Aldo Maldera

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Aldo Maldera
Personal information
Date of birth (1953-10-14)14 October 1953
Place of birth Milan, Italy
Date of death 1 August 2012(2012-08-01) (aged 58)
Place of death Rome, Italy
Height 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in)
Playing position Defender
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1971–1972 Milan 1 (0)
1972–1973 Bologna 3 (0)
1973–1982 Milan 227 (30)
1982–1985 Roma 73 (6)
1985–1987 Fiorentina 18 (0)
1987–1988 Lucchese 0 (0)
National team
1971 Italy U-21 1 (0)
1976–1979 Italy 10 (0)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

Aldo Maldera (14 October 1953 – 1 August 2012) was an Italian footballer, who played as a fullback or as a wide midfielder on the left. A left-footed player, Maldera possessed an accurate and powerful shot, which earned him the nickname "Aldo-gol", due to his prolific goalscoring ability, despite his more defensive playing role; he was a hard-working team player, who was capable of aiding his team both offensively and defensively. Throughout his career, he was known for his pace, stamina, technique, dribbling, and crossing ability; his speed and galloping offensive runs earned him the nickname "the horse".[1][2]

Career[edit]

Club[edit]

Maldera was born in Milan, and he spent a large part of his career with one of the major local clubs of his city A.C. Milan (1971-1982); with the club, he won a Serie A title in 1979, two Coppa Italia trophies in 1972 and 1977, a Serie B title (earning promotion to Serie A the following season, following Milan's involvement in the 1980 Totonero football betting scandal) in 1981, and a Mitropa Cup, during his final season with the club, in 1982. Throughout his career, he also played for Bologna F.C. 1909 (for a half season loan, as a youth, during his time with Milan), local rivals Internazionale, A.S. Roma and A.C. Fiorentina.

Maldera won a total two Serie A titles throughout his career, at AC Milan and AS Roma respectively, both under the tutelage of manager Nils Liedholm. Maldera won his second career league title, with Roma, during the 1982-83 season, after leaving Milan following their relegation to Serie B at the conclusion of the 1981-82 season. Maldera this league victory up with a Coppa Italia with Roma in 1984, also reaching the European Cup final with Roma that season, only to lose out to Liverpool on penalties.[3][4]

International[edit]

Maldera made 10 appearances for Italy between 1974-1980. He represented his country at the 1978 FIFA World Cup,[5] and at Euro 1980 on home soil, where the Italian national side finished in fourth place on both occasions, reaching the semi-finals. He also made 9 appearances for the Italy reserve, B, side, and 1 appearance with the Italy national Under-21 side.[6]

Personal life[edit]

Maldera was the third son of a family of Apulian immigrants in Milan. Aldo's older brothers Luigi Maldera and Attilio Maldera both played football professionally. To distinguish them, Luigi was referred to as Maldera I, Attilio as Maldera II and Aldo as Maldera III.[7]

After retirement[edit]

Following his retirement, he worked as a football agent, and he lived in Rome with his wife. He also worked as member of the AS Roma youth system until 2004, and later also as Sport director of Greek club Panionios F.C.[3] with the president Zakiris and AC Milan's technical director Fabio Martella. [8][3]

On 1 August 2012 it was announced on the AS Roma website that Maldera had died in Rome at the age of 58.[9]

Honours[edit]

Milan[10]
Roma[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Aldo Maldera". Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  2. ^ "Aldo MALDERA (III - "Aldo Gol")". Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c "Vi ricordate Maldera? Noi vi diciamo come vive" (in Italian). Corriere dello Sport – Stadio. 3 November 2009. Retrieved 6 June 2010. 
  4. ^ "Aldo MALDERA (III - "Aldo Gol")". Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  5. ^ Aldo Maldera Statistics FIFA. Retrieved 4 February 2010.
  6. ^ "Aldo MALDERA (III - "Aldo Gol")". Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  7. ^ "Aldo MALDERA (III - "Aldo Gol")". Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  8. ^ "Aldo MALDERA (III - "Aldo Gol")". Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  9. ^ "Goodbye Aldo". AS Rome. Retrieved 2 August 2012. 
  10. ^ "Aldo MALDERA (III - "Aldo Gol")". Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  11. ^ "Aldo MALDERA (III - "Aldo Gol")". Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Alberto Bigon
Milan captain
1980-1981
Succeeded by
Fulvio Collovati