Alcohol intolerance

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Alcohol intolerance
Other namesAcute alcohol sensitivity

Alcohol intolerance is due to a genetic polymorphism of the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase, the enzyme that metabolises ingested alcohol. This polymorphism is most often reported in Asian patients.[1] It can also be an effect or side effect associated with certain drugs such as disulfiram, metronidazole, or nilutamide. Stuffy nose and skin flushing are the most common symptoms when ingesting alcohol.[2] It may also be characterized as intolerance causing hangover symptoms similar to the "disulfiram-like reaction" of aldehyde dehydrogenase deficiency or chronic fatigue syndrome. Severe pain after drinking alcohol may indicate a more serious condition.[3]

If people are intolerant, some nearly non-alcoholic beverages may be a problem, similar to alcohol-containing medications, vinegar, inhalation of alcohol or the vapour of alcohol-containing cleaning agents.

Drinking alcohol first or afterwards together with Calcium cyanamide, an inorganic compound used as a fertilizer, can cause permanent or long lasting intolerance (nitrolime disease),[4] contributing together with other substances to the accumulation of harmful Acetaldehyde by inhibiting the enzyme acetaldehyde dehydrogenase.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Acute alcohol sensitivity | Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) – an NCATS Program". rarediseases.info.nih.gov. Retrieved 2018-04-17.
  2. ^ "Acute alcohol sensitivity | Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) – an NCATS Program". rarediseases.info.nih.gov. Retrieved 2018-04-17.
  3. ^ "Alcohol intolerance - Symptoms and causes". Mayo Clinic. Retrieved 2019-11-07.
  4. ^ Potential risks to human health and the environment from the use of calcium cyanamide as fertiliser, page 29, Scientific Committee on Health and Environmental Risks, Retrieved 14 November 2016