Purves, M. (2010)
  7. ^ Pooley, E. (1993). The Complete Field Guide to Trees of Natal, Zululand and Transkei. ISBN 0-620-17697-0.
  8. ^ Williams, M. (1994). Butterflies of Southern Africa: A Field Guide. ISBN 1-86812-516-5.